NPR News

Pages

Shots - Health News
1:24 am
Mon May 12, 2014

That Prescription Might Not Have Been Tested For Your Ailment

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:00 pm

It's actually quite common for doctors to write "off label" prescriptions, including using cancer drugs to treat migraine headaches or blood pressure medication for heart failure.

One study found that 1 in 5 prescriptions written in doctor's offices has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat the condition it is being used for. And while some off-label drugs are used with no problems, others may not work or may increase a patient's risk of complications.

Read more
Fine Art
1:23 am
Mon May 12, 2014

One Collector's Plan To Save Realistic Art Was Anything But Abstract

Two pensive women share a mysterious, intense moment in Raphael Soyer's 1980 Annunciation.
Smithsonian American Art Museum

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 12:56 pm

Plenty of collectors want to donate artworks to museums, but the museums don't always welcome them with open arms. "We say 'no thanks' 19 times out of 20," says Betsy Broun, director at the American Art Museum. Sometimes the works aren't museum-quality, other times they don't fit with the museums' philosophy.

Read more
Education
11:17 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Why Aren't Teens Reading Like They Used To?

British Library of Political and Economic Science Flickr

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 8:21 am

Harry Potter and The Hunger Games haven't been big hits for nothing. Lots of teens and adolescents still read quite a lot.

But a roundup of studies, put together by the nonprofit Common Sense Media, shows a clear decline over time. Nearly half of 17-year-olds say they read for pleasure no more than one or two times a year — if that.

That's way down from a decade ago.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:03 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Glenn Greenwald: NSA Believes It Should Be Able To Monitor All Communication

Glenn Greenwald in April, arriving in the U.S. for the first time since documents were disclosed to him by former intelligence analyst Edward Snowden.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 9:12 am

Glenn Greenwald, the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who helped to break stories about mass surveillance in the United States, is making more revelations in a new book coming out Tuesday.

In an interview with NPR's Morning Edition, Greenwald says one of the more "shocking" things he's found is that the National Security Agency physically intercepted shipments of computer hardware, like routers, switches and servers, to outfit them with surveillance equipment.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:10 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Veterans' Success At Home: More Than Just Landing Any Job

Veterans leave the service with high-level skills, like combat medicine, but it's often not easy to turn those skills into credentials for a civilian job.
Brennan Linsley AP

The federal government has spent billions helping veterans get the training and education they need to re-enter the civilian workforce.

Despite the effort, the unemployment rate for vets remains higher than the national average. Aside from dealing with the psychological transition, veterans also have to navigate how to transfer their military skills into civilian ones.

Read more
World
3:11 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

'Nowhere To Go,' Ugandan LGBT Activist Applies For Asylum In U.S.

At a news conference in Boston on May 6, Ugandan LGBT activist John Abdallah Wambere says he is seeking asylum in the U.S.
Josh Reynolds AP

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 4:31 pm

Citing an environment of fear, persecution and anti-gay violence in his home country of Uganda, John Abdallah Wambere has applied for asylum in the United States.

Wambere, 41, came to prominence for his work with Spectrum Uganda Initiatives, an organization that advocates for LGBT rights and provides health and education services.

He announced his decision to seek asylum at a news conference on May 6 in Boston. Wambere is currently living in Cambridge, Mass.

Read more
Television
3:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

'Stand Up Planet' Follows Jokes To Serious Global Issues

As part of the documentary Stand Up Planet, South African comedian Mpho Popps (left) and Indian comedian Aditi Mittal (right) came to Los Angeles to perform with Hasan Minhaj at the Laugh Factory.
Courtesy of StandUpPlanet.org

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 7:45 am

Read more
Author Interviews
3:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

For Artistic Criminal, Breaking Rules Is Key To 'Creativity'

Philippe Petit, a French high-wire artist, walks across a tightrope suspended between the World Trade Center towers in New York on Aug. 7, 1974.
Alan Welner AP

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 8:19 am

Philippe Petit says he hates books on creativity.

So his new book, Creativity: The Perfect Crime, isn't a compilation of ideas from great philosophers or creators.

The wirewalker, magician, street performer and artist breaks that mold with a book full of sketches and personal dialogue that captures his personal creative process.

And because it's so personal, he says, it will be more useful. "I'm not doing any rules. This is not a thesis on creativity. This is a kind of an outlaw confession," he tells NPR's Arun Rath.

Read more
Europe
3:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Eastern Ukraine Muddles Through Voting On Referendums

Separatists in the eastern Ukraine regions of Donetsk and Luhansk asked voters to take part in an unauthorized referendum Sunday on whether to make their region independent.

Around the Nation
3:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Despite Objections, Maine Governor Acts On Food Stamp Fraud

Gov. Paul LePage is using his executive power to push through new photo ID requirements on on Electronic Benefit Transfer cards.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

To combat welfare and food stamp fraud, states across the nation are considering various steps, including requiring photos on Electronic Benefit Transfer cards. Massachusetts and New York are the only states with photo ID programs right now, but they'll soon be joined by Maine, whose Republican governor is using his executive authority to avoid a political battle and start a similar program.

Read more
Music
3:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

In The Studio With Rodrigo Y Gabriela

Rodrigo Y Gabriela's latest album is 9 Dead Alive.
Tina Korhonen Courtesy of the artist

A pair of former heavy metal guitarists who left Mexico for Ireland, Rodrigo y Gabriela developed an acoustic sound that has taken the duo from playing on the streets for change to some of the biggest stages on the festival circuit. Rodrigo Sanchez and Gabriela Quintero joined NPR's Arun Rath in the studio at NPR West to perform a few selections from their latest album, 9 Dead Alive. Hear the music, and their conversation, at the audio link.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:59 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Shelly Sterling Says She'll 'Absolutely' Fight To Keep Her Half Of Clippers

Shelly Sterling, the wife of Donald Sterling owner of the Los Angeles Clippers, watches the Clippers against the Golden State Warriors in Game Four of the Western Conference Quarterfinals during the 2014 NBA Playoffs in Oakland, California.
Thearon W. Henderson Getty Images

Shelly Sterling, the wife of embattled Clippers owner Donald Sterling, tells ABC News she will "absolutely" fight any NBA attempt to oust her as owner.

Shelly owns half of Los Angeles Clippers.

ABC News adds:

Read more
The Two-Way
1:48 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Secretary Of Defense Says Ban On Transgender People Should Be Reviewed

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel says he's open to reviewing the military's ban on transgender service members.

In an interview with ABC News, Hagel said while the issue is more complicated than allowing gays in the military because it requires medical support, the policies "continually should be reviewed."

ABC News reports:

Read more
Author Interviews
12:12 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

'Insatiable': One Woman's Love Affair With The Porn Industry

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 6:03 am

Asa Akira had a happy childhood. The daughter of an upper middle-class family, she attended private schools in New York City and in Japan, where she lived for six years as a child.

"I'm from a very normal family," she tells NPR's Arun Rath. "My parents are still together; nothing dramatic or traumatic has ever happened to me."

After high school, as her peers started careers or went off to college, Akira decided to pursue her dream job: porn star.

Akira says even from an early age, she was both comfortable with her own sexuality and interested in the sex industry.

Read more
Shots - Health News
12:03 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Addicted And Pregnant: 'The Most Heart-Wrenching Experience Of My Life'

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 4:59 am

I bought my first and only pregnancy test when I was 26.

At the time, I had been doing a lot of meth. I was fortunate if I remembered to eat one meal a day. Refilling my birth-control prescription had become just another missed detail in a life that had ceased to have much meaning for me.

I was an addict, and I was staring at two very bright pink lines on a stick.

I showed the test to my boyfriend. "What are we going to do?" I asked. He replied, "Have a baby, I guess."

Read more
The Two-Way
10:03 am
Sun May 11, 2014

Portraits Of Mothers (And The Children Who Love Them)

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 11:14 am

There are a few special days we relish watching unfold on social media. The first day of school is one. Mother's Day is another. We like them because social feeds are filled with photographs that gives us an intimate peek at a very special human connection that resonates across the globe.

On this mother's day, we looked sifted through Instagram and Twitter and pulled out some of our favorite images. Here they are, but before all of that: Happy Mother's Day!

Parallels
9:50 am
Sun May 11, 2014

What Three College Pals Say About Their Dreams In China

Pedestrians walk through the Sanlitun Village shopping district on May 2, in Beijing, China.
Xiao Lu Chu Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 10:51 am

When you think of China, what pops to mind? Superhighways. Bullet trains. Gleaming skyscrapers. Economic growth. A booming middle class. Opportunity.

My friends and I graduated from college five years ago, embarking on lives that we hoped would be full of promise, excitement and opportunity. We all went to Minzu University of China (formerly known as the Central University for Nationalities), a prestigious school in Beijing.

Read more
Asia
9:48 am
Sun May 11, 2014

As India Votes, Muslims Keep A Wary Eye On The Hindu Frontrunner

A group of Muslim men stand aside, waiting for a car convoy carrying candidate Narendra Modi to pass in the streets of Varanasi last week.
Roberto Schmidt AFP/Getty Images

Monday is the final day of voting in India's election, the biggest democratic exercise in the world.

India is home to more than 1 billion people, 13 percent of them Muslims. Their mistrust of Narendra Modi, the Hindu nationalist leader running for prime minister, can tell us a great deal about India, a democratic country with a long history of religious violence between the Muslim minority and the Hindu majority.

Muslims Wary Of A Modi-Run India

Read more
The Two-Way
7:46 am
Sun May 11, 2014

Fighting Resumes In South Sudan, Despite Cease-Fire Agreement

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 11:16 am

A cease-fire deal that was hailed by the international community was broken two days later by more fighting in South Sudan on Sunday.

Quoting a United Nations official, Reuters reports fighting broke out in the town of Bentiu, where both sides fired.

Reuters adds:

Read more
It's All Politics
7:03 am
Sun May 11, 2014

Seeds Of Political Engagement? They're Planted Early

@dbkiesel via Instagram

For some, it was parents or grandparents. For others, it was school elections, field trips to Washington, D.C. or programs like Girls State. Those were the answers we got recently when we asked NPR listeners to share photos and to tell us: who or what got you interested or involved in politics?

We got dozens of responses, and these are some of our favorites, complete with '80s hair and antique campaign buttons.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:52 am
Sun May 11, 2014

WATCH: Michael Sam, Boyfriend React To Draft Pick

Michael Sam runs through drills during the 2014 NFL Combine in Indianapolis, Ind., on Feb. 24. Sam is the first openly gay player to be drafted by the NFL.
USA Today Sports Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 11:41 am

After being drafted by the St. Louis Rams, Michael Sam is poised to become the first openly gay player in the NFL.

Read more
Television
5:36 am
Sun May 11, 2014

The Pains Of Parenting, And Other Life Lessons From Louis C.K.

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 6:49 am

Louis C.K. has made a career in comedy by going places others won't. He can be shockingly crude and deeply insightful in the same sentence.

In his Emmy-award winning TV show called Louie, the comedian basically plays himself — a divorced standup comic in New York with two kids. Season 4 of the show kicked off last week.

Louie is "right where I started him, really," he tells NPR's Rachel Martin. "Some stuff happened, but he ended up back where he was, which sort of is the way things work. It's a zero-sum game, at times."

Read more
Movie Interviews
5:36 am
Sun May 11, 2014

Director Richard Ayoade Holds Up A Dark Looking Glass In 'The Double'

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 9:47 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The new film "The Double" is a comedy and a love story, but a very dark one. It's based off an 1846 Dostoyevsky novella. "The Double" focuses on a guy named Simon James. He is, by all accounts, rather nondescript - the kind of guy who fades, mostly intentionally, into the background. He stammers halfway through sentences, his boss can't remember his name and he can't seem to make any impression on the girl of his dreams. Then one day at work, things get worse when Simon James' boss makes an announcement.

Read more
Author Interviews
5:36 am
Sun May 11, 2014

'Snow In May': The Lives Of Magadan, Gateway To The Gulag

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 9:47 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

There's a town in Russia on the far eastern reaches of the country closer to Alaska than any major Russian city. It's terribly cold, and snow falls late into spring. That place is Magadan, and it's the focal point of a new collection of short stories by Kseniya Melnik. It's called "Snow In May."

Read more
Author Interviews
5:36 am
Sun May 11, 2014

Mothers, The Rich Emotional Centers Of The Movies

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 11:39 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In film, there are all kinds of characters - the hero, the villain, the seductress, the mentor, the damned and the redeemed. And sometimes, all of those are wrapped into one complex role called the mother.

Take a look at many of the great movies in history, and a lot of times, you'll find a maternal figure at the emotional center of the story. Here's Sally Field in "Forrest Gump."

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "FORREST GUMP")

Read more
Religion
5:36 am
Sun May 11, 2014

U.N. Panel Could Find Vatican Guilty Of Torture

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 9:47 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. The Vatican got a grilling this past week for its handling of the clerical sex abuse scandal. The setting - a United Nations hearing in Geneva. Meanwhile in Rome, a new advisory board to Pope Francis held its first meeting on the sex abuse crisis.

Read more
Europe
5:36 am
Sun May 11, 2014

Separatists Hold Referendum On East Ukraine Independence

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 8:56 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Separatists in eastern Ukraine are holding a hastily arranged referendum today on self-rule for the region. The international community has called the vote illegitimate, but it is going ahead nonetheless.

The vote comes several weeks after Russia annexed Crimea after a similar vote. NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is at a polling station in Donetsk. And NPR's Corey Flintoff is in Luhansk They join me now to talk about the vote. Soraya, what are you seeing where you are?

Read more
Middle East
5:36 am
Sun May 11, 2014

In Run-Up To Egyptian Election, A Crackdown On Dissent

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 9:14 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. The presidential campaign in Egypt has kicked off for this month's election. Last night, a few thousand people gathered in Cairo to show their support for Egypt's ex-military chief, Abdel Fattah al-Sisi.

(SOUNDBITE OF RALLY)

MARTIN: Sisi is one of only two candidates in the running. Analysts say he will be the country's next president, and they ask if this election is a step toward democracy or a path back to authoritarian rule.

Read more
Parallels
5:36 am
Sun May 11, 2014

The Squabble That Never Ends: Britain and Spain Duel Over Gibraltar

The Rock of Gibraltar, as seen from the Spanish town of La Linea de la Concepcion, at Spain's southern tip. Gibraltar has been British territory for 301 years, but many Spaniards want it back. Fresh squabbles over fishing rights cropped up recently.
Lauren Frayer NPR

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 11:37 am

One recent morning, a mile-long line of cars waited to cross the international border separating Spain from Britain's Rock of Gibraltar. Spanish border guards were stopping every car, resulting in long lines that could take up to six hours to cross.

Spain said it was checking for tobacco smuggling across the international border. But these increased checks were Spain's retaliation in a spat over fishing rights and access to nearby waters, said Brian Reyes, news editor at the local newspaper, the Gibraltar Chronicle.

Read more
Education
5:36 am
Sun May 11, 2014

Beating The Odds To Become First Female Chief Nuclear Officer

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 9:47 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So that's the picture in academic science, but we wanted to get a sense of whether the issues are similar in the science industries away from academia. To talk about that, we called on one of the highest-ranking women in the nuclear field. Her name is Maria Korsnick. She works for Exelon Nuclear, one of the largest power-generating companies in the U.S. She was the first woman in this country to hold the title of chief nuclear officer. I started by asking her to just explain what that title means.

Read more

Pages