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The Two-Way
5:24 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

House Lawmakers Vote To Reopen Benghazi Probe

South Carolina GOP Rep. Trey Gowdy leaves a closed-door Republican strategy meeting at the Capitol on Wednesday. Gowdy has been tapped to lead the new Benghazi investigative committee.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

The House voted on Thursday to establish a new investigative committee to look into circumstances surrounding the attack two years ago on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, that killed the ambassador and three others.

Republicans accuse the White House of misleading the public about the nature of the Sept. 11, 2012, attack and stonewalling efforts by Congress to investigate. Democrats see the creation of the new investigative committee as an election-year political ploy to raise money and motivate the party's base.

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The Protojournalist
5:01 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

13 Spliffy Jobs In The Marijuana Industry

Say what you will about the morality of marijuana, now that 21 U.S. states — and the District of Columbia — have passed some type of pot-friendly legalization, selling weed is big business.

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It's All Politics
4:42 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Latest Partisan Flashpoint: GOP Benghazi Fundraising

NRCC screenshot

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 5:09 pm

The name "Benghazi" used to just inflame conservatives. Now it is demonstrating its power to outrage progressives as well, though for different reasons.

To be precise, Democrats are angered not just by the House GOP's creation of a special committee to probe the 2012 terrorist attacks in Libya that left four Americans dead but by Republican fundraising in connection with the Benghazi probe.

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Around the Nation
3:50 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

The Messy Legal Road That Led To Oklahoma's Botched Execution

Republican Gov. Mary Fallin of Oklahoma, here with Michael C. Thompson, state secretary of safety and security, charged that the state Supreme Court had exceeded its jurisdiction when it called for a stay of execution in the Clayton Lockett case in March.
Alonzo Adams AP

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 9:08 pm

Although most of the country just became aware of issues with Oklahoma's capital punishment protocols last week after Clayton Lockett's bungled execution, his lawyers had been worried for months. That's because in January, two condemned men in different states but injected with the same new drug cocktail endured executions that went badly. Lockett's lawyer, Susanna Gattoni, was unable to keep him from suffering a similar fate last week.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

'Neighbors' Just Wants To Be The Gross Joke Next Door

Zac Efron in Neighbors.
Universal Pictures

Makers of R-rated comedies face an essential dilemma: finding brand new ways to gross out their snickering adolescent viewers. But as Neighbors demonstrates, there's another challenge that's just as tricky: piloting the raunchy scenario to a payoff that upholds the very middle-class values the movie gleefully profanes.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

To Be Young, Foolish And Baffled: Coming Of Age In 'Palo Alto'

Emma Roberts in James Franco's Palo Alto.
Tribeca Film

"What's going through your mind when you're doing that... or do you not think at all?" Those words, familiar to any teenager and parent, get yelled at Teddy (Jack Kilmer) about halfway through Palo Alto. Teddy, still in high school, is on probation after his second arrest, his final chance to get his act together before facing time in a juvenile detention center.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Jesse Eisenberg And Jesse Eisenberg In A Queasy Sea Of Despair

Jesse Eisenberg in The Double.
Magnolia Pictures

"You're in my place," is the first line in Richard Ayode's, The Double, spoken to Simon James (Jesse Eisenberg) on an otherwise empty subway train where he's apparently sitting in someone's preferred spot. It's also an apt – and maybe a little too on the nose – summary of what follows.

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Remembrances
2:54 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Remembering Author Farley Mowat, Who 'Wore His Kilt Dangerously'

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 5:49 pm

Canadian writer Farley Mowat has died at the age of 92. The prolific author published 45 books, perhaps the most popular of which was Never Cry Wolf. He is remembered by Doug Gibson, Mowat's publisher and longtime friend.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Television
2:54 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Let's Be Careful Out There: The Legacy Of 'Hill Street Blues'

Michael Conrad as Sgt. Phil Esterhaus does the cop roll call, concluding with his signature line: "Let's be careful out there."
NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 5:49 pm

This is the moment that launched a TV revolution, every week. The police roll call: Sgt. Phil Esterhaus faced his colleagues — a paternal, knowing grin on his face — while he ran down the day's advisories about a black male pickpocket wearing a blond wig and purple dress, or the need for officers to catch a rapist terrorizing their precinct.

"Let's spend a little less time flirting with the hookers and the waitresses and put some heavy attention on that park," Esterhaus told his patrolmen in one roll call, sparking laughter and feigned denials from the crowd.

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Television
2:54 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Lurid Meets Literary In 'Penny Dreadful,' An All-Star Gothic Revue

Showtime's new psychological thriller re-imagines classic Victorian boogeymen like Dr. Frankenstein, Dorian Gray and Count Dracula all lurking in London's darkest corners, discussing romantic poetry. Reeve Carney and Eva Green star as Dorian Gray and Vanessa Ives.
Pat Redmond Showtime

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 6:19 pm

There's a specific subset of NPR listeners who are also dedicated horror fans. If you fall in that category, the new drama Penny Dreadful -- premiering Sunday on Showtime — may hit all your sweet spots. Imagine an all-star Gothic revue that brings together Dr. Victor Frankenstein, Dorian Gray, Count Dracula — plus a core team of original characters including a Wild West sharpshooter, an astringent lady spiritualist and an intrepid explorer, in the Sir Richard Burton or David Livingstone mode.

But the show's creator was originally inspired by romantic poetry.

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Shots - Health News
2:54 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Mental Health 101: Program Helps Police Intervene In Crises

A police officer stands outside the entrance to Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., on Dec. 15, 2012.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 6:24 pm

How do you tell the difference between someone who needs to be taken to jail and someone who needs to be taken to the hospital? It can be a delicate situation to decipher, and it's been a big concern in Connecticut since the Newtown shootings of 2012.

Lance Newkirchen, a regular patrol officer in the town of Fairfield, is also specifically trained to respond to mental health calls. On a recent weekday, he headed out in his patrol car for a follow-up call.

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Politics
2:54 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Keystone Pipeline Dispute Muddles The Path Forward On Energy Bill

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 7:29 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The fight over the Keystone XL oil pipeline has stalled progress on an unrelated bill in the U.S. Senate. Republicans want to attach a series of amendments, including approval for the pipeline to a bill about energy efficiency. But Democratic leader Harry Reid says the Keystone vote ought to be separate. And as NPR's Jeff Brady reports, the disagreement leaves the energy efficiency bill in limbo.

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Parallels
2:54 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

The Nation That Elects The Most Women Is ...

Rwandan President Paul Kagame takes part in a conference on the role of women at the nation's Parliament in the capital, Kigali, in 2010. Women in Rwanda account for 64 percent of the lower house of Parliament — a higher percentage than in any other country.
Jason Straziuso AP

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 5:49 pm

As Rwanda began to rebuild itself from the ashes of the 1994 genocide, something unexpected happened: Women began playing a much more influential role on many fronts, including politics.

Traditions that had limited women previously were cast aside, and President Paul Kagame also actively pushed for women to be in more prominent positions.

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Europe
2:54 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

In Eastern Ukraine, Lines Between Thugs And Freedom Fighters Blur

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 10:29 pm

While Simon Shuster of Time was in a Ukrainian city controlled by pro-Russian separatists, he was at one point hit in the head with a pistol. He describes the experience and the region's status.

Europe
2:54 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Spurning Putin's Calls For Delay, Ukrainian Separatists Forge Ahead

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 5:49 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. In eastern Ukraine, pro-Russian separatists have decided to go ahead with Sunday's referendum on independence. That's despite Russian President Vladimir Putin urging them yesterday to postpone that vote. Here's the self-declared governor in the eastern region of Donetsk earlier today.

VALERY BOLOTOV: (Foreign language spoken)

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Africa
2:54 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Schoolgirl Abduction Is Latest In Nigeria's Sad Lineage Of Kidnappings

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 5:49 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan vowed today that the kidnapping of nearly 300 schoolgirls in that country will be the beginning of the end of terror. In a speech, he also thanked the U.S. and several other countries for offers to help rescue the girls. The teenagers were taken from their boarding school dormitory more than three weeks ago. Since then, other girls have also been kidnapped.

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Education
2:54 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Lately, Title IX Has Made Its Presence Felt Beyond The Playing Field

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 5:49 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In college sports, Title IX is known mostly as a way to ensure women are given the same opportunity as men to participate in sports. What is less known is that the act also requires colleges to prevent sexual assault and violence at their institutions.

NPR's Brian Naylor reports.

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Education
2:54 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

After Stanford Divests From Coal, Activists' Hopes Turn To Harvard

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 5:49 pm

Stanford University's decision to stop direct investments in coal mining companies is encouraging student-led divestment movements at other universities. Chloe Maxmin of Divest Harvard discusses her hopes following Stanford's announcement. Harvard University has the largest university endowment in the U.S.

Education
2:54 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

New Rules Aim To Keep School Doors Open For Undocumented Students

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 5:49 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The Obama administration today reissued guidelines for America's schools. The goal is to keep states from turning away children who cannot prove that they are in the U.S. legally. A 1982 Supreme Court ruling allowed undocumented students free access to a public education. But even today, some school districts haven't gotten the message.

NPR's Claudio Sanchez reports.

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Around the Nation
2:54 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Baffling, Boy-Swallowing Holes Close An Indiana Dune

Rescue gear sits on the sand on Mount Baldy in the Indiana Dunes in July 2013 after a 6-year-old boy was rescued from a mysterious hole that buried him for three hours. Lake Michigan is in the background.
AP

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 5:59 pm

Drive on I-94 just outside Chicago between Gary and Michigan City, Ind., and you catch a glimpse of the massive sand dunes that make up the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. Tucked between coal plants and steel mills, the dunes are as high as 200 feet, stretching along the southernmost tip of Lake Michigan.

These dunes were formed some 14,000 years ago, and most are now covered in forest, says park ranger Bruce Rowe, who has worked at the lake shore for 30 years.

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Around the Nation
2:54 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Auction Marks An End To A History Of Scandal At Tea Pot Dome

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 5:49 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Here's an exchange from the latest season of "Downton Abbey" that referenced a scandal in U.S. history.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SERIES, "DOWNTON ABBEY")

PENELOPE WILTON: (as Isobel Crawley) Is it really called the Teapot Dome Scandal? Seems so unlikely. What's it about?

MAGGIE SMITH: (as Lady Violet Crawley) What is it always about? Bribery and corruption. Taking money to allow private companies to drill for oil on government land.

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Health Care
2:54 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Forecast Predicts A Shift Away From Employer-Sponsored Insurance

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 5:49 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. President Obama's pick to head the Department of Health and Human Services is winning some Republican support. The president chose Sylvia Matthews Burwell to take over from the embattled outgoing secretary, Kathleen Sebelius. And today, Burwell appeared before the Senate Health Committee. That's where Arizona Senator John McCain said she is well qualified to serve as health secretary.

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The Two-Way
2:49 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Vietnam Says Video Proves China Rammed Its Ship

Screen grab of a video purporting to show a Chinese patrol boat ramming a Vietnamese vessel near the Paracel Islands in the South China Sea.
Vietnam Coast Guard

Vietnam's coast guard has released a video it says shows one of its vessels being deliberately rammed by a Chinese patrol craft near the disputed Paracel Islands. It comes on the same day that Beijing reiterated its right to drill for oil in the region of the South China Sea also claimed by Hanoi.

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Shots - Health News
2:47 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Is This Save The Children Ad Too Sexy For The Cause?

Save the Children USA YouTube

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 6:18 am

The sexy male model makes bedroom eyes and says, "Malaria."

The sexy female model twirls her glossy hair in a flirtatious manner and says, "Diarrhea."

It's part of a 2 minute, 17 second public service spot called "The Most Important 'Sexy' Model Video Ever." And no, it's not a spoof.

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The Two-Way
1:37 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Congress Votes To Subpoena VA Chief Shinseki

A House committee on Thursday voted to issue a subpoena to Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki over allegations of delays at VA hospitals that may have caused as many as 40 deaths of patients waiting for care.

In addition to calling Shinseki to testify, lawmakers also subpoenaed records from a Phoenix VA hospital that allegedly maintained an alternate wait list showing that patients waited only a few weeks for treatment when in fact some waited more than a year.

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Concerts
1:31 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Blue Note At 75, The Concert

Dr. Lonnie Smith at the Blue Note 75 concert.
NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 8:37 am

The iconic jazz label Blue Note Records turns 75 this year, and it celebrated in Washington, D.C. As the capstone to a week of performances, film screenings and discussions, Blue Note artists gathered in the 2,465-seat Concert Hall of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts for a special performance.

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The Salt
1:26 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Rice Theory: Why Eastern Cultures Are More Cooperative

It takes a village to grow rice paddies: Taiwanese farmers break a Guinness World Record for the largest number of people planting rice at once in August 2012.
Sam Yeh AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 2:26 pm

Ask Americans to describe themselves, and chances are you'll get adjectives like "energetic," "friendly" or "hard-working."

In Japan, the responses would likely be much different. "Dependent on others" and "considerate" might pop up, studies have found.

Psychologists have known for a long time that people in East Asia think differently, on average, than do those in the U.S. and Europe. Easterners indeed tend to be more cooperative and intuitive, while Westerners lean toward individualism and analytical thinking.

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The Salt
1:05 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Injuries On The Farm Happen Much More Often Than We're Told

Migrant workers harvest corn on Uesugi Farms in Gilroy, Calif., in 2013.
Courtesy of USDA

Farm work has always been one of the most dangerous jobs in America. Government statistics show it clearly, and the people doing the work can attest, too.

But new research from the University of California-Davis suggests that it's a much bigger problem than the federal government recognizes. The health problems faced by agricultural workers are the most undercounted of any industry in the U.S., they say.

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Books
12:59 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Rat Pack's Sammy Davis Jr. Lives On Through Daughter's Stories

Frank Sinatra performing with Dean Martin and Sammy Davis Jr.
Photo: David Sutton MPTV.net RatPac Press & Running Press (The Perseus Books Group)

In his own words, Sammy Davis, Jr. was "the only black, Puerto Rican, one-eyed, Jewish entertainer in the world."

His daughter, Tracey Davis, shares memories and details of his life in her new book, Sammy Davis Jr.: A Personal Journey with My Father. It's based on conversations Davis had with her father as he battled throat cancer near the end of his life.

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The Record
12:42 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Is It Worth It To Work It?

The album cover for Lily Allen's Sheezus goes after multiple targets, including Kanye West (in the album's title) and Queen Elizabeth II (the corgis).
Courtesy of the artist

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