Books
11:59 am
Sun September 1, 2013

WORDS ON A WIRE: Alberto Rios

In a rebroadcast from March 10, 2013, Ben & Daniel talk with Alberto Rios, author of the poetry collection "The Dangerous Shirt."  Rios, a professor of English at Arizona State University, talks about how teaching feeds into his work.  He also talks about how the landscape of Arizona influences his poetry.  Rios, whose mother was English, reveals how he learned to see the world through her eyes as an outsider in predominately Hispanic surroundings.

For this week's Poem of the Week, Alberto Rios reads "My Dog, That Stranger" from his latest collection, "The Dangerous Shirt."

http://www.public.asu.edu/~aarios/

Aired September 1, 2013.

The Two-Way
11:45 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Another Chinese Official Caught Up In Corruption Probe

Jiang Jiemin, left, is the latest Chinese official to come under scrutiny for possible corruption.
Kin Cheung Associated Press

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 5:52 pm

Another high-level corruption probe has begun in China even as the trial of former regional Chinese Communist Party boss Bo Xilai was apparently still underway.

Jiang Jiemin, the head of the commission that oversees state-owned companies, is suspected of a "serious violation of discipline" related to his top job at the China National Petroleum Corporation.

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The Two-Way
9:27 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Radioactive Water Leak At Fukushima Worse Than First Thought

This photo taken Aug. 6 shows local government officials and nuclear experts at Fukushima after contaminated water was discovered.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 8:48 am

Radiation surrounding Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant has increased 18-fold following a report last month that radioactive water had leaked into the ground around the plant, which was badly damaged in a 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

Tokyo Electric Power Co., which owns the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, reports that radiation around the site is at 1,800 millisieverts per hour, a level that Reuters says is "enough to kill an exposed person in four hours."

Previously, the utility, also known as Tepco, said the leaking water was at around 100 millisieverts per hour.

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The Two-Way
7:29 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Kerry: Tests Indicate Sarin Used In Syria

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry delivers a statement about the use of chemical weapons in Syria at the Department of State last week.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 2:46 pm

Secretary of State John Kerry says that tests have shown evidence of Syria's use of the chemical agent sarin in an attack on the opposition last month that the White House has blamed on the regime of President Bashar al-Assad.

"I can share with you today that blood and hair samples that have come to us through an appropriate chain of custody from East Damascus, from first responders, it has tested positive for signatures of sarin," Kerry told CNN on Sunday.

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Sports
7:14 am
Sun September 1, 2013

College Football Season Starts

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 9:23 am

Alabama starts the year ranked No. 1, but after the playoffs, rankings will be less subjective. Guest host Wade Goodwyn checks in with NPR's Mike Pesca for a preview of the sports ahead: the start of the NFL season, the concussion settlement and a look at the 2013 college football.

Around the Nation
7:14 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Austin Lakefront Institution Closes Doors For Lack Of Water

Dockside at Carlos 'n Charlie's on Lake Travis.
Pete Clark

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:54 pm

Carlos 'n Charlie's restaurant on Lake Travis in Austin, Texas, will be having its last last call on Monday. But don't bother coming by boat.

The restaurant has been a lakeside hotspot since it opened in 1995. Back then, docking at the restaurant's wharf was a popular way to take in the party atmosphere, which part-owner Pete Clark describes as like "a cheap Spring break movie."

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National Security
7:14 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Obama's Sudden Shift On Syria

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:54 pm

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Wade Goodwyn. Rachel Martin is away. Syrians and the world have spent the last week bracing for a U.S. attack on Damascus that seemed to be imminent. Now, President Obama has surprised everyone by pushing the pause button and by announcing yesterday in the Rose Garden that he will go to Congress for approval. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports from the White House.

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National Security
7:14 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Pentagon Is Cautious On Possible Syria Strikes

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 9:23 am

Military officials are concerned that a limited strike against Syria could prompt the Assad regime to target civilians with more conventional weapons. Guest host Wade Goodwyn speaks with NPR's Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman.

Middle East
7:14 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Assad Supporters Cheer Obama's Decision To Wait For Syria Strike

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 9:23 am

The Syrian president's supporters celebrated when President Obama announced he would seek Congress's approval for a military strike. But rebel forces fighting for President Bashar Assad's ouster were dismayed.

Economy
7:14 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Making It On Minimum Wage

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 9:23 am

Joanna Cruz, a New Jersey mother of three who works as a cook at a convenience store, wrote in an online essay that "too often, people think that individuals on public assistance programs are lazy. I would like for them to spend one day in my shoes." She shares what it's like to support a family on minimum wage with guest host Wade Goodwyn.

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