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Shots - Health Blog
1:04 am
Wed September 19, 2012

Ebola's Other Victims: Health Care Workers

A medical worker from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention works at the laboratory where Ebola specimens from the Congo were tested at the start of the latest outbreak.
Stephen Wandera AP

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 6:51 am

The Ebola virus continues to strike people in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Since May, the World Health Organization has counted 72 confirmed, probable or suspected cases and 32 deaths.

As usual, a disproportionate share of those cases are health care workers — 23 of them, almost a third.

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Television
1:03 am
Wed September 19, 2012

Claire Danes: Playing Bipolar Is Serious Business

Claire Danes plays Carrie Mathison in Showtime's Homeland. The second season premieres on Sept. 30.
Kent Smith Showtime

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 9:33 am

The second season is about to start for the Showtime series Homeland, a show whose cast and crew are up for numerous honors at the Emmy Awards Sept. 23.

One of them is Claire Danes, who plays a CIA agent who's become obsessed with the idea that an American hero — a Marine returned home after years of captivity in Iraq — has secretly become an operative for al-Qaida. Danes spoke to NPR's Steve Inskeep about preparing for the part, finding the character's body language and being "a big fat ham."

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Shots - Health Blog
1:02 am
Wed September 19, 2012

Scientists See Upside And Downside Of Sequencing Their Own Genes

Dr. James Watson looks at a reproduction of the structure of DNA, which he helped discover, in this 1962 photograph. Decades later, Watson was one of the first people to have his entire genome sequenced.
Mondadori Mondadori via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 24, 2012 2:03 pm

When scientists were looking for the first person to test a new, superfast way of deciphering someone's entire genetic blueprint, they turned to James Watson the guy who shared a Nobel Prize for discovering the structure of DNA.

"They had to sequence someone, so they got me," he says.

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Education
1:01 am
Wed September 19, 2012

Do Scores Go Up When Teachers Return Bonuses?

An incentive system that gave bonuses to teachers upfront, with the threat of having to give the money back if student performance didn't improve, proved effective in one study.
David Franklin iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 6:47 pm

In Chicago, parents were fuming over a weeklong strike by teachers. Around the rest of the country, in the face of growing evidence that many U.S. students are falling behind, administrators have tried to devise different ways to motivate teachers.

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Sweetness And Light
10:03 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

The Big East Conference: What's In A Name?

Big East commissioner Mike Aresco answers questions from the media before an NCAA college football game. Aresco says there are no plans for the conference to change its name.
Jessica Hill AP

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 6:45 am

All you have to know about the nonsense of college athletic conferences in America today is that the Big Ten has 12 members, and the Big Twelve has 10. Honestly.

But as badly as athletic conferences flunk arithmetic, they do no better with geography. Next year, for example, San Diego State will be in the Big East. This is like, you never could believe that Vladivostok, way out there, was really in Russia, could you?

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It's All Politics
5:40 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Romney Explains Comments Again As GOP Unearths Obama Video

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney speaks at a campaign fundraising event in Salt Lake City on Tuesday.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:39 pm

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney took his effort to contain the damage from the video of his remarks about Americans who don't pay taxes to Fox News Channel Tuesday.

There, he acknowledged that some of those who don't pay federal income taxes are senior citizens and military service members.

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It's All Politics
5:11 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Pa. High Court Orders Judge To Review Voter ID Law

Emily Goldberg holds up a sign during the NAACP voter ID rally opposing Pennsylvania's voter ID law last Thursday in Philadelphia. With her is her 2-year-old daughter, Willa.
Michael Perez AP

Pennsylvania's highest court is returning the state's controversial voter ID law to a lower court judge who must decide whether it will disenfranchise some voters.

NPR's Jeff Brady reports that according to Tuesday's ruling, the lower court judge must block the law from taking effect if he finds voters cannot easily get photo ID cards that the law requires.

The state Supreme Court recognized difficulties in implementing the law under a "relatively short time frame," concluding:

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The Two-Way
5:06 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Obama: As President, You Work Hard For The Entire Country

President Obama responded to Mitt Romney's controversial "47 percent" comments in an interview with David Letterman this afternoon.

"My expectation is that if you want to be president, you have to work for everyone, not just for some," Obama said according to a pool report.

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The Two-Way
4:40 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Did Jesus Have A Wife? Newly Discovered Ancient Text Reignites Debate

The front of the papyrus fragment.
Karen L. King Harvard

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 8:30 am

An ancient piece of text is reviving an equally ancient debate: Was Jesus Christ married?

Of course, most Christians believe that he wasn't. But today, Harvard Professor of Divinity Karen King presented a scrap of papyrus that dates back to the fourth century. She told a gathering of scholars in Rome that written in Coptic was this surprising sentence: "Jesus said to them, 'My wife...' "

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Education
4:29 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Chicago Teachers Union Delegates Vote To End Strike

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:09 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

In Chicago, teachers have suspended their strike. That means teachers and students could be back to class as soon as tomorrow. The strike lasted seven days.

And with us to explain what has transpired in Chicago is NPR's Claudio Sanchez. And, Claudio, teachers, as we've said, have suspended the strike. What has the reaction been?

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Kitchen Window
4:00 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

How To Upset The Apple Cart, Deliciously

Michele Kayal for NPR

Originally published on Thu September 20, 2012 8:28 am

Apples are the onions of the fruit world: abundant, versatile and a friend to almost any flavor. Apples and onions even go well together.

As we enter the thick of fall, apples will tumble from their bins, a harmony of flavors, textures and hues — reds, yellows, browns and greens — that capture the very essence of the season. But when was the last time you thought of using an apple for anything besides pie, applesauce or cider? Maybe you tossed one into a salad. Maybe.

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Digital Life
3:17 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Newsweek's 'Muslim Rage' Cover Mocked On Twitter

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:09 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Speaking of rage, a wave of comments began trending yesterday on Twitter, all including this title called hashtag: Muslim Rage. It was the unintended product of an effort by Newsweek to promote conversation on Twitter about its latest cover story. It's about the protests in the Middle East. The cover featured two bearded men in mid chant, fists in the air under the headline: Muslim Rage. And when Newsweek asked readers to tweet their thoughts, the response was a barrage of satire.

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Asia
3:17 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Aung San Suu Kyi Makes First U.S. Trip In Decades

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:09 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Burmese democracy activist Aung San Suu Kyi is on a landmark trip to the United States, her first in four decades. She is thanking Americans for being friends of the democracy movement in her homeland, Myanmar, also known as Burma. Now, she says, it's time for the U.S. to be friends with the whole country and consider easing sanctions.

The Nobel laureate made her case after a meeting at the State Department, as NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

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Religion
3:16 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Conservative Salafis Find Footing In Muslim World

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:09 pm

As demonstrations continue through the Muslim world over the film mocking Mohammed, fingers have pointed at the Salafis and their role in the violence. The ultraconservative Muslim's influence has grown in recent years following the Arab Spring. Audie Cornish speaks with Robin Wright of the United States Institute of Peace.

Law
3:15 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Court Reverses Ruling On Political Donor Disclosure

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:09 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. The news today wasn't all bad for Mitt Romney and his team. A panel of three federal appeals judges reversed a lower court decision, one that would have required more disclosure of big political donors. As NPR's Peter Overby reports, that threat of disclosure was troubling to pro-Romney outside groups which have far outspent the Romney campaign on television.

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Presidential Race
3:14 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Some Florida Seniors Divided On '47 Percent'

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:09 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The fundraiser where the Romney video was recorded was held in Florida. And today, in that politically important state, reaction was mixed about Romney's unscripted remarks. NPR's Kathy Lohr gathered some views from people at a retirement community.

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Media
3:13 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

How 'Mother Jones' Got The Secret '47 Percent' Video

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:09 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Mother Jones magazine is known for its small but passionate following of liberal readers. And right now, it's getting a huge amount of attention. NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik joins us now for more on Mother Jones and how it got this story. Hi there, David.

DAVID FOLKENFLIK, BYLINE: Hey, Audie.

CORNISH: So this video of Mitt Romney was recorded a while back. Some of the clips were living on YouTube months ago. So what did Mother Jones do to acquire the story and get so much attention for it now?

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Presidential Race
3:11 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Romney Still Doing Damage Control For '47 Percent'

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:09 pm

Anytime a candidate calls an unexpected press conference in the evening, you know it's not good news. We look at the latest news and political fall out from the release of Mitt Romney's remarks at a private fundraiser. The comments were made in May and the recording was released by Mother Jones magazine.

Presidential Race
3:10 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Biden A Vital Surrogate For Obama On Campaign Trail

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:09 pm

Vice President Joe Biden has been an important surrogate for President Obama this year, as he was four years ago. Biden especially excels at connecting with white, working-class voters — a group with which the president has struggled.

Education
3:10 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Chicago Teachers Union Delegates Vote On Contract

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:09 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The teachers Union in Chicago votes later today for the second time on whether to and a strike that has kept 350,000 students and their parents in limbo. On Sunday, the union's House of Delegates voted to continue the weeklong strike until they have more time to read the outline on of a tentative agreement. That vote was a setback for union President Karen Lewis and her bargaining team.

NPR's Claudio Sanchez reports that with the vote pending, some teachers still don't know what's in that agreement.

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National Security
3:09 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

U.S.-Afghan Patrols Halted After Insider Attacks

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:09 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Insider attacks in Afghanistan have killed more than 50 U.S. and allied service members since the beginning of the year. Now they're having an effect on military operations. The American command in Kabul has temporarily halted joint patrols between U.S. and Afghan forces.

As NPR's Tom Bowman explains, that could complicate America's exit strategy, which depends on training Afghans to handle their own security.

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Presidential Race
3:08 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Romney's '47 Percent' Argument Counterproductive

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:09 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Some conservatives have denounced Romney's remarks. The "Weekly Standard's" Bill Kristol called them arrogant and stupid. In the New York Times, David Brooks wrote that it shows Mitt Romney doesn't understand the country or its culture. But others, such as radio personality Rush Limbaugh, have come to the candidate's defense.

(SOUNDBITE OF RADIO BROADCAST)

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Presidential Race
3:07 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Romney Conflated Different Groups With '47 Percent'

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:09 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney admits he could've used more elegant language, but he's not backing down. Romney was secretly recorded speaking at a fundraiser in May and his comments were publicized yesterday by the liberal magazine, "Mother Jones." Here he is telling wealthy backers that President Obama has a built-in base of support.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

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It's All Politics
3:02 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

'Mother Jones' Journalist: Video Not An Attempt To 'Catch Mitt Romney'

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 7:43 am

The Mother Jones journalist behind the release of a surreptitiously shot fundraising video says the source "did not go there looking to catch Mitt Romney in the act."

David Corn, the magazine's Washington bureau chief, tells NPR's Michel Martin on Tell Me More:

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
3:00 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

With Hats And Umbrellas, Senegalese Fill A City Niche

Senegalese vendor Cheikh Fall prepares his stall in front of Brooks Brothers on 51st Street, just off the Avenue of the Americas in New York City. Fall runs an association of Senegalese vendors that deals with the city over licensing and regulations.
Art Silverman NPR

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:09 pm

Careful planning can transform the shape and life of a city. But sometimes, a city's features develop spontaneously — like the immigrant enclaves that grow around certain jobs and trades in urban centers like New York.

Occupational cliches have been a fact of life in the Big Apple for generations. Historically, New Yorkers thought of Jewish tailors, Italian greengrocers or Irish policemen, says Philip Kasinitz, a sociologist with the City University of New York.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:48 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Link Between BPA And Childhood Obesity Is Unclear

Canned food is a source of BPA exposure, but researchers aren't sure whether it causes childhood obesity. Above, the soup isle at a grocery store in Washington, D.C.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:23 pm

BPA could be making kids fat. Or not.

That's the unsatisfying takeaway from the latest study on bisphenol A — the plastic additive that environmental groups have blamed for everything from ADHD to prostate disease.

Unfortunately, the science behind those allegations isn't so clear. And the new study on obesity in children and teens is no exception.

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The Two-Way
2:42 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

In Fox Interview, Romney Doubles Down On '47 Percent' Comments

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 3:31 pm

"This is a message I'm carrying day in and day out and will carry over the coming months."

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The Record
2:14 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Listen To A Long Conversation With Bonnie Raitt

Bonnie Raitt accepts her Lifetime Achievement Award at the Americana Music Awards in Nashville on Sept. 12, 2012.
Susan Bibeau Folk Alley

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 11:12 am

  • Listen to Bonnie Raitt and Ann Powers at the 2012 Americana Music Conference

Last Wednesday I had the enormous privilege of sitting down with the masterful Bonnie Raitt for the keynote conversation at the annual Americana Music Conference and Festival in Nashville. Actually, I stood while blues fusion matriarch sat — I'd aggravated an old back injury moments before we took the stage, and my mentioning this to the crowd set Bonnie up for her first zinger of the chat: "What was his name?" she teased.

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The Two-Way
1:57 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

What Did Jimmy Carter's Grandson Have To Do With The Romney Video?

There is a partisan side to the video that is giving Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney headaches. The man who found the video online and then negotiated its full release was James Carter IV, President Jimmy Carter's grandson.

If you haven't heard by now, the video was released by Mother Jones and it shows Romney talking bluntly about 47 percent of the country, whom he says pay no taxes and think themselves "victims."

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Theater
1:33 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Shorts Inspire Music In 'Sounding Beckett' Trilogy

In Ohio Impromptu, one of three short plays featured in Sounding Beckett, the silent character (Philip Goodwin, left, with Ted van Griethuysen) inspired music based on knocks and repetitions.
Jeremy Tressler Sounding Beckett

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:09 pm

It all began last year, when the Library of Congress presented Samuel Beckett's Ohio Impromptu alongside a piece of music by composer Dina Koston, which responded to the text. A New York group, the Cygnus Ensemble, played the music, while Washington, D.C., director Joy Zinoman staged the play, for one night only.

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