The Two-Way
3:38 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

German Fears About U.S. Spying Could Hurt Trade Deal

A carnival truck caricatures President Obama and the NSA spying scandal during a parade through Frankfurt, Germany, last month.
Frank Rumpenhorst EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 8:52 am

Most Americans and Germans agree: More trade between the United States and the European Union would be a good idea.

But when you get down to details of a possible trade pact, suspicions pop up, according to a new poll conducted by the Pew Research Center in association with Germany's Bertelsmann Foundation.

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Movie Reviews
3:38 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

On 'Draft Day,' A Coach Faces His Own Big Game

Denis Leary plays a wound-up coach and Kevin Costner plays a general manager in Draft Day, a comedy set on the NFL's most stressful day of the year.
Dale Robinette Courtesy of Summit Entertainment

Draft Day may be a sports movie, but football isn't the sport. Games are played, but they're not on a field. This is a chess match, a poker game and a battle of wills, and in the place of a team full of plucky underdogs trying to come up with an unlikely win in the zero hour, there's a downtrodden NFL general manager trying to make a series of business deals to save his job and his team's revenue stream.

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Monkey See
3:33 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Stephen Colbert: The End Of One Joke, The Start Of Many More

Stephen Colbert has made a name for himself, literally, as the host of his own show. Now, he will succeed David Letterman as the host of The Late Show.
Scott Gries Picturegroup

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 5:37 am

CBS just ended the longest-running joke in TV history by naming Stephen Colbert to succeed retiring late-night host David Letterman

That's because Colbert, who has won all kinds of acclaim playing fictional right-wing cable TV news host "Stephen Colbert" on The Colbert Report, will now play a new character when he takes over Letterman's Late Show:

Himself.

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All Tech Considered
3:32 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

One-Day Sale: Google Glass Will Be Available For A Cool $1,500

Google co-founder Sergey Brin wears Google Glass in February 2013.
Jeff Chiu AP

Google Glass, the computer and camera you wear on your face, can be yours starting next Tuesday. Google has been rolling out Glass to a select group of "Explorers" since early 2013, but soon, anyone in the U.S. with $1,500 plus tax can get a headset at this link.

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All Songs Considered
3:25 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

The Good Listener: How Do I Appear Knowledgeable Without Acting Like A Jerk?

Jack Black in a scene from the 2003 film School Of Rock
Andrew Schwartz PARAMOUNT

We get a lot of mail at NPR Music, and amid the fliers for yard-cleaning services that know a big job when they see one are a slew of smart questions about how music fits into our lives — and, this week, thoughts on ways to drop musical knowledge without seeming obnoxious.

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Law
3:21 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

For Albuquerque PD, A Searing Rebuke From Justice Department

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 6:12 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Book Reviews
3:21 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

After A Disaster In 'Family Life,' Relief Never Comes

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 6:12 pm

Some things in life are just too painful to accept, and the same is true in novels. Family Life is the story of the Mishras, who immigrate to the U.S. in the late 1970s from India. Their departure is such a big deal that townspeople gather around just to have a look at their airplane tickets. Expectations of the life that awaits them start to build. "Americans clean themselves with paper, not water," says a classmate of the younger Mishra brother, Ajay, who narrates the novel. "In America, they say 'yeah' not yes," the boy goes on. To which Ajay replies, "That's nothing.

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The Two-Way
3:06 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

What's A Breath Of Fresh Air Worth? In China, About $860

Beijing artist Liang Kegang poses in a Beijing art gallery earlier this week with the jar of fresh air he collected in Provence, France.
Didi Tang AP

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 10:37 am

It's a classic example of supply and demand: How much would you pay for a bottle of fresh air in one of the world's most polluted cities?

When Beijing artist Liang Kegang returned home from a vacation in France, he brought with him a jar of clean air he had collected from Provence. At auction in a group of about 100 fellow artists and collectors, the jar of air fetched the equivalent of $860, according to The Associated Press.

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It's All Politics
2:48 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Luci Baines Johnson: Vietnam War 'Lanced' LBJ's Gut Every Night

Luci Baines Johnson greets residents as she accompanies her mother, Lady Bird Johnson, to Savannah, Ga., on Oct. 8, 1964.
AP

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 9:27 am

The 50th anniversary of President Johnson's signing of the 1964 Civil Rights Act is being celebrated this week at the LBJ Presidential Library in Austin, Texas.

NPR's Don Gonyea spoke Wednesday to Luci Baines Johnson, the 66-year-old younger daughter of the 36th president, about some of the human dimensions of the presidency.

Here are some highlights from their discussion:

On the toll the presidency took on her father

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Code Switch
2:47 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

How The Son Of A Confederate Soldier Became A Civil Rights Hero

Sculptor Richard Weaver created this life-sized sculpture of federal judge J. Waties Waring.
Rick Rhodes Courtesy of the J Waties Waring Statue Committee

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 1:25 pm

U.S. District Judge J. Waties Waring was the son of a Confederate soldier but later became a hero of the civil rights movement — though he was vilified for his views. On Friday — more than 60 years after Waring was one of the first in the Deep South to declare that forced segregation was unconstitutional — Charleston, S.C., will honor him with a life-sized statue.

Waring was first appointed to the bench in 1942. Nine years later, in a landmark school segregation case Briggs v. Elliott, Waring denounced segregation as an "evil that must be eradicated."

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