Middle East
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Despite Incredible Loss, Iraqi Refugee Thankful For Her Life

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 5:46 am

Host Scott Simon talks with a 29-year-old Iraqi refugee who now lives in the U.S. She worked for the U.S. Army in Baghdad but had to flee Iraq because it was too dangerous to stay.

Iraq
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Letters To My Dead Father

Guffran, 16, sits on the floor of her home, holding a letter she wrote to her father. A Shiite Muslim, Guffran's father was gunned down on the streets of Baghdad in 2006.
Kelly McEvers NPR

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 5:46 am

Ten years after the U.S. invaded Iraq, NPR is taking a look back, revisiting people and places first encountered during the war. In 2006, NPR aired a story about a 9-year-old girl who loved her father so much, she wrote him letters to take to work with him. Even after he died, in a carjacking that appeared to have a sectarian motive, she still wrote to him.

Read more
Music News
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Arhoolie Records: 50 Years Of Digging For Down-Home Music

Strachwitz and Ry Cooder backstage at Arhoolie's 50th anniversary celebration.
Mike Melnyk Arhoolie Records

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 11:41 am

Read more
Around the Nation
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Dyeing Chicago River Green Has History Of Trial And Error

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 5:46 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Chicago's St. Patrick's Day parade takes place today which means the Chicago River will be green, I mean, even greener than usual. The river is colored green, of course, every year on this day. How did that get started? We're joined now by the dean of Chicago's city council, Alderman Edward Burke of the 14th Ward, who's has been on the council for more than 40 years. Alderman, thanks so much for being with us.

ALDERMAN EDWARD BURKE: Thanks for inviting me and Happy St. Patrick's Day.

Read more
The Salt
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Wine Revolution: As Drinkers And Growers, U.S. Declares Independence

The vineyard at Round Pond Estate in Rutherford, Calif. Napa Valley is just one of wine-growing regions across the country.
Eric Risberg AP

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 10:46 am

A curious shift has happened in global wine-drinking trends: Americans have overtaken the French and Italians, Europe's traditional lovers of the fruits of the vine, as the world's top wine market.

And it's not just wine drinking that's taken off stateside: U.S. wine production is also on the rise.

Read more
It's All Politics
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Ted Cruz: From Texas Underdog To Republican Up-And-Comer

Texas Republican Ted Cruz, then senator-elect, speaks to reporters before a freshman senators luncheon on Nov. 13.
Harry Hamburg AP

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 5:48 am

The keynote speaker at Saturday night's closing session of the Conservative Political Action Conference is a 42-year-old Texan who's been a U.S. senator since January.

In that short time, Tea Party Republican Ted Cruz has already made a mark — and in doing so, he's simply ignored a tradition of new senators being seen, not heard. Cruz's sharp elbows have some colleagues wincing and others hoping he'll run for president.

Read more
Politics
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Talk Of Zombies Aside, Gun Bills Face Political Reality

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy holds a hearing on gun control on March 7. The committee has since passed two bills on guns that are headed to the full Senate.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 11:52 am

Two more gun control bills are heading to the Senate floor after narrowly winning approval from the Senate Judiciary Committee this week.

Read more
Politics
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

CPAC Showcases Mix Of Conservative Visions

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 5:46 am

The annual Conservative Political Action Conference wraps Saturday. NPR's Don Gonyea gives the highlights from the annual gathering of conservatives.

Author Interviews
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

A Little Blue Alien Helped Hemon Bear Witness To His 'Lives'

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 5:46 am

Since his 2000 literary debut, Aleksandar Hemon has been hailed as "a maestro, a conjurer, a channeler of universes." In books including The Question of Bruno and Love and Obstacles, he's written about archdukes and exiles; a Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina of memories; and a Chicago that's in your face.

Read more
Author Interviews
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Lack Of Conscience Gets A Comeuppance In 'The Accursed'

Courtesy Ecco

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 5:46 am

Something suspicious is going on in Princeton, N.J., in the otherwise sleepy year of 1905. Children turn into stone. Spouses disappear into horse-drawn carriages. Snakes squirm up and down walls. Is it some kind of curse? What could the good people of Princeton have possibly done to bring a curse on themselves?

Read more

Pages