The Two-Way
6:19 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Top Stories: Syrian Peace Talks Falter; Deadly Cairo Blasts

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 9:09 am

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The Two-Way
6:12 am
Fri January 24, 2014

30 Elderly Residents Still Missing After Fire In Quebec

A firefighter walks past what is left of a seniors home in L'Isle Verte, Quebec. At least five people died and 30 are still missing after a fire there. The water used to fight the flames has frozen into ice that is a foot thick in places.
Mathieu Belanger Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 9:38 am

Eight people are known to have died and the families of about 30 others are "bracing for the worst" as the search resumes for victims of Thursday's fire at a home for senior citizens in eastern Quebec.

Correspondent Dan Karpenchuk says in a report for our Newscast Desk that:

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The Two-Way
5:29 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Book News: Amazon Says It Hopes Polish, Czech Workers Won't Unionize

Amazon shipments sit in the packet and parcel section of the Royal Mail's Swan Valley mail center in Northampton, England.
Matthew Lloyd Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
5:10 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Mediator: Syria, Opposition Will Have Face-To-Face Meeting

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 11:48 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Deborah Amos reports from the Syria peace talks

Update at 12:36 p.m. ET. A Face-To-Face Meeting:

After arduous talks about talks, there seems to be some kind of breakthrough in Geneva, Switzerland, this afternoon: International mediator Lakhdar Brahimi said delegations from the Syrian government and its opposition will meet face-to-face for the first time on Saturday.

According to Reuters, Brahimi told reporters that both sides had accepted the principles of the Geneva Communiqué.

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Poetry
5:02 am
Fri January 24, 2014

60 Years Of Poems Mix Anger, Ambivalence And Authority

detail from cover of The Poetry of Derek Walcott
Courtesy of Farrar, Straus, and Giroux

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 9:28 am

Derek Walcott, who won the Nobel Prize in 1992, is one of the biggest living figures on the world literary scene. He is a celebrated playwright and a painter, but a new selection of his work focuses on the achievement for which he is best-known: his poetry.

Walcott's home, and the gravitational center of his writing, is the Caribbean Island of St. Lucia, which was tossed restlessly between French and English colonial overlords for hundreds of years until it finally achieved independence in 1979.

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Business
5:00 am
Fri January 24, 2014

David's Bridal Goes Upscale Near Beverly Hills

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 5:29 am

David's Bridal is famously known for carrying inexpensive bridal dresses, some for less than $100. Now the company wants to offer an elevated experience for brides to be — with chandeliers, marble tiling and plush chairs. There will be price tags to match — as much as 2,000.

The Two-Way
4:44 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Mobs Blame Muslim Brotherhood After Bombs Rock Cairo

A man carries an Egyptian police officer to an ambulance after Friday's blast at the Egyptian police headquarters in downtown Cairo.
Khalil Hamra AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 9:09 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Leila Fadel reports from Cairo

Update at 11:05 a.m. ET: There's been a fourth blast in Cairo. We've added that development to the top of this post.

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Alice Fordham is an NPR International Correspondent based in Beirut, Lebanon.

In this role, she reports on Lebanon, Syria and many of the countries throughout the Middle East.

Before joining NPR in 2014, Fordham covered the Middle East for five years, reporting for The Washington Post, the Economist, The Times and other publications. She has worked in wars and political turmoil but also amid beauty, resilience and fun.

In 2011, Fordham was a Stern Fellow at the Washington Post. That same year she won the Next Century Foundation's Breakaway award, in part for an investigation into Iraqi prisons.

Fordham graduated from Cambridge University with a Bachelor of Arts in Classics.

Around the Nation
3:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Drinking Water Not Tested For Tens Of Thousands Of Chemicals

Al Jones of the West Virginia Department of General Services tests water as he flushes faucets and opens a rest room at the State Capitol in Charleston, W. Va., on Jan. 13, four days after a chemical spill into the Elk River. It wasn't until Jan. 21 that state officials were told by Freedom Industries that a second contaminant had also entered the river.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 6:48 pm

The fact that a second contaminant in West Virginia's drinking water eluded detection for nearly two weeks — despite intense testing of the water — reveals an important truth about how companies test drinking water: In most cases, they only find the contaminants they're looking for.

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Around the Nation
3:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Small Museum Shows Off Weird Objects

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 5:29 am

In this encore report, we hear about a small museum in an elevator shaft in lower Manhattan. It's only six feet square, and only about three or four people can enter it at a time. The exhibits document the weird and wonderful of modern life, including prison contraband made from bread. (This piece originally aired on Jan. 2, 2014 on All Things Considered).

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