Interviews
2:46 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

'Americanah' Author Explains 'Learning' To Be Black In The U.S.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's short fiction has appeared in The New Yorker and Granta. She is also the author of the novels Purple Hibiscus and Half of A Yellow Sun.
Little, Brown and Co.

This interview was originally broadcast on June 27, 2013.

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Remembrances
2:46 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Fresh Air Remembers Surgeon And 'How We Die' Author Sherwin Nuland

Transcript

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. Because he was a doctor, Sherwin Nuland witnessed many deaths, including those in his own family. Dr. Nuland - who was a surgeon - was the author of "How We Die," an influential book about dying, which won a National Book Award. It was published in 1994. Twenty years after his book was published, Dr. Nuland himself died on Monday at his home in Connecticut from prostate cancer. He was 83.

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Movie Reviews
2:44 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

'Particle Fever': Thrills, Chills And High Subatomic Drama

Yes, that is a man standing there, in the middle of this one small fraction of one experimental node of the Large Hadron Collider.
CERN

All you really need to know about Particle Fever is that it includes footage of physicists rapping. About physics. Wearing giant Einstein masks.

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Song Travels
2:07 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Tierney Sutton On 'Song Travels'

Tierney Sutton.
Courtesy of the artist

Jazz vocalist Tierney Sutton has headlined national venues, from Carnegie Hall to the Hollywood Bowl, and has earned five Grammy nominations. With her latest project, After Blue, Sutton takes on the genius of singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell.

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News
2:03 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Border Patrol Revises Its Rulebook For Use Of Deadly Force

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 5:29 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The chief of the U.S. Border Patrol wants agents to limit their use of deadly force. The Border Patrol says agents have killed 10 people since 2010, while the ACLU says that number is 27. NPR's Ted Robbins reports on a directive issued today that outlines new guidance for the use of force against rock throwers and vehicles.

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NPR News Investigations
2:03 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

U.S. Grave Science Marked By Risk Aversion And Bureaucracy

Elyse Butler for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 9:02 am

In part two of a joint investigation by NPR and ProPublica, we look at the agency charged with bringing home and identifying the 83,000 American war dead. It's stymied by an extreme aversion to risk. See the

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Around the Nation
2:03 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Meet The Spellers Who Broke The Bee

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 5:29 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Here's a twist: A spelling bee that ends in a tie. Well, that's just what happened in Kansas City two weeks ago, but only one person can win. So the two spellers will battle it out once more tomorrow morning. Maria Carter of member station KCUR has the story.

JORDAN HOFFMAN: Spell madeleine.

SOPHIA HOFFMAN: Madeleine. Definition, please?

MARIA CARTER, BYLINE: That's 11-year-old Sophia Hoffman, a wisp of a girl with blonde hair. She's studying today with her older sister, Jordan.

HOFFMAN: It's a French pastry.

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Europe
2:03 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Behind Ukraine's Political Strife: One Big Utility Bill

Cossacks stand guard at the entrance to the Crimean Parliament building on Friday in Simferopol, Ukraine. Russian Cossacks, some heavily armed, have taken up guard duties at road checkpoints, border crossings and other key facilities that were previously guarded by local, pro-Russian militants across Crimea in recent days.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 5:29 pm

One way to understand the situation between Ukraine and Russia right now: Look at the gas bill of an ordinary Ukrainian.

Valentina Olachenka, for example, pays $19 a month for gas to heat her house and run her stove. The average American who uses natural gas, by contrast, spends more than $100 a month.

Gas is cheap for Ukrainians because the government is paying most of the bill — 87 cents of every dollar, according to the IMF.

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Europe
2:03 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

In Kharkiv, A Snapshot Of Ukraine's Tumult And Hope

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 5:29 pm

In Ukraine's second largest city, Kharkiv, both pro-Europe and pro-Russian groups are planning more rallies this weekend. Some residents fear civil war; others believe compromise is still possible.

Europe
2:03 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Moscow's Ukraine Looks Different From The One Seen By The West

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 5:29 pm

Russian politicians are all voicing the same narrative: Ukraine's legitimate government was overthrown by neo-Nazis, while the armed men in Crimea are not Russian troops but local self-defense groups.

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