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The Two-Way
6:23 am
Thu January 3, 2013

Top Stories: Sandy Hook Students Back In School; 2012 Layoffs Declined

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 6:48 am

Good morning, here are our early stories:

With Those Lost In Mind, Sandy Hook Students And Staff Return To Classes.

Pace Of Layoffs Slowed Sharply In 2012.

And here are more early headlines:

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Around the Nation
5:44 am
Thu January 3, 2013

Kid Convinced He Bought $50,000 Car On eBay

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Don't play with the iPad if Mom tells you not to, especially if Mom's a prankster. Eight-year-old Kenyon was looking at a car on eBay. Mom told him he accidentally bought it for $50,000.

KENYON: Is that true? Did I?

MOM: I'm afraid so.

GREENE: She posted his reaction on YouTube.

KENYON: It was a Mustang. I didn't mean to buy it.

Asia
5:38 am
Thu January 3, 2013

In China, Yellow Is The New Red

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

You've seen this happen, maybe done it yourself. You approach an intersection, the light turns yellow, but instead of slowing to a stop, you accelerate and blow through. Chinese authorities have now outlawed this practice. New rules say yellow is the new red. It means stop. The change has prompted vocal protest, even at the official Chinese news agency. One Chinese critic says the new rules are contrary to Newton's First Law about momentum.

The Two-Way
5:34 am
Thu January 3, 2013

With Those Lost In Mind, Sandy Hook Students And Staff Return To Classes

Early Thursday morning, a school bus carrying students from Sandy Hook Elementary headed to their new school.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 12:49 pm

  • Jean Cochran reporting on the NPR Newscast

(Scroll down for updates. Our most recent was at 2:45 p.m. ET.)

Hoping that they have done their best to create "a safe and a secure learning environment for these kids," school officials in Connecticut today welcomed the 500 or so surviving students from Sandy Hook Elementary School and their teachers back to class.

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All Songs Considered
5:03 am
Thu January 3, 2013

First Watch: Angel Olsen's 'Tiniest Seed' In 16mm

Angel Olsen from the film 'Tiniest Seed'
Pitch Perfect PR

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 5:36 pm

"A transatlantic collaboration between four friends. Two songs were written and recorded in Chicago and then sent to Vienna. There they were translated into a film score."

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Best Books Of 2012
5:03 am
Thu January 3, 2013

Well-Versed: Five Poets With Punch

Nishant Choksi

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 7:58 am

Looking over this past year, it may help to think of this list less as a "best of" than a shoutout to five poets whose work you may know — or should if you don't. All these recent books seem to me deeply personal, but not simply so — they manage to make metaphor from what happened, which is after all one of the poet's chief jobs. Here are five books of transformation, channeling love, loss, history and language.

It's All Politics
4:45 am
Thu January 3, 2013

Was Boehner's Fiscal Cliff End Run Past GOP The New Normal?

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio (right), and Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., enter a Republican caucus meeting at the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

By letting the House take up the Senate's fiscal cliff-dodging legislation that raises income tax rates on the wealthiest earners, Speaker John Boehner answered affirmatively a question that had been on many minds: Would he allow an up-or-down floor vote on a bill opposed by most fellow House Republicans?

Until the New Year's Day vote, Boehner had generally operated the House under what was known as the Hastert Rule. Named for former Speaker Dennis Hastert, it required a "majority of the majority" to support legislation before the speaker approved a floor vote.

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Around the Nation
4:27 am
Thu January 3, 2013

Mackinac Island Worries About Preserving Main St.

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 4:47 am

Michigan's Mackinac Island was fought over by France, England and the United States. The 200-year-old city in northern Lake Huron is a popular tourist destination. But the demolition of old buildings has raised a fierce debate about how to hold onto the past while profiting from it.

Around the Nation
3:30 am
Thu January 3, 2013

Farmers Frustrated By Farm Bill Extension

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 5:09 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

Farmers and ranchers across this country expected to start the year with a new farm bill in place. This is an important piece of legislation to many people. It sets agricultural policy for the next five years.

Read more
Analysis
3:30 am
Thu January 3, 2013

Does John Boehner Cause Problems For Himself?

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 5:02 am

Steve Inskeep talks to Robert Costa, Washington editor of the National Review, about the trials of House Speaker John Boehner. What makes it hard for Boehner to control the Republican caucus?

Around the Nation
3:30 am
Thu January 3, 2013

Wind Power Changes Landscape In Multiple Ways

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 5:22 am

The "fiscal cliff" deal leaves in place tax subsidies for the wind power industry for at least one more year. Windmills have dramatically changed the picture of the Midwest. Wind has also changed the landscape economically and politically.

Business
3:30 am
Thu January 3, 2013

Skirmishes Over Taxes, Spending Are Ahead

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 4:54 am

David Greene talks to Wall David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal, about what the "fiscal cliff" deal did not accomplish, and what fiscal tasks face the new Congress.

Business
3:30 am
Thu January 3, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 5:28 am

The credit-ratings agency Moody's said this weeks' deficit reduction deal did not produce "meaningful improvement" to the issue at hand. That issue: the debt burden and economic output. Moody's warned that if improvements were not made, the agency could downgrade the U.S. credit rating.

Television
3:30 am
Thu January 3, 2013

Al Gore's Current TV Sold To Al Jazeera

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 4:49 am

The acquisition gives Al Jazeera, which is financed by the Qatari government, access to an American TV audience. The new channel, Al Jazeera America, will be based in New York. Current TV was founded in 2004 by former Vice President Al Gore.

Africa
3:27 am
Thu January 3, 2013

Boxing Helps Former Congo Soldiers Move On

Balezi Bagunda, who boxes under the name "Kibomango," lost one eye while fighting in a rebel militia he joined as a child. Now he trains other former child soldiers and street boys in the art of boxing and automobile mechanics.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 6:25 pm

The eastern Congo in Africa has been mired in conflict for decades. But in one corner of the city of Goma, men are trying to heal the scars of war by becoming a different type of fighter. Here, it's jabs and uppercuts that are flying instead of grenades and bullets.

At 6 a.m., even the streets of Goma have a sense of peace about them. Music spills from the storefront churches, and the normally terrifying motorcycle taxis offer a discounted "first customer" fare.

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Business
3:27 am
Thu January 3, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 5:35 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And that brings us to today's last word in business: melty money.

The Bank of Canada released new hundred dollar bills in 2011. The high-tech bank notes are made of polymers. They're sort of like plastic bills. The goal was to make them indestructible. They were put through a lot of tests. They were put through the wash, frozen, boiled. But some Canadians who have their hands on the money say the plastic bills melt when subjected to extreme heat.

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Economy
2:59 am
Thu January 3, 2013

What Is A Good Unemployment Number, Really?

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 4:50 am

On Friday, new unemployment numbers will be released for December. In last month's report, the unemployment rate dropped to 7.7 percent, a four-year low. For a preview of the labor market prospects for the new year, Steve Inskeep talks to Nariman Behravesh, chief economist at IHS Global Insight, an international consulting firm.

It's All Politics
1:27 am
Thu January 3, 2013

After Upset Win, House Freshman Looks To Make A Name For Himself

Then-candidate Eric Swalwell speaks as Rep. Pete Stark, D-Calif., walks offstage during an endorsement meeting at the Alameda County Democratic Lawyers Club in Oakland, Calif., in September.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 4:27 am

A 32-year-old Bay Area prosecutor will be sworn in to Congress on Thursday after ousting a 40-year incumbent.

California Democrat Eric Swalwell — who will be the second-youngest member of Congress — capitalized on his opponent's gaffes and used old-fashioned door-knocking and high-tech mobile phone outreach to win votes.

His first challenge in Washington might be getting people to pronounce his name correctly. Even senior members of California's congressional delegation have gotten it wrong, saying "Stallwell" instead of "Swalwell."

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Around the Nation
1:26 am
Thu January 3, 2013

Hurricane Sandy Brings One Family Closer

The day after their neighborhood was flooded, the Hardys returned to their house to start bagging up the garbage. The contents of the fridge were spread all over the kitchen floor and even outside. There were sausages in the street. The kitchen floor was a mess of muddy puddles.
Courtesy of Heather Hardy

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 6:26 am

The Hardy family goes back generations in a tiny neighborhood called Gerritsen Beach at the southern end of Brooklyn. For them, Superstorm Sandy has created something like an extended family reunion.

Their 2 1/2 bedroom house is currently just barely livable. They removed a fallen tree, replaced drywall, fixed the electricity and heat, and threw down rugs to keep the dust and mold from overwhelming them until they do the work the house really needs.

The Hardy family is more closely knit than a lot of people could stand.

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Television
1:24 am
Thu January 3, 2013

'Downton Abbey' Cast: It's More Fun Downstairs

Hugh Bonneville (left) stars as Lord Grantham and Jim Carter as Mr. Carson, the formidable butler of Downton Abbey.
Joss Barratt Carnival Films

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 2:41 pm

With the third season of the sumptuously upholstered period drama Downton Abbey coming to PBS Masterpiece Classic on Jan. 6, Morning Edition's David Greene sat down with a half-dozen members of the cast to talk about what's in store.

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Europe
1:23 am
Thu January 3, 2013

Prime Minister Finds Soap Opera's Turkish Delights In Bad Taste

Eggs streak down a billboard advertising the popular Turkish soap opera The Magnificent Century. The show focuses on palace intrigue during the 16th-century rule of Suleiman the Magnificent. Some Islamists have protested the show's depiction of the sultan's harem.
Murad Sezer Reuters via Landov

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 4:27 am

Suleiman the Magnificent was the longest-reigning sultan of the Ottoman Empire, presiding for nearly a half-century at the peak of the empire's power in the 16th century.

During Suleiman's rule from 1520 to 1566, the Ottomans were a political, economic and military powerhouse. Suleiman's forces sacked Belgrade, annexed much of Hungary and advanced across large parts of the Middle East and North Africa.

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The Record
10:55 pm
Wed January 2, 2013

Patti Page, Who Dominated The '50s Pop Charts, Dies

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 4:27 am

Patti Page, whose comforting voice made hits of heartbreaking ballads ("Tennessee Waltz") and novelty songs ("How Much Is That Doggie in the Window?"), died Tuesday in Encinitas, Calif. She was 85 years old.

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The Two-Way
4:39 pm
Wed January 2, 2013

Clinton Discharged From Hospital After Blood Clot Treatment

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was discharged from a New York hospital today, after being treated for a blood clot. In December, Clinton and former President Bill Clinton attended a dinner for Kennedy honorees at the Department of State.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 4:40 am

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has been discharged from New York Presbyterian Hospital, where she was admitted Sunday for treatment of a blood clot that followed a concussion she suffered after fainting. Clinton has reportedly been taking blood thinning agents to help the clot dissolve.

"She's eager to get back to the office," according to a statement from Philippe Reines, deputy assistant Secretary of State, announcing Clinton's discharge.

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Toast Of The Nation
4:28 pm
Wed January 2, 2013

Clark Terry Quintet: Live In Chicago

Clark Terry.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 8:18 am

In 2013, the Jazz Showcase in Chicago, founded and still run by Joe Segal, celebrates 65 years of presenting jazz. The venue has hosted NPR recordings several times, including Toast of the Nation 1989. That's when trumpeter Clark Terry brought a quintet into the club, featuring his long-time friend Red Holloway on saxophone. Now 92, Terry — who played in the bands of both Count Basie and Duke Ellington — is universally recognized as a living legend. He and his band were in great spirits as 1989 turned to 1990.

Set List

  • "The Hymn" (Parker)
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Sports
4:26 pm
Wed January 2, 2013

Game, Set And Match: U.S. Tennis Tournaments Move Abroad

Pete Sampras returns a forehand against Russia's Marat Safin during an exhibition tennis match at the L.A. Tennis Open tournament in 2009. The tournament, which has been around for decades, is now relocating to Colombia as America's dominance in the sport declines and global appeal surges.
Danny Moloshok AP

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 5:16 am

Throughout most of its 86 years, Los Angeles' premier tennis tournament attracted the biggest names in the game. But over the years, stars stopped coming, and so did fans.

Now the Farmers Classic, which has been in L.A. since 1927, is headed to Bogota after it was bought by a Colombian sports marketing and entertainment company.

"There's a big hole in my heart. And believe me, this is something we didn't see coming, I'll be honest," says Bob Kramer, longtime tournament director of the Farmers Classic.

Read more
It's All Politics
4:23 pm
Wed January 2, 2013

Democratic Leader Pelosi to GOP Colleagues: 'Take Back Your Party'

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi speaks at a Dec. 19 news conference on Capitol Hill.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 7:00 am

House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi says she has urged Republican colleagues in Congress to "take back your party" from "anti-government ideologues" in their ranks.

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Toast Of The Nation
4:20 pm
Wed January 2, 2013

Dee Alexander's Funkin' With Electric Soul: Live In Chicago

Dee Alexander salutes Jimi Hendrix during her Funkin' With Electric Soul show.
Marc PoKempner

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 8:17 am

It started as a bongo beat — a nod to James Brown, just after his death in late 2006. Then came a few signature riffs. And an ecstatic response from the crowd. Before long, the Godfather of Soul was permanently embedded in the Evolution Ensemble's repertoire. For leader Dee Alexander, a powerful and versatile vocalist, it was all part of the same continuum — as was the music of Jimi Hendrix, whose music carried the same revolutionary weight.

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Toast Of The Nation
4:08 pm
Wed January 2, 2013

Gordon Goodwin's Big Phat Band: Live At Monterey Jazz Festival

Gordon Goodwin's Big Phat Band in concert at the Monterey Jazz Festival.
Tomas Ovalle

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 8:20 am

The composer/arranger Gordon Goodwin, leader of the Big Phat Band, says he had the opportunity to play the Monterey Jazz Festival some "three or two or four decades ago." In 2012, Goodwin, who plays keyboards and reeds, returned with his large jazz orchestra.

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Business
3:29 pm
Wed January 2, 2013

Avis And Zipcar Partnership Could Reshape Rental Business

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 5:51 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

I'm Robert Siegel. And here's a case of an old business colossus buying up a scrappy innovator. Avis, the traditional car rental company, is buying Zipcar for $500 million. Zipcar is the car-sharing company with the slogan: Wheels when you want them. NPR's Jim Zarroli reports the deal illustrates how car sharing is reshaping the rental business and drawing in a new demographic.

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All Tech Considered
3:28 pm
Wed January 2, 2013

Tech Idea List: 5 Nerds To Watch In 2013

Gina Bianchini speaks during a conference in Palm Desert, Calif., in 2010. She is founder of Mightybell, a company she hopes will unlock social media's power by helping small groups organize easily and quickly in the real world.
Francis Specker Landov

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 10:32 am

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