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The Two-Way
8:33 am
Fri November 30, 2012

California Dock Strike Widens, Slows Imports From Asia

Union workers strike at the Port of Los Angeles on Nov. 28, 2012.
Nick Ut AP

A group of unionized clerical workers has effectively shut down much of the operations at the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. The clerical workers, members of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, walked off the job on Wednesday, saying they feared Port officials were outsourcing their jobs.

Their clout grew dramatically yesterday when unionized longshoremen in both cities agreed to honor their picket lines.

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Deceptive Cadence
8:31 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Classical Crib Sheet: Top 5 Stories This Week

The New York Philharmonic performing at the current incarnation of Avery Fisher Hall in January 2011.
Chris Lee courtesy of the New York Philharmonic

Originally published on Mon December 3, 2012 10:08 am

  • Lincoln Center and the New York Phil have confirmed plans for a (long, long overdue) major overhaul of 50-year-old Avery Fisher Hall that "aims to redefine what it means to be a concert hall at a time of challenging orchestra economics and changing audience habits." This will be the third attempt at addressing the venue's acoustical challenges.
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The Salt
7:56 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Mark Rice-Ko: Where Food and Rothko Meet In Delicious Harmony

Chef/Stylist Caitlin Levin and photographer Henry Hargreaves create an interpretation of Mark Rothko's paintings using colored rice.
Henry Hargreaves

Originally published on Tue December 4, 2012 6:36 am

Back in 1958, when Mark Rothko was commissioned to do a series of murals for The Four Seasons restaurant in New York — a place he believed was "where the richest bastards in New York will come to feed and show off" — his acceptance of the assignment was subversive at best. He hoped his art would "ruin the appetite of every son of a [beep] who ever eats in that room," according to a Harper's magazine article, "Mark Rothko: Portrait Of The Artist As An Angry Man."

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The Two-Way
7:55 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Train Derails Near Philadelphia, Some Chemicals Reportedly Spilled

The scene of the derailment today in Paulsboro, N.J., from above.
NBC10 Philadephia

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 8:54 am

There's a developing story this morning from Paulsboro, N.J., south and across the Delaware River from Philadelphia, where several railroad tank cars have derailed and fallen into a creek after a bridge collapse.

It's being reported that the cars were transporting vinyl chloride, which could ignite and would be highly irritating if breathed in. There are local reports of about 18 people being treated for breathing problems.

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The Two-Way
7:12 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Consumer Spending Dipped In October; Superstorm Sandy Blamed

Nov. 17: A sign in a Staten Island storefront tells a lot. It was still closed because of the damage done by Superstorm Sandy in late October.
Mario Tama Getty Images

The economic effects of Superstorm Sandy continue to be felt. According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, consumer spending edged down 0.2 percent in October from September, and personal income dipped 0.1 percent.

As Bloomberg News says, "Sandy kept some in the Northeast from getting to work or from shopping at malls and car dealerships."

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Hardcover Nonfiction Bestsellers
7:03 am
Fri November 30, 2012

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Nonfiction, Week Of November 29, 2012

David Nasaw's The Patriarch offers insight into the life of Joseph P. Kennedy. It debuts at No. 12.

The Two-Way
6:53 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Today's Three Stories To Read About The 'Fiscal Cliff'

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner as he arrived at the Capitol on Thursday for negotiations with congressional leaders.
Alex Wong Getty Images

The White House and congressional leaders continue to talk about taxes, spending cuts and how to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff that arrives at midnight Dec. 31 — when Bush-era tax cuts are set to expire and automatic spending cuts are set to go into effect.

As NPR and others cover the story, we'll try to to point to interesting reports and analyses. Here are three of the latest.

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The Two-Way
6:10 am
Fri November 30, 2012

In Egypt: Draft Of Constitution OK'd; Protesters Return To Tahrir Square

A protester shouts early Friday in Cairo's Tahrir Square.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 6:25 am

Protesters have streamed into Cairo's Tahrir Square again today, correspondent Merrit Kennedy tells our Newscast Desk.

She says they're there both to demonstrate again against President Mohammed Morsi's decree giving himself sweeping new powers and to express concern about a draft constitution passed early today by Egypt's constitutional assembly.

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The Two-Way
5:43 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Woman's Sad Story About Missing Hat Touches Many Hearts, Goes Viral

Bridget Hughes and her hat, before it went missing.
Facebook.com

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 7:17 am

  • From 'Morning Edition'

The major news stories of the day are pretty much the same as they've been all week: Budget talks continue in Washington; Egypt continues its slow, sometimes violent transition; fighting rages in Syria.

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Strange News
5:05 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Toilet-Paper Thief Returns 80 Rolls To University

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The holidays bring out the spirit of giving and giving back what you've pilfered. Recently, we told you about a 1930s teapot returned to the Waldorf Astoria. This morning: a tale of toilet paper. Eastern New Mexico University received a gift box filled with 80 rolls of toilet paper and a Christmas card apologizing for stealing rolls from a dorm years ago. Another inspiring holiday moment, or another TP prank? It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Digital Life
5:05 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Woman Turns To Facebook To Help Find Beloved Hat

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Business
4:09 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Are 'Pac-Man,' 'Tetris' Art? MOMA Says Yes

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 5:05 am

Sim City is also among the first 14 titles in the Museum of Modern Art's new video game collection. The New York City museum's website says video games are not only art, they're design. And design is among the selection criteria — along with cultural relevance. MOMA hopes to have about 40 titles when the exhibit opens in March.

Business
4:00 am
Fri November 30, 2012

European Bank Chief: 2013 Will Be Better For Euro

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 5:05 am

The president of the European Central Bank said Friday that the eurozone has yet to emerge from its economic crisis but is on a path to see a recovery by the second half of 2013. But there are still many challenges. Just after that interview, new numbers showed unemployment in the euro zone rose to a record 11.7 percent in October.

Television
3:04 am
Fri November 30, 2012

The NFL's New Target Demographic: Kids

Eleven-year-old Ish Taylor is charged with protecting the NFL — and the world — from a scheming supervillain in NFL Rush Zone: Season of the Guardians.
Nickelodeon

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 5:05 am

When the NFL wants to make a play for a particular demographic, they go long. To attract Latinos, it forged partnerships with Univision and Telemundo. To keep women happy, it came out with a clothing line featuring shirts that actually fit better than those boxy jerseys.

Now, to engage children, the NFL is going where kids go: Nickelodeon. NFL Rush Zone: Season of the Guardians is a new series rolling out Friday, co-branded by the NFL and Nicktoons.

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It's All Politics
3:04 am
Fri November 30, 2012

How Much Income Taxes Could Rise: A Breakdown Of The Options

House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill Thursday after private talks with Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 8:46 am

"No substantive progress has been made." That's what House Speaker John Boehner had to say Thursday about efforts to avoid automatic spending cuts and tax increases at year's end.

The administration's lead negotiator, Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner, met with congressional leaders from both sides of the aisle Thursday, looking for an agreement on the hazard Congress and the White House created last year to focus their minds on deficit reduction.

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Around the Nation
3:04 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Native Americans To Soon Receive Settlement Checks

Elouise Cobell, a member of Montana's Blackfeet Tribe, and four other Native Americans led a class-action land use lawsuit against the U.S. government. Cobell is shown here in 2009 with Interior Secretary Ken Salazar after an announcement on the settlement of the lawsuit. Cobell died last year.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 5:05 am

Federal officials are working to send out $1,000 checks in the next few weeks to hundreds of thousands of Native Americans. The money stems from a settlement of the Cobell case, a landmark $3.4 billion settlement over mismanagement of federal lands held in trust for Native American people.

The case was brought by Elouise Cobell, a member of Montana's Blackfeet Tribe, and four other Native Americans in 1996.

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Law
3:04 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Federal 'Compassionate' Prison Release Rarely Given

A new report says federal prison officials rarely grant "compassionate release," even for the most gravely ill inmates.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 5:05 am

Back in 1984, Congress gave authorities the power to let people out of federal prison early, in extraordinary circumstances, like if inmates were gravely ill or dying. But a new report says the Federal Bureau of Prisons blocks all but a few inmates from taking advantage of "compassionate release."

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NPR Story
3:04 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Idaho's Rep. Labrador On Immigration Jobs Bill

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 6:06 am

Renee Montagne talks with Rep. Raul Labrador, Republican from Idaho and one of the congressmen who introduced the bill that's set for a vote Friday. The STEM Jobs Act allows people who are in the U.S. legally who are getting advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering and math to stay and get their green cards, he says.

NPR Story
3:04 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Golf's Storied St. Andrews Old Course Gets Facelift

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 5:05 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:04 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Egypt's Constitution Vote Mired In Controversy

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 5:05 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And in Egypt, a panel of Islamist lawmakers has approved a new draft constitution, but what should have been a welcome step in the country's transition to democracy is instead mired in controversy. NPR's Leila Fadel has our story from Cairo.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

PRESIDENT MOHAMMED MORSI: (Foreign language spoken)

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Research News
3:04 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Victory Or Defeat? Emotions Aren't All In The Face

Can You Tell Emotion From Faces Alone? A new study suggests that when people evaluated just facial expressions — without cues from the rest of the body — they couldn't tell if the face was showing a positive or negative emotion. Enlarge this photo to see the answers.
Hillel Aviezer The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 6:20 pm

Photos of athletes in their moment of victory or defeat usually show faces contorted with intense emotion. But a new study suggests that people actually don't use those kinds of extreme facial expressions to judge how a person is feeling.

Instead, surprisingly, people rely on body cues.

Hillel Aviezer, a psychology researcher at Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel, wanted to see how accurately people can read intense, real-world facial expressions — instead of the standardized, posed images of facial expressions that are usually used in lab tests.

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Politics
3:04 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Fiscal Cliff Debate Moves To TV, In Ad War

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 5:05 am

Just when you thought you never had to look at another political ad, they're back — this time focused on the big debate in Washington about taxes and spending. Unions, business groups and other special interests have taken their arguments to the nation's living rooms and computer screens.

Politics
3:04 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Republicans Bristle At Obama's Tax, Spending Plan

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 5:05 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

A high stakes negotiation that got underway two weeks ago on a congenial note has turned acrimonious. We're talking about the effort by the White House and Congress to avoid those automatic tax hikes and sweeping spending cuts that kick in on January 1st. The top two Republicans on Capitol Hill are flatly rejecting what the White House proposed to them yesterday. NPR's David Welna has the story.

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Middle East
3:04 am
Fri November 30, 2012

U.N.'s Palestine Vote: Symbolic Or Game-Changer?

Originally published on Thu December 13, 2012 6:41 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And a very different emotion on the West Bank, where Palestinians are reveling today in their new status as a non-member observer state in the United Nations. What that change means depends on who's talking. NPR's Philip Reeves was in the West Bank city of Ramallah, as the vote was announced.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC, CROWD CHATTER)

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Middle East
3:04 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Damascus Remains Cut Off By Fighting

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 5:05 am

For a second day, the Syrian capital, Damascus is cut off from the outside world, with the international airport shut, the Internet down and mobile phone lines working sporadically. There are reports of fierce clashes around the capital and heavy airstrikes in the capital's suburbs and in the northern city of Aleppo.

Planet Money
3:04 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Why Mexico Is The World's Biggest Exporter Of Flat-Screen TVs

Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 9:04 am

Most of the news we hear about Mexico these days is about drug-related violence. But it turns out there's another, brighter story there: The country's economy has been growing at a solid pace for the past couple years, driven in large part by solid exports.

Among other things, Mexico is the world's largest exporter of flat-screen TVs. There are a lot of factories just south of the U.S. border, filled with workers putting together televisions. The individual parts come from Asia, but the final assembly is done in Mexico.

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Law
3:04 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Senate Committee OKs Electronic Privacy Measure

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 5:22 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Senate Judiciary Committee voted yesterday to make it a little harder for police to read your old emails. It's something privacy groups and tech companies have wanted for years. As NPR's Martin Kaste reports, law enforcement groups are less pleased.

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Sports
3:04 am
Fri November 30, 2012

How David Beckham Changed U.S. Soccer

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 5:05 am

Five years after his much-hyped arrival in the United States, David Beckham is playing his last game for the L.A. Galaxy on Saturday. David Greene speaks with Los Angeles Times sportswriter Kevin Baxter about whether Beckham lived up to America's expectations.

Business
3:04 am
Fri November 30, 2012

N.Y. Fast-Food Workers Strike For Better Wages

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 5:05 am

Fast-food workers staged protests Thursday at restaurants in New York. The workers said their low wages need to be raised. But with the economy still slow, restaurant managers are determined to hold down labor costs so they can offer dollar foods.

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