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Economy
4:30 am
Mon December 24, 2012

Could 2013 Be A Good Economic Year?

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 4:53 am

Nariman Behravesh, chief economist of IHS Global Insight, talks to Steve Inskeep about his economic forecasts for 2013. Among his predictions: the U.S. recovery will gradually pick up steam. Unless it falls off a cliff — then a recession will probably be unavoidable.

Middle East
4:30 am
Mon December 24, 2012

Syria Airstrike Update

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 5:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

International envoy Lakhdar Brahimi met with Syrian leaders today hoping to solve that country's bloody conflict, but the bloodshed goes on. There are reports of explosions in Damascus today, government forces are battling rebel fighters, and civilians continue to perish in large numbers. The relentless violence, including an airstrike yesterday on a bakery, is draining hope for any diplomatic solution. NPR's Peter Kenyon filed this report from Istanbul.

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Asia
4:30 am
Mon December 24, 2012

Indians Demonstrate Against Gang Rape

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 4:45 am

Police in the Indian capital New Delhi had to break up a second day of protests Sunday. Hundreds of people were demonstrating against the gang rape and beating of a 23-year-old student on a bus.

Business
4:30 am
Mon December 24, 2012

The Tax Deduction That Costs $180 Billion A Year

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 5:14 am

Morning Edition's series, the Twelve Days of Tax Deductions, zeroes in on some of the tax breaks lawmakers are grappling with as they hammer out a budget deal, to raise revenue, cut spending and avoid the end-of-year "fiscal cliff." On Day 11, we look at the deduction for employer sponsored health insurance.

Author Interviews
4:25 am
Mon December 24, 2012

Oscar-winner Emma Thompson Revives 'Peter Rabit'

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 4:34 am

After more than 80 years, Emma Thompson's The Further Tale of Peter Rabbit brings Beatrix Potter's beloved character back for a romp around the Scottish countryside — and lots of rule breaking. Thompson says Peter Rabbit's "disrespect for authority" is one of the things she loves about him. (This piece initially aired on October 11, 2012 on Morning Edition.)

Around the Nation
4:25 am
Mon December 24, 2012

Storied Cajun Record Shop Is Going Out Of Business

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 4:30 am

Record shops have been closing across the country in recent years, victims of the digital music revolution. But the closing of Floyd's Record Shop in Ville Platte, La., is different. For 56 years, Floyd's hasn't just sold records, it has helped revitalize Cajun music. Floyd's is closing its doors for good on Christmas Eve.

Europe
4:25 am
Mon December 24, 2012

In Cornwall, Lisa Simpson Rivals Queen Elizabeth

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 4:41 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, while our politicians are consumed with the deficit deadline, many leaders around the world are taking a step back, putting quill to paper and carefully composing their Christmas messages. In Britain, particular attention will be paid to Queen Elizabeth's message, because this year she's celebrating 60 years on the throne.

NPR's Philip Reeves sent this letter, musing about what it meant to be British as 2012 comes to a close.

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Around the Nation
4:25 am
Mon December 24, 2012

Gun Ownership Is A 'Responsiblity To Be Proud Of'

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 4:30 am

Following the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut, the debate over gun control has been reignited. Many have said that if there is going to be any action on gun control, law-abiding, responsible gun owners will need to be a part of the conversation. Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep talks to Steven Rinella, a writer and avid hunter, about how he views the current debate.

Analysis
4:25 am
Mon December 24, 2012

Time To Address 'Fiscal Cliff' Narrows

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 5:27 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

It is Christmas Eve, a time for good will towards all, for peace on Earth, for setting aside differences. Well, maybe that's not true for everyone this year. On Friday, Congress went home without settling their differences over how to avoid the spending decreases and tax increases known as the fiscal cliff.

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Political Junkie
4:08 am
Mon December 24, 2012

Remembering Those Who Left Us In 2012

Ken Rudin collection

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 12:43 pm

In political terms, 2012 was not the greatest of years. We witnessed an ugly, personal, petty, and often childish presidential election. Living in a "battleground" or "swing" state often meant being bombarded 24/7 by an incessant barrage of negative campaign commercials. And just as we were finally emerging from the campaign, we ended the year with an unfathomable tragedy, the gunning down of 20 children at an elementary school in Connecticut.

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Around the Nation
3:09 am
Mon December 24, 2012

DUI Charge: Jan. 4 Court Date For Idaho Sen. Crapo

Republican U.S. Sen. Michael Crapo of Idaho was arrested early Sunday morning and charged with driving under the influence in a Washington, D.C., suburb, authorities said. The booking photo was provided by the police department in Alexandria, Va.
AP

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 3:18 am

A conservative U.S. senator from Idaho who has said he doesn't drink because of his Mormon faith has been charged with drunken driving.

Sen. Michael Crapo, a three-term Republican with a reputation as a social and fiscal conservative, registered a blood alcohol content of .11 percent after police pulled his car over in this suburb south of Washington, D.C., authorities said.

The 61-year-old lawmaker, who faces a court date Jan. 4, apologized in a statement issued hours after his arrest early Sunday.

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Shots - Health News
1:21 am
Mon December 24, 2012

Chance To Pause Biological Clock With Ovarian Transplant Stirs Debate

Sherman Silber, a surgeon at the Infertility Center of St. Louis, offers women a procedure that he claims will put their biological clocks on ice.
Courtesy of Infertility Center of St. Louis

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 7:34 pm

When Sarah Gardner was 34, she started getting really worried about whether she'd ever have kids.

"I bought this kit online that said that they could tell you your ovarian reserve," Gardner, now 40, says. These kits claim they can tell women how long their ovaries will continue producing eggs and how much time they have left to get pregnant.

"Well, mine said, 'we advise really you have a baby now.' Well, sadly that letter arrived three weeks after I just split up with my long-term partner. So, yeah, it opened a massive can of worms really," she says.

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Shots - Health News
1:20 am
Mon December 24, 2012

Like Girls, Boys Are Entering Puberty Earlier

According to a study published in Pediatrics, boys are entering puberty six months to two years earlier than they did in past studies.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed December 26, 2012 9:23 am

It's been known for a while that girls start puberty earlier than they did in the past, sometimes as young as 7 or 8. But it's been unclear whether boys also go through puberty earlier. Now, a study from the American Academy of Pediatrics helps answer that question.

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The Salt
1:18 am
Mon December 24, 2012

At Christmas, A Roman Holiday Revolves Around The Food

Christmas chocolate and sweets on display at a Christmas market at Piazza Navona on Dec. 20 in Rome.
Alberto Pizzoli AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 9:05 am

The city of Rome may be the seat of the Roman Catholic Church, but as far as bright, glitzy decorations, Christmas there has always been a rather sober affair.

And yet at Christmastime, there's one area where Romans pull out all the stops — the dinner table.

Even with the economic crisis, outdoor markets, grocery shops and fishmongers are crowded with customers.

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NPR's Holiday Favorites
1:17 am
Mon December 24, 2012

David Sedaris Reads From His 'Santaland Diaries'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 4:30 am

You might not expect "Santa's Helper" to be a career-altering gig, but for David Sedaris, it changed everything. The writer and humorist spent a season working at Macy's as a department store elf. He described his short tenure as Crumpet the Elf in "The Santaland Diaries," an essay that he read on Morning Edition in 1992.

Instantly, a classic was born. Sedaris' reading has become an NPR holiday tradition. Click the "Listen" link above to hear Sedaris read his tale.

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Shootings In Newtown, Conn.
1:16 am
Mon December 24, 2012

Toy Donations Pour Into Newtown For The Holidays

Christmas stockings with the names of shooting victims hang from a railing in the Sandy Hook village of Newtown, Conn.
Julio Cortez AP

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 11:48 am

The Monday after the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn., toys and stuffed animals began arriving by the truckload. Ten days later, the gymnasium at Edmond Town Hall in the center of Newtown is full of them.

"When I realized that it was getting so large, I thought that we should get this to the children before the holidays," says Ann Benore, a caseworker for Newtown Social Services.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
3:02 pm
Sun December 23, 2012

The Movie Guy Raz Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Jack Black in Richard Linklater's School of Rock
Andrew Schwartz PARAMOUNT

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 11:43 am

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

On his last day hosting weekends on All Things Considered, Guy Raz tells us about the movie that he could watch a million times, Richard Linklater's School of Rock.

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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Sun December 23, 2012

Mug Shot Websites Charge When You're Charged, For Now

Philip Kaplan and Debra Jo Lashaway were both arrested, then cleared of their charges. Their court files were sealed, effectively removing the arrests from their public record, but their mug shots linger on websites that make money by charging people to remove their arrest photos. Now, they're part of a lawsuit that argues their right to publicity has been violated.
Courtesy of Scott Ciolek

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 11:43 am

In August 2011, Debbie Jo Lashaway was charged with theft. She was arraigned and booked in Lucas County, Ohio, and her mug shot was taken.

Seven months later, the charges were dismissed and her record was sealed — effectively removing the theft charge from her public record. Six months after that, she even won a judgment against the man who accused her of theft, declaring the charge bogus and awarding her thousands of dollars in damages.

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Middle East
3:02 pm
Sun December 23, 2012

Sifting Through Conspiracy: A Look At Yasser Arafat's Death

Originally published on Sun December 30, 2012 6:34 am

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And if you're just tuning in, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

Former Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat was buried under so many feet of concrete in 2004 that it took gravediggers six hours to get to his body last month. And his body was exhumed because his widow suspects he was murdered, poisoned by the radioactive element polonium 210.

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Asia
3:02 pm
Sun December 23, 2012

Hitler's Hot In India

A clothing store in Ahmadabad, India, sparked controversy earlier this year, as reporter David Shaftel reports in Bloomberg Businessweek. The city tore down the store's name in October, flummoxing the owners who refused to change it.
Ajit Solanki AP

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 11:42 am

All over India, an unusual name has been popping up on signs in restaurants and businesses: Hitler.

Yes, Hitler. As in Adolph. Just last year there was even a Punjabi movie called Hero Hitler in Love.

To understand why a name generally associated with mass murder is turning up on storefronts around the country, reporter David Shaftel investigated and wrote about it in a recent issue of Bloomberg Businessweek.

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Business
3:02 pm
Sun December 23, 2012

When The Glass Ceiling Is A Baby: Working Through Motherhood

Defense Undersecretary for Policy Michele Flournoy talks with Marines Lt. Gen. John Paxton on Capitol Hill in 2010. Flournoy has since left her position to spend more time with her three children.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 11:44 am

Among the candidates President Obama may nominate for the next defense secretary is Michele Flournoy, formerly the highest-ranking woman in the Pentagon.

Flournoy is a mother of three, and in February, she stunned her colleagues when she stepped down from her job as undersecretary of defense for policy to spend more time with her children.

It wasn't an easy decision, but it's a dilemma that many working mothers face. While some call for changes in workplace policy to make caring for families and working easier, others argue women ultimately have to make a choice.

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Music
3:02 pm
Sun December 23, 2012

A Musical Montage, As Hosted By Guy Raz

On his last day as the host of weekends on All Things Considered before moving to NPR's TED Radio Hour, Guy Raz looks back at some of his memorable music interviews from the past 3 1/2 years.

The Two-Way
9:59 am
Sun December 23, 2012

Syrian Airstrikes Hit Bakery: 'Piles Of Bodies'

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 11:42 am

Syrian activists are reporting that a government airstrike has killed tens of people at a bakery near the central city of Hama.

A video posted by anti-regime activists could not be verified, but shows a mass of rubble and bodies in front of a charred building. Rescuers shout as they look for survivors among the dead.

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Politics
4:48 am
Sun December 23, 2012

Fiscal Cliff, Gun Debate Looms As Lawmakers Take Holiday Break

Originally published on Sun December 23, 2012 10:41 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Could eggnog be the antidote to the looming fiscal cliff? President Obama expressed this very hope as he left town for Christmas in Hawaii on Friday, saying maybe eggnog and Christmas cookies could put lawmakers in a more cooperative mood in time to prevent the automatic tax hikes and spending cuts set to take effect with the new year. The president said lawmakers might also benefit from a short cooling-off period outside the partisan pressure cooker here in Washington.

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Energy
4:48 am
Sun December 23, 2012

Forget Fracking: 2012 Was A Powerful Year For Renewables

Wind turbines stand alongside an electrical tower at the National Wind Technology Center, run by the U.S. Department of Energy, outside Boulder, Colo.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Mon January 7, 2013 9:44 am

Natural gas may have reshaped the domestic energy market in 2012, lowering energy prices and marginalizing the coal industry, but America's shale boom hasn't undermined renewables.

In fact, while analysts were paying attention to fracking this year, a record number of solar panels were being slapped on roofs — enough to produce 3.2 gigawatts of electricity.

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The Two-Way
4:48 am
Sun December 23, 2012

Is That A Dancer Or A Traffic Cop? Wait, He's Both

Retired police officer Tony Lepore performs his dance routine while directing traffic in 2004 in downtown Providence, R.I.
Darren McCollester Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 11:46 am

Christmas means time for family, presents, cookies and of course, holiday traffic. All over the country, traffic cops are working overtime to keep the roads safe for last-minute shoppers.

For nearly 30 years, Tony Lepore has worked as one of those cops in Providence, R.I. But he doesn't just beckon, wave and blow a whistle; he dances — and he's got some serious moves.

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U.S.
4:48 am
Sun December 23, 2012

For Soldiers, There's No Cheeseburgers In Foxholes

Originally published on Sun December 23, 2012 10:41 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Music News
3:28 am
Sun December 23, 2012

In Toronto, An Ad-Hoc Choir Becomes A Community

Choir! Choir! Choir! performs at the Toronto venue Lee's Palace, led by Daveed Goldman (left, with guitar) and Nobu Adilman.
Joseph Fuda

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 11:45 am

Let's say you live in Canada — say, Toronto — and you like to sing. You're not in a band, you don't get asked to sing at weddings, but singing just kind of makes you happy. Well, every Tuesday night at a local bar, you'll find a crowd of people just like you, singing their hearts out.

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Music News
3:25 am
Sun December 23, 2012

Ernie K-Doe: A One-Hit Weirdo's Rise, Fall And Redemption

Ernie K-Doe and his fans at the Warehouse in New Orleans in 1974.
Michael P. Smith The Historic New Orleans Collection

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 11:33 am

Even in a city known for its eccentrics, Ernie K-Doe was in another dimension. The New Orleans musician always knew — and said, loudly — that he was special. And for one week in a life of wild ups and downs, he managed to pierce the national consciousness with a chart-topping hit: 1961's "Mother in Law."

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U.S.
3:11 am
Sun December 23, 2012

New Lives Emerge From Colo. Wildfire Ashes, Still Scarred

Janet Wilson describes the charred hillsides above her old home as "a vast area of toothpicks." She found the scene too sad to return to.
Megan Verlee for NPR

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 11:44 am

West of the city of Colorado Springs, trees charred by the summer's wildfire scar the steep foothills. The Waldo Canyon fire destroyed more than 300 homes in June.

Now, that devastated neighborhood is coming back to life, with construction workers swarming over half-completed houses. While many of its former residents are preparing to move back, some just want to move on.

In the days after the fire devoured their homes, shell-shocked residents tried to wrap their minds around what had just happened to them.

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