KTEP Local
8:00 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

ACT RADIO: Questions People Ask Vegans

  Greg, Liz, and Tom talk with Sherry Colb, Charles Evans Hughes Scholar and Professor of Law at Cornell University.  Sherry is the author of "Mind if I Order the Cheeseburger: And Other Questions People Ask Vegans."  Sherry talks about some of those questions, including "what about plants?"  Why are vegans not as sensitive to the needs of plants as the are of animals?  Another question, "what about eating for pleasure?" is one that non-vegans use to justify their consumption of meat and cheese. Part 1 of a 2-part interview.  http://mindifiorderthecheeseburger.com/

Aired April 27, 2014.

Science
7:30 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

SCIENCE STUDIO: Batteries

Perla Balbuena
Credit Texas A&M

  Keith & Russ talk with Perla Balbuena, principal researcher of the Balbuena Research Group in the Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering at Texas A&M University.  She is involved in the computer modeling of batteries, and is exploring ways to improve electrolytes in batteries.  Improving the electrolyte improves the whole chemistry of a battery.

Aired April 27, 2014.

Education
4:36 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

Learning With Disabilities: One Effort To Shake Up The Classroom

Samuel Habib, seen here at 3 years old, sits in his supportive corner chair in class. Samuel, who has cerebral palsy, is now 14 and is headed to high school. Dan Habib, Samuel's father, is an advocate for inclusion and made a film about his son called Including Samuel.
Dan Habib/includingsamuel.com

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 7:54 am

This is what an inclusive classroom looks like: Children with disabilities sit next to ones who've been deemed "gifted and talented." The mixing is done carefully, and quietly. Students don't necessarily know who's working at what level.

Despite a court ruling 25 years ago that gave children with disabilities equal access to general education activities, change has been slow.

Today, about 17 percent of students with any disability spend all or most of their days segregated. Children with severe disabilities can still expect that separation.

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Music Interviews
3:21 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

Reliving 'Dylan's Gospel': Bob's Songs Transformed

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 4:23 pm

In 1969, music producer Lou Adler assembled LA's top background singers for a gospel reading of Bob Dylan songs. NPR's Eric Westervelt speaks with Adler and Merry Clayton about the album's re-release.

Science
3:21 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

Astronaut Twins To Separate For The Sake Of Space Travel

Mark Kelly (left) will stay on Earth while his brother, Scott Kelly, spends a year on the International Space Station. NASA will test how the environments affect them differently.
NBC NewsWire NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 4:23 pm

This month, NASA revealed new details of the plan to send humans to Mars by 2030. It's an elaborate and expensive mission, involving a giant deep-space rocket, and roping an asteroid into the moon's orbit to use as a stepping stone to Mars.

But there are still some serious questions about a manned expedition to Mars. Namely, is it safe? That's where astronauts Scott and Mark Kelly come in. The Kelly brothers are identical twins, and the only siblings ever to both fly in space.

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Africa
3:21 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

'Have Mercy On Our Little Ones': Kidnapping Agonizes Nigerians

Families of kidnapped schoolgirls attend a meeting with the local government in the remote town of Chibok, Nigeria.
Afolabi Sotunde Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 4:23 pm

There is a grim mood of outrage in Nigeria. In the faraway, northeastern town of Chibok, more than 200 girls were kidnapped from their boarding school dorms in the dead of night nearly two weeks ago.

Chibok is a mixed Christian and Muslim community in predominately Muslim northern Nigeria. The attackers are suspected Islamist extremists. Under pressure, the Nigerian government is vowing to rescue the missing students, but the military is being blamed for failing to free the teens and crush an increasingly deadly insurgency.

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Middle East
3:21 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

Aleppo Now A De Facto 'Partition City' In Syria

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 4:23 pm

Sam Dagher of the Wall Street Journal, reporting from the front lines of the war in Syria, talks to NPR's Eric Westervelt about his recent trip to Aleppo. Once a showcase of the country's diversity and culture, today it represents the ghastly, grinding stalemate of Syria's civil war.

Middle East
3:21 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

Skepticism Of Effort To Remove Syria's Weapons Remains Strong

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 4:23 pm

Nearly 90 percent of Syria's chemical weapons have been removed from the country for destruction. At the same time, there are unconfirmed reports of chlorine bomb attacks by the Syrian government. NPR's Eric Westervelt talks to chemical weapons expert Amy Smithson.

Arts & Life
3:21 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

Fair Or Not, Getting Kids To Eat Their Vegetables

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 4:23 pm

Pediatric nutritionist Dr. Deb Kennedy, author of The Picky Eating Solution, talks with NPR's Eric Westervelt about catering to kids who put up fights at the dinner table.

The Two-Way
2:46 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

49ers Fan Sues NFL For $50 Million Over Seattle Playoff Tickets

A 49ers fan displays her hopes for next season at a Seahawks game. If a San Francisco fan has his way, the sign could also refer to playoff tickets, which were limited to markets with strong Seattle support this year.
Kevin C. Cox Getty Images

Saying the Seattle Seahawks kept San Francisco 49ers fans from being able to pull for their team in January's NFC title game, a 49ers fan is suing the NFL, claiming the practice of limiting ticket sales to pro-Seahawks markets amounts to "economic discrimination." He is seeking $50 million in damages.

As hosts of the playoff game, the Seahawks limited credit-card sales of tickets to accounts with billing addresses in a list of nearby states. California wasn't on that list, which included parts of Canada and Hawaii. As a resident of Nevada, John E. Williams III was shut out.

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