Sports
1:32 am
Mon January 20, 2014

U.S. Olympic Skier Finds Team Spirit, Minus The Team

Kris Freeman, skiiing here for the U.S. team in 2011, during the Winter Games NZ, was cut from the U.S. Ski team before the upcoming Sochi Olympic Games. Freeman has had to train without their support and still hopes to qualify to compete in Russia.
Hannah Johnston Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 20, 2014 6:57 pm

The U.S. Olympic team is taking shape in the run-up to next month's Winter Games in Russia. This week, the Olympic cross-country ski team names the athletes who'll be going to Sochi, and veteran Kris Freeman is vying for another spot.

The 33-year-old Freeman already has been to three Olympic Games, and he's considered the country's best long distance racer over the past decade.

All that despite the fact that he has diabetes.

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Shots - Health News
1:28 am
Mon January 20, 2014

In These Gyms, Nobody Cares How You Look In Yoga Pants

Kendall Schrantz, center, stretches after a class at Downsize Fitness in Fort Worth.
Lauren Silverman for NPR

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 6:46 am

If you want to lift weights or use the treadmill at Downsize Fitness, you have to be at least 50 pounds overweight.

Kendall Schrantz is a fan – and a member.

The 24-year-old has struggled with her weight since she was in the second grade. The looks she got at other gyms made her uncomfortable.

But now she drives more than an hour to Downsize Fitness in Fort Worth three times a week, just to exercise.

"It's worth every single penny I paid for gas," she said. "It's worth the time I spend on the road, the miles."

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Around the Nation
1:27 am
Mon January 20, 2014

Police, Banks Help Undocumented Workers Shake 'Walking ATM' Label

Prince George's County, Md., Police Officer Juan Damian and Dora Escobar outside one of her popular check cashing businesses.
Laura Sullivan NPR

Originally published on Mon January 20, 2014 6:04 am

On a recent Friday evening in Langley Park, Md., police officer Juan Damian drives his patrol car past fast food restaurants, discount stores and Hispanic groceries.

Damian estimates that at least two-thirds of the people here are undocumented, and that has made it a magnet for robberies over the years. Gangs know undocumented day workers are especially lucrative targets, he says. Their pockets are often stuffed with a day's or even a week's worth of wages. The street term for these men: "walking ATMs."

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Edward Schumacher-Matos is the ombudsman for NPR. His column can be found on NPR.org here.

Having spent more than three decades as a reporter and editor in the United States and abroad for some of the nation's most prestigious news outlets, and having founded his own newspapers, Schumacher-Matos has a deep understanding of the essential role that journalists play in upholding a vital democracy. He also intimately understands the demands that reporters and editors face every day.

NPR Ombudsman
8:01 pm
Sun January 19, 2014

Fairness In Covering Israel And The Palestinians: The End Of An Accounting

Palestinians protest in the center of the West Bank city of Ramallah against the continuation of negotiations with Israel, and demand that Palestinian president Mahmud Abbas not meet with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry on Jan. 15, 2014.
Abbas Momani AFP/Getty Images

A quarterly review over the past 11 years of NPR's coverage of Israel and the Palestinians—a self-assessment that may be unique in the annals of American journalism—comes to an end with the attached last report that finds lack of completeness but strong factual accuracy and no systematic bias.

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Science
7:30 pm
Sun January 19, 2014

SCIENCE STUDIO: Voyager Propulsion System

In this 1963 photograph, Ben Abeles demonstrates how the silicon-germanium alloys he and George Cody developed could convert heat directly into electricity, which in this case was used to power a small fan.
Credit Alexander Magoun, David Sarnoff Research Center

    Keith & Russ talk with physicists George Cody and Benjamin Abeles, who developed the vehicle propulsion system for the Voyager spacecraft.  Their silicon-germanium thermoelectric power generator, developed in the 1960s, is still being used by interplanetary spacecraft today.  

Aired Jan. 19, 2014.

The Two-Way
4:48 pm
Sun January 19, 2014

United Nations Invites Iran To First Day Of Syrian Peace Negotiations

Originally published on Sun January 19, 2014 6:32 pm

Update at 8:27 p.m. EST State From U.S. Department of State:

State Department spokesman Jen Psaki said in a statement Sunday that Iran's invitation must be rescinded unless Iran makes "explicit and public support for the full implementation of the Geneva communique including the establishment of a transitional governing body by mutual consent with full executive authorities."

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Space
4:42 pm
Sun January 19, 2014

Mars Or Bust: Putting Humans On The Red Planet

Tracks from NASA's Opportunity rover disappear toward the horizon on the Meridiani Plains of Mars. The rover has been on the planet since 2004.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell University

"I don't know why you're on Mars, but whatever the reason for going to Mars is, I'm glad you're there and I wish I was with you."

That was a part of astrophysicist Carl Sagan's message, recorded a few months before he died in 1996, to the future human inhabitants of Mars.

Some of the earliest science fiction imagined voyages to the Red Planet. We now have the space-faring technology, and getting humans to Mars actually seems within reach. It would certainly involve massive resources and a lot of danger, but some believe the rewards would be massive.

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Television
3:42 pm
Sun January 19, 2014

Before 'Jersey Shore' Owned Sleaze, There Was Bobby Bottleservice

Bobby Bottleservice is a recurring character on Nick Kroll's Kroll Show.
Ron Batzdorff Comedy Central

Originally published on Sun January 19, 2014 4:42 pm

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Around the Nation
3:19 pm
Sun January 19, 2014

Clear, Sharp And Properly Exposed: How A Photo Made A Career

Bill O'Leary's photo of Marion Barry getting escorted by an FBI agent made the front page of the Jan. 19, 1990, issue of The Washington Post.
Bill O'Leary The Washington Post

Originally published on Mon February 17, 2014 3:29 pm

As part of a new series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

On Jan. 18, 1990, Washington, D.C., Mayor Marion Barry was arrested for possession and use of crack cocaine in a hotel room during an FBI sting.

Meanwhile, at The Washington Post, intern Bill O'Leary was waiting for his first real assignment.

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