Business
3:01 am
Mon February 3, 2014

United Airlines To Close Cleveland Hub

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 5:43 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a Cleveland hub closure.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: United Airlines announced plans over the weekend to drop Cleveland Hopkins International Airport as one of its main hubs for connecting flights. Company officials say the hub has not turned a profit in more than a decade and loses tens of millions of dollars annually. How is that possible? It's one of the few airports I can remember where you can get a boilermaker.

Business
3:01 am
Mon February 3, 2014

Jury To Get Insider Trading Case Of Matthew Martoma

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 5:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And a jury in New York is expected to begin deciding the fate of Matthew Martoma this week. A former portfolio manager at the hedge fund company SAC Capital Advisors, Martoma is accused of insider trading. Officials say he sold shares of two pharmaceutical companies after obtaining inside information about drugs being developed.

NPR's Jim Zarroli has more.

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Business
3:01 am
Mon February 3, 2014

J.C. Penney's Typo-Riddled Tweets Attract 'Free Media'

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 5:43 am

Free media is when you get exposure that's better than advertising. The company sent out some tweets during the Super Bowl but there were a lot of typos. The mistakes gained national attention. The company said it had been tweeting while wearing mittens — products Penney was promoting.

Politics
3:01 am
Mon February 3, 2014

Voters In New Orleans Give Mayor Mitch Landrieu 2nd Term

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 5:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Over the weekend New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu celebrated a big reelection victory. In triumph, the mayor reflected on the city's recovery from Hurricane Katrina back in 2005.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

MAYOR MITCH LANDRIEU: We got up. We dusted ourselves off. We took that first step. And then we took another. We pressed on and we as a people have come back strong.

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Remembrances
3:01 am
Mon February 3, 2014

Philip Seymour Hoffman On His Portrayal Of Willy Loman

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 5:43 am

Many famous actors have played the role of Willy Loman in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman. Philip Seymour Hoffman became the fifth actor to play the harried, 63-year-old Loman on Broadway. (Steve Inskeep's conversation with Philip Seymour Hoffman initially aired on April 12, 2012 on Morning Edition).

Theater
1:30 am
Mon February 3, 2014

'After Midnight,' And The Cotton Club Is Swinging Again

Fantasia Barrino, the American Idol winner who went on to play the lead role in Broadway's The Color Purple, was among the rotating roster of guest stars in After Midnight, a Broadway revue celebrating Harlem's legendary Cotton Club and the stars who performed there.
Matthew Murphy

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 5:43 am

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Shots - Health News
1:28 am
Mon February 3, 2014

What's Good For Baby Camels Could Be Good For Human Skin

Camels in Jordan supply the milk for a Missouri startup's skin-care line. The company is studying the milk's anti-inflammatory properties.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 2:17 pm

In parts of the Middle East, people drink camel's milk for its nutritional value. It boasts more vitamin C and iron than cow's milk, and it's lower in fat. But in the American Midwest, some people are rubbing camel's milk on their skin — in the form of a skin-care line from Jordan.

Penelope Shihab is the founder of a biotech company in Jordan — and the woman behind the Missouri startup that's working on the skin-care products.

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Shots - Health News
1:27 am
Mon February 3, 2014

Most Teens Aren't Active Enough, And It's Not Always Their Fault

The CDC would be happy with these guys, who were playing in Birmingham, Ala., in July 2013. Teenage boys say basketball is their favorite activity.
Mark Almond AL.COM /Landov

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 5:43 am

Sure, you think, my kid's on a football team. That takes care of his exercise needs, right? Probably not.

"There are these bursts of activity," says Jim Sallis, a professor of family and preventive medicine at the University of California, San Diego. "But if you think about it, one hour of playing football out on the field means that the vast majority of that time is spent standing around waiting for the next play."

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Shots - Health News
1:26 am
Mon February 3, 2014

Young Athletes Risk Back Injury By Playing Too Much

A West Coast team player kicks the ball during a match at the Adidas Challenges America's Youth Soccer Stars tournament in Venice, Calif.
Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 4, 2014 7:27 am

Jack Everett sat on his living room couch wearing a back brace, eyes glued to a massive TV set playing his favorite video game, NHL 2013.

"I'm the Boston Bruins," the 10-year-old said as he deftly worked the video controls. "The guy that just shot was Milan Lucic. He's a really good guy on our team."

Whether at home or during recess at his elementary school in suburban Los Angeles, Jack's young life now is about sitting still.

"Well, I can eat lunch with friends, and I play cards," Jack says. But his classmates are out running and jumping outside.

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The Edge
1:25 am
Mon February 3, 2014

The Games Are A Great Party, But Not A Great Investment

Graffiti covers a vent adjacent to the Athens Olympic Stadium in this photo from Feb. 18, 2012. Expenditures on the 2004 Athens Summer Games contributed to the country's debt load, which sparked the current economic crisis.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 5:02 pm

NPR correspondents Ari Shapiro, in London, and Joanna Kakissis, in Athens, teamed up for this joint look at Olympics economics.

The Winter Olympics in Sochi are just a few days away. Russia has spent $50 billion on everything from construction to security, making these the most expensive games in history.

Countries often justify the Olympic-sized price tag by saying the investment pays off in increased business and tourism.

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