Books
12:30 pm
Sun November 17, 2013

WORDS ON A WIRE: Manuel Ramos

    Daniel talks with writer Manuel Ramos, whose latest work of crime fiction is "Desperado: A Mile High Noir."  Manuel talks about why the gentrification of the north part Denver plays such a strong role in the book and how it affects lead character, Gus Corral.  Manuel also tells us whether he's one of those writers who knows how their books are going to end before he ever writes one word. Manuel will also talk about his day job as an attorney working for Colorado Legal Services.

Today's Poem of the Week is by Cesar Abraham Vallejo.  Daniel reads "Dregs."

And in today's Poetic License, Patrick Michael Finn talks about his years-long struggle with rejection when it came to publishing his first collection of stories.

Aired Nov. 17, 2013.

The Two-Way
10:48 am
Sun November 17, 2013

Passenger Plane Crash In Russia Leaves 50 Dead

A commercial aircraft crashed during a landing in the central Russian city of Kazan, state media is reporting.

According to RIA Novosti and Russia Today, the Emergencies Ministry says they fear at least 50 people are dead. RT reports:

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The Salt
9:29 am
Sun November 17, 2013

See How Food Stamp Cuts Are Hitting Across The U.S.

Screen grab of a map that shows hard numbers about who's getting hit by food stamp cuts.
Stateline

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 2:20 pm

When you think of Oregon and food, you probably think organic chicken, kale chips and other signs of a strong local food movement. What probably doesn't come to mind? Food stamps.

And yet, 21 percent of Oregon's population – that's one out of every five residents – relies on food stamps to get by. And like many people across the country, these Oregon families who have come to rely on federal food assistance program for meals are learning to make do with less as of this month.

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The Two-Way
9:04 am
Sun November 17, 2013

Doris Lessing, Nobel Prize-Winning Author, Dies

British author Doris Lessing (L) shows her prize insignia of the 2007 Nobel Prize in Literature at the Wallace Collection in London in 2008.
Shaun Curry AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 8:43 am

Doris Lessing, the Nobel Prize-winning author, died Sunday morning according her publisher, Harper Collins.

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The Two-Way
7:52 am
Sun November 17, 2013

Boeing Announces Huge $95 Billion Haul At Dubai Airshow

A model of the Boeing 777-9X is displayed during the Dubai Airshow on Sunday, in the United Arab Emirates' capital Dubai.
Marwan Naamani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 6:55 am

The Chicago-based Boeing Co. announced a stunning haul at the Dubai Airshow on Sunday: Emirates, Qatar Airways, Eithad Airways, Lufthansa and Qatar bought 259 of its new 777 aircraft.

Based on list prices, the agreements are worth more than $95 billion.

Reuters reports:

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Sunday Puzzle
6:46 am
Sun November 17, 2013

More Fun Than A Dead Rose

NPR

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 9:24 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a made-up, two-word phrase in which the vowel in the first word is a short "e" and the vowel in the second word is a long "o." For example: A place to meditate would be a "zen zone."

Last week's challenge: There is a politician today, sometimes known by his or her full three-word name, whose initials are also the initials of a popular chain of restaurants. Who is the politician and what's the restaurant?

Answer: Hillary Rodham Clinton, Hard Rock Cafe

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The Two-Way
6:44 am
Sun November 17, 2013

In The Philippines, Signs Of Hope As Relief Efforts Pick Up

A girl crosses between collapsed roof tops in the damaged downtown area in Tacloban, Philippines, on Sunday.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 12:12 pm

A little over a week after a major typhoon devastated parts of the Philippines, there is some reason for hope today.

NPR's Russell Lewis, who has been trying to get to Tacloban all week, points us to the front page of today's The Philippine Star: "Aid Delivery To Leyte, Samar Speeding Up" the main headline reads.

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Around the Nation
6:04 am
Sun November 17, 2013

Bike Evangelist Wants To Put More Riders In The Low Seat

Andrew Duncan Carson makes recumbent bikes out of recycled parts in his garage. He says he'll never ride an upright bike again.
Jon Kalish NPR

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 10:24 am

After several knee operations, 66-year-old Marilyn Cowser of Greenfield, Wis., found herself no longer able to Rollerblade or ride her bike.

She was advised to try a recumbent bike, but when Cowser went to her local bike shop, she found they were selling for upwards of $1,500. Cowser wasn't willing to spend that kind of money, so she went to see a guy about a half-hour away who builds recumbents in his garage.

"When I got there, he had them all out," she says. "And I got on this one and took off. I mean, I just went."

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Politics
4:35 am
Sun November 17, 2013

Obama's Bad Week

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 9:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

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The Salt
4:35 am
Sun November 17, 2013

MSG, Seasoned For A Comeback

According to legend, Japanese chemist Kikunae Ikeda discovered the food additive monosodium glutamate in 1908 after contemplating the meaty flavor of seaweed soup.
Jung K Oh iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 2:20 pm

Umami, that savory fifth taste — in addition to bitter, sour, sweet and salty — has become a sought-after flavor in the culinary scene.

Not quite so beloved is the umami additive monosodium glutamate — MSG, as it's more popularly known. For decades it's been vilified, maligned and, some say, misunderstood.

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