Shots - Health News
1:25 am
Mon May 12, 2014

Medicare Won't Always Pay For Boomers' Pricey Hepatitis C Drugs

New hepatitis C drugs can cost as much as $1,000 per pill.
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 10:02 am

Walter Bianco has had hepatitis C for decades. He's known about it for 20 years. And now he's reaching the end of the road.

"The liver is at the stage next to becoming cirrhotic," the 65-year-old Arizona man says.

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Shots - Health News
1:24 am
Mon May 12, 2014

That Prescription Might Not Have Been Tested For Your Ailment

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:00 pm

It's actually quite common for doctors to write "off label" prescriptions, including using cancer drugs to treat migraine headaches or blood pressure medication for heart failure.

One study found that 1 in 5 prescriptions written in doctor's offices has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat the condition it is being used for. And while some off-label drugs are used with no problems, others may not work or may increase a patient's risk of complications.

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Fine Art
1:23 am
Mon May 12, 2014

One Collector's Plan To Save Realistic Art Was Anything But Abstract

Two pensive women share a mysterious, intense moment in Raphael Soyer's 1980 Annunciation.
Smithsonian American Art Museum

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 12:56 pm

Plenty of collectors want to donate artworks to museums, but the museums don't always welcome them with open arms. "We say 'no thanks' 19 times out of 20," says Betsy Broun, director at the American Art Museum. Sometimes the works aren't museum-quality, other times they don't fit with the museums' philosophy.

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Education
11:17 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Why Aren't Teens Reading Like They Used To?

British Library of Political and Economic Science Flickr

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 8:21 am

Harry Potter and The Hunger Games haven't been big hits for nothing. Lots of teens and adolescents still read quite a lot.

But a roundup of studies, put together by the nonprofit Common Sense Media, shows a clear decline over time. Nearly half of 17-year-olds say they read for pleasure no more than one or two times a year — if that.

That's way down from a decade ago.

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The Two-Way
10:03 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Glenn Greenwald: NSA Believes It Should Be Able To Monitor All Communication

Glenn Greenwald in April, arriving in the U.S. for the first time since documents were disclosed to him by former intelligence analyst Edward Snowden.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 9:12 am

Glenn Greenwald, the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who helped to break stories about mass surveillance in the United States, is making more revelations in a new book coming out Tuesday.

In an interview with NPR's Morning Edition, Greenwald says one of the more "shocking" things he's found is that the National Security Agency physically intercepted shipments of computer hardware, like routers, switches and servers, to outfit them with surveillance equipment.

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KTEP Local
8:00 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

ACT RADIO: Questions People Ask Vegans (part 2)

  Greg, Tom, and Liz continue their conversation with Sherry Colb, professor of law at Cornell University and author of "Mind If I Order the Cheeseburger: And Other Questions People Ask Vegans."  Sherry answers a few of those questions, including "If animals can eat other animals, why can't I?"..."Didn't God make man superior to the animals?"...and "What will happen to all the cows if factory farming ends? Won't they go extinct?"  Part 2 of a 2-part interview.  http://www.mindifiorderthecheeseburger.com/

Aired May 11, 2014.

Science
7:30 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

SCIENCE STUDIO: Genetics of Addiction

Tamara Phillips
Credit ohsu.edu

  Keith talks with Tamara Phillips, Professor & Vice-Chair, Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University.  She talks about her interest in the genetic risk for addiction - what genetic factors make some people more prone to addiction?  Her research on mouse models involves trying to isolate a receptor in the brain that sensitizes an individual to alcohol.  http://www.ohsu.edu/xd/education/schools/school-of-medicine/academic-programs/graduate-studies/faculty/grad-studies-faculty.cfm?facultyid=285

Aired May 11, 2014.

Around the Nation
5:10 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Veterans' Success At Home: More Than Just Landing Any Job

Veterans leave the service with high-level skills, like combat medicine, but it's often not easy to turn those skills into credentials for a civilian job.
Brennan Linsley AP

The federal government has spent billions helping veterans get the training and education they need to re-enter the civilian workforce.

Despite the effort, the unemployment rate for vets remains higher than the national average. Aside from dealing with the psychological transition, veterans also have to navigate how to transfer their military skills into civilian ones.

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Jay Field is a reporter for MPBN Radio based in the network’s Bangor bureau. In his reporting for the network’s flagship program, Maine Things Considered, Field enjoys exploring how real people’s lives are impacted by the unique policy challenges, economic, education, natural resource and otherwise, that come with daily life in a rural state.

World
3:11 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

'Nowhere To Go,' Ugandan LGBT Activist Applies For Asylum In U.S.

At a news conference in Boston on May 6, Ugandan LGBT activist John Abdallah Wambere says he is seeking asylum in the U.S.
Josh Reynolds AP

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 4:31 pm

Citing an environment of fear, persecution and anti-gay violence in his home country of Uganda, John Abdallah Wambere has applied for asylum in the United States.

Wambere, 41, came to prominence for his work with Spectrum Uganda Initiatives, an organization that advocates for LGBT rights and provides health and education services.

He announced his decision to seek asylum at a news conference on May 6 in Boston. Wambere is currently living in Cambridge, Mass.

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