The Two-Way
6:37 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Top Stories: Day 2 Of Government Shutdown; Jobs Report

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 8:13 am

Good morning, here are our early stories:

-- Shutdown Solution? There's None To Be Seen Just Yet.

-- 166,000 Jobs Added In September, Survey Says.

And here are more early headlines:

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The Two-Way
6:35 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Job Growth Was Modest In September, Survey Signals

This gas station in Encinitas, Calif., was looking to hire last month.
Mike Blake Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 11:46 am

Private employers added 166,000 jobs to their payrolls in September, a modest gain after slightly less growth the month before, according to the latest ADP National Employment Report.

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The Two-Way
5:25 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Shutdown Solution? None To Be Seen Yet, But Sides Will Talk

The Lincoln Memorial is officially closed. National parks and monuments are among the parts of the federal government affected by the shutdown.
Dennis Brack Landov

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 4:16 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Mara Liasson on the government shutdown

(We most recently updated this post at 8:31 p.m. ET.)

We said it Tuesday: "No end in sight."

The story's the same a day later.

Pardon us for being repetitive, but there's no end in sight to the partial shutdown of the federal government.

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Around the Nation
5:23 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Grandma's Gone, But She Lives On In Google

Dustin Moore of Portland, Oregon, was browsing around town on Google Street View when he spotted a familiar face. The image taken of his late grandma Alice's house captured her sitting on her front stoop, soaking up some sun and reading the paper. Moore says it's one of the last photos taken of her — she died last year.

It's All Politics
5:20 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Wednesday Morning Political Mix

A visitor to the federally run Folk Art Center in Asheville, N.C., on Tuesday expressed the dismay many felt because of the government shutdown.
Chuck Burton AP

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 6:30 am

It's Day Two of the Federal Government Shutdown, 2013 edition with no end in sight.

So there's a heavy focus on shutdown-related items or themes today in this morning's political mix of items and themes that caught my eye:

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Around the Nation
5:16 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Police Mistakenly Sent Text About Upcoming Drug Deal

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

This happens again and again. A man planning a drug deal mistakenly sends a text message to the police. It's happened so often, it could be some kind of case study for psychologists. The latest alleged seller was Nicholas Delear of New Jersey, who sent his message to the wrong guy and met up later with an undercover cop.

People, there is no point worrying about NSA electronic surveillance when you perform surveillance on yourself.

The Two-Way
5:15 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Book News: Forward Prize For Poetry Goes To Michael Symmons Roberts

Michael Symmons Roberts, pictured in 2004, has been described as "a religious poet in a secular age."
Gareth Cattermole Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 7:52 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Margaret Drabble Spins A Mother-Daughter Yarn Into 'Gold'

Mark Rose iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:02 pm

When I think of the writers I worshiped when I was starting out in life, I always think of Margaret Drabble. She was 20 years older than I, but the serious, hip, intellectual British novelist whose black-and-white photo appeared on the front cover of some of her paperbacks seemed permanently young. Reading her was like having an extremely brainy and fashionable best friend who'd been educated at Cambridge and had really lived.

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Tom Banse covers business, environment, public policy, human interest and national news across the Northwest. He reports from well known and out–of–the–way places in the region where important, amusing, touching, or outrageous events are unfolding. Tom's stories can be heard during "Morning Edition," "Weekday," and "All Things Considered" on NPR stations in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho.

Latin America
2:52 am
Wed October 2, 2013

'Castrocare' Divides Doctors In Cuba, Brazil

Cuba is sending thousands of badly needed doctors to Brazil, but Brazil's medical establishment has sought to block the program. Here, Cuban Dr. Yocelin Macias treats a patient in the capital Brasilia on Aug. 30.
Eraldo Peres AP

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 7:48 am

Call it "Castrocare." Cuba's former leader Fidel Castro sent doctors abroad for decades to work throughout Latin America and as far away as Africa.

In some cases, like Haiti, the medical missions were seen as purely humanitarian. In other places, like Venezuela, it was a form of barter that provided Cuba with subsidized oil imports.

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