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The Two-Way
12:37 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Snapchat Settles With FTC Over Privacy Breach

Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel poses for photos, in Los Angeles, last year. The company has come under fire for violating promises to delete customer data.
Jae C. Hong AP

Mobile messaging service Snapchat has agreed to a settlement with the Federal Trade Commission over allegations that it deceived customers by collecting their user information without permission.

Snapchat's mobile app promises users that video and photos will "disappear forever" soon after they're sent, thus insuring privacy and safeguarding against data collection.

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The Two-Way
12:19 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Accusations Of Embezzlement, Sex Roil Old Kentucky Monastery

Trappist monks observe Vigils at 3:15 a.m. in Trappist, Ky., on July 3, 1998. An accountant at the abbey was indicted on Wednesday on 87 counts of theft.
Tony Gutierrez AP

There's an interesting story out of Kentucky where the former accountant for the nation's oldest operating monastery was indicted Wednesday for allegedly stealing more than $1 million from the Abbey of Gethsemani.

But John Hutchins, the man at the center of the allegations, says he was targeted because he revealed details of what he says were sexual affairs inside the 166-year-old monastery.

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The Two-Way
11:56 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Calif. City Wants To Make It A Crime To Bully Those Younger Than 26

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 5:13 pm

A California town is moving closer to making it a misdemeanor crime to bully anyone from kindergarten age up to 25 years old. The Carson City Council voted unanimously in favor of the measure this week, and it will come up for final approval May 20.

"We are going to protect not only the kid that is bothered in school, but when you leave school and go home, we're going to protect you as a city," bill co-sponsor Councilman Mike Gipson says, according to local KABC 7 TV.

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Author Interviews
11:26 am
Thu May 8, 2014

A Cartoonist's Funny, Heartbreaking Take On Caring For Aging Parents

Roz Chast Bloomsbury

It's never easy to talk with aging parents about the end of life, but it was maybe particularly difficult for Roz Chast and her parents, which is why her new graphic memoir is called Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?

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Movie Reviews
11:26 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Two Italys Take A Road Trip In 'Il Sorpasso'

Courtesy of the Criterion Collection

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 6:33 pm

If the road movie has a home, it's surely the United States. After all, the settling of America was itself a kind of humongous road picture — all those wagons rolling across the new continent's spectacular vastness. And with our ceaseless love of movement, we became the first people to be transported — in every sense — by the automobile. Small wonder, then, that so many famous Hollywood films, from It Happened One Night to Thelma & Louise, are all about hitting the road.

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Movies
11:00 am
Thu May 8, 2014

The Arab Activists Who Refuse To Bow To The Giant

A protest during the Arab Spring
We Are The Giant

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 12:59 pm

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The Two-Way
10:22 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Tsarnaev's Attorneys Say FBI Questions Violated His Rights

Results of the FBI's questioning of accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in a hospital last April should not be allowed as evidence, Tsarnaev's attorneys say. They're asking a federal judge to suppress statements he made as he suffered from gunshot wounds.

The agents said they needed to be sure the threat to public safety was over, according to the filing, which says they went too far in an attempt to "extract as much incriminating information as possible, without regard for the protections of the Fifth Amendment."

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Science
9:22 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Civil War Invades An Elephant Sanctuary: One Researcher's Escape

A female forest elephant charges, in Dzanga-Sangha Special Reserve in the Central African Republic.
Michael K. Nichols National Geographic/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 8:14 am

Ivory poachers are killing some 22,000 African elephants a year. Among the recent casualties was a group of rare forest elephants in the Central African Republic.

Those elephants were featured in an NPR program, Radio Expeditions, in 2002, when former NPR host and correspondent Alex Chadwick and sound engineer Bill McQuay went to central Africa to record them.

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The Two-Way
9:18 am
Thu May 8, 2014

The Interesting Bits From Monica Lewinsky's 'Vanity Fair' Article

Former White House intern Monica Lewinsky meets President Clinton at the White House on Dec. 16, 1996. Lewinsky, whose affair with Clinton eventually led to his impeachment, has written an article in Vanity Fair in which she talks about her life after the scandal.
Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 6:01 pm

The story you thought was long over is back: Monica Lewinsky, the former White House intern whose affair with President Clinton eventually led to his impeachment and made her the object of punch lines and scorn, has written an article in Vanity Fair in which she says, "It's time to burn the beret and bury the blue dress."

Lewinsky, who was 21 at the time of the affair, is now 40. She writes that it's "time to stop "tiptoeing around my past — and other people's futures."

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The Salt
8:57 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Less Nutritious Grains May Be In Our Future

Wheat fields like this one could yield wheat with less zinc and iron in the future if they are exposed to higher levels of CO2, according to the journal Nature.
Zaharov Evgeniy iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 7:26 am

In the future, Earth's atmosphere is likely to include a whole lot more carbon dioxide. And many have been puzzling over what that may mean for the future of food crops. Now, scientists are reporting that some of the world's most important crops contain fewer crucial nutrients when they grow in such an environment.

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All Songs Considered
8:32 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Song Premiere: Braid, 'Bang'

Braid.
Mitchell Wojcik Courtesy of the artist

We're now at the point where there's a good possibility that any of your most favorite (or most hated) '90s bands will give it another go. The shows can be great for fans new and old, but we sometimes grit our teeth when that band wants to hit the studio again. It's OK to be hesitant because, to update a parable, do we really want to pour new PBRs into old, skunked tallboys?

Well, the emo OGs in Braid have returned with their first full-length album in 16 years, No Coast, and "Bang" is our first sip.

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The Two-Way
8:26 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Brutal Attack On Nigerian Village Kills More Than 125

At least 125 people were killed in an attack on a market in a Nigerian village near the Cameroon border. The violence is suspected to be the work of Islamist extremist group Boko Haram, which has also claimed responsibility for abducting more than 250 girls from a school last month.

CNN says that the attack targeted "an area that troops had been using as a base in the search" for the kidnapped girls.

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The Two-Way
8:23 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Former U.S. General In Africa: 'I Think We Can' Help Find Nigerian Girls

The effort to find hundreds of abducted Nigerian schoolgirls has gone international — and so has anger over the mass kidnapping, as evidenced by this protest Thursday in South Africa. Retired Gen. Carter Ham says there's still a chance for the U.S. to help.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 4:05 pm

What can the U.S. — or anyone — do to return more than 200 abducted girls to their families in Nigeria? And what might happen if the U.S. engages with another violent group of extremists? Retired Gen. Carter Ham, who until last year led the U.S. African Command, says there's still a chance to help.

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Ask Me Another
7:42 am
Thu May 8, 2014

House Of Games

It's the home stretch in this final round, a game in which all the answers contain the word "house." For example, a popular spy-themed restaurant in Milwaukee is "Safe House."

Heard in Episode 316: Meet Me In Milwaukee

Ask Me Another
7:42 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Hidden Vegetables

Your parents might have snuck your veggies into unexpected dishes, but we got clever and hid the names of vegetables in the answers of this game. What German composer was a fan of red, edible roots?

Plus, hear Jonathan Coulton lead the crowd in a rowdy rendition of "Blister In The Sun" by the Milwaukee-bred rockers Violent Femmes.

Heard in Episode 316: Meet Me In Milwaukee

Ask Me Another
7:42 am
Thu May 8, 2014

The Both: The Newly-Formed-Band-Game

Aimee, presumably wearing the leather shorts she would save from a fire. No word on where Ted's giraffe-print cardigan is.
Christian Lantry

Musicians Aimee Mann and Ted Leo play together as The Both, but how well do these new bandmates know each other's quirks? To find out, we quiz them in the style of The Newlywed Game, where each must figure out how the other would answer questions such as "What's the worst piece of clothing you brought on tour?" and "What one item would you rescue from your burning house?"

Plus, hear a live version of "No Sir," from the duo's eponymous debut album as The Both.

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Ask Me Another
7:42 am
Thu May 8, 2014

My-My-My-Clues

Was The Knack's "My Sharona" stuck in your head for all of 1979? We hope you're not sick of it. In this game, Jonathan Coulton sings rewritten lyrics about things that rhyme with "Sharona." My-my-my-my Corona!

Heard in Episode 316: Meet Me In Milwaukee

Ask Me Another
7:42 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Shark Jumping

Inspired by a famous episode of Happy Days, this game is about "jump the shark" moments: that point when a TV show's quality starts to go downhill. We'll give you the moment, you tell us the show.

Heard in Episode 316: Meet Me In Milwaukee

Business
6:32 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Advocates Back Paid Sick Leave, But Opponents Won't Cough It Up

Activists hold signs during a rally on Jan. 18, 2013, at New York's City Hall to call for immediate action on paid sick days legislation in light of the continued spread of the flu. Last month, New York City began requiring employers to provide paid sick days, joining the ranks of other cities such as Washington, Seattle and San Francisco.
Mary Altaffer AP

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 12:03 pm

If you've ever seen your waiter sneeze, you may have asked for a different server. If you've seen one sneeze repeatedly, you might wonder why he's still at work, serving tainted food.

See, most restaurant workers don't get paid when they stay home sick. But, some go to work anyway, when they've got the sniffles or worse, because they need the paycheck.

For labor advocates, that's a problem.

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The Seams
5:58 am
Thu May 8, 2014

The Art Of A Lost American Couturier, On Display At The Met

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 2:32 pm

Thursday in New York, the Metropolitan Museum of Art officially reopens its fashion galleries after a $40 million, two-year renovation.

Named for Vogue magazine's editor, the Anna Wintour Costume Center features an inaugural exhibit of the work of Charles James, a flamboyant designer considered America's first couturier. This caps days of glamorous events at the Met, including the Costume Institute's benefit gala, presided over by Wintour — with Hollywood stars.

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Business
5:58 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Silent Tracks Earn Indie Band $20,000 In Royalties

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: silence is golden.

An indie band in Michigan recently made an odd request of its fans.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The band Vulfpeck uploaded an album on the Spotify music site called "Sleepify." It contained 30-second tracks of silence. They encourage fans to keep playing the silence while they sleep. This is meant to earn royalties. Spotify pays a fraction of a penny each time a song is played, and the same apparently, with hitting play on silence.

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Around the Nation
5:58 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Calif. Boy Enjoys Homemade Roller Coaster

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Around the Nation
5:58 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Businessman Buys 'Born To Run' Draft

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep, with a rough draft of Bruce Springsteen, a single sheet of paper with the original version of the lyrics to "Born to Run." It includes random references to rebels, but no mention of Wendy, the girl he falls in love with.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BORN TO RUN")

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN: (Singing) Wendy wrap me in, I wanna be your friend...

Africa
5:58 am
Thu May 8, 2014

U.S. Team To Assist Nigeria In Locating Kidnapped School Girls

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Let's talk through what the United States may be able to do in searching for kidnapped girls in Nigeria. The U.S. has promised assistance, Nigerian officials have now accepted. This would involve the United State more overtly than before in fighting Boko Haram, the extremist group that says it took the girls.

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Africa
5:58 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Peacekeeping Missions Lack Trust In Central African Republic

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Here's a scene that journalist Graeme Wood witnessed recently in the Central African Republic. He'd gone to a cell phone shop in the capital, Bangui. Out front a guy in a motorcycle was holding up an AK-47, screaming angrily about his cell phone.

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Middle East
5:58 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Assad Troops Retake Homs, Symbol Of Syria's Uprising

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

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The Two-Way
5:52 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Book News: New York Public Library Scraps Controversial Renovation

The main branch of the New York Public Library in New York City.
Seth Wenig AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Avant-Garde Madness, Seen Through 'My Dog-Eyes'

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 1:45 pm

Oftentimes, madness breeds the finest art. It's factual. Some of the most historic and well-regarded pieces of literature have come out of a sort of psychosis. From the works of Edgar Allan Poe to Tennessee Williams and a host of others, the evidence is there. And I find it celebratory — the way the mind overcomes itself to render something beautifully charged.

"God? A surface of ice anchored to laughter."

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The Two-Way
4:42 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Ukraine's Separatists To Proceed With Vote, Despite Putin

Pro-Russian separatists say they'll hold a referendum Sunday on seceding from Ukraine, despite Russian President Vladimir Putin's comments that they should wait to hold the vote. Thursday, a gunman installs a banner reading "Do not forget, do not forgive!" in eastern Ukraine.
Darko Vojinovic AP

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 12:55 pm

A day after Russian President Vladimir Putin told separatists in Ukraine they should postpone a referendum on secession, leaders of the group say they'll hold the vote this Sunday as planned.

The decision was announced by a committee heading the so-called Donetsk People's Republic in eastern Ukraine. The group held a news conference Thursday to say they would go ahead with plans to hold the vote.

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