Politics

History
3:29 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Analyzing How Presidents Wage War

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:08 am

Virtually every president before President Obama has viewed the 1973 War Powers Act as unconstitutional, says historian Michael Beschloss. In a conversation with Renee Montagne, Beschloss analyzes Obama's decision to seek congressional approval for military action in Syria — and what it says about his presidency.

Middle East
3:11 am
Tue September 10, 2013

2 Democratic Senators Propose Alternate Plan For Syria

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:08 am

President Obama on Tuesday meets with Democratic senators to press his case for military action against Syria. Two moderate senators are offering an alternative plan. It would delay military action for 45 days, and give Bashar Assad another chance to get rid of his chemical weapons. Steve Inskeep talks to Sen. Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota about the plan.

Politics
3:11 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Tea Party Won't Let Congress Forget Obamacare Issues

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:08 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Congress did not expect to spend September debating Syria. Many Republicans, instead, were planning battles over the budget and over the healthcare law that's about to take affect. Tea Party activists are going ahead with meetings on their issues. One event comes in Washington D.C. today. NPR's Don Gonyea has been talking with activists.

Read more
Middle East
3:11 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Obama Prepares For Speech On Syria

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:08 am

On Tuesday night, President Obama will address the nation — asking for support of his plan to punish the Syrian regime for a chemical weapons attack near Damascus last month. The president must deal with widespread skepticism about his plan.

Politics
1:39 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Colorado Voters To Decide 2 Lawmakers' Fates In Recall Elections

State Sens. Angela Giron and John Morse, both Democrats, face recall elections Tuesday. The battle in Colorado has attracted major players from across the nation, reflecting the sustained intensity over the issue of gun rights.
Ed Andrieski AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 12:01 pm

Two prominent Democratic state senators could lose their jobs after lawmakers passed sweeping gun control laws following the theater shooting in Auro, Colo., and the Newtown school shooting in Connecticut. Gun rights activists collected enough signatures to force the historic recall elections.

The recalls follow a combative and bitter legislative session. Among the most controversial measures passed were universal background checks and limiting high-capacity magazines to 15 rounds.

Read more
It's All Politics
3:42 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Constituent Mailbag: A Deluge Of Opposition To Syria Strikes

Protesters against U.S. military action in Syria march to Capitol Hill from the White House on Saturday.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 4:28 pm

Rep. Jim Himes is willing to vote against the wishes of his constituents. Probably not this time, though.

"Like the rest of the country, my constituency is pretty much opposed to the intervention in Syria," says the Connecticut Democrat. "Since health care reform, I haven't seen an issue that energized as many people."

His colleagues in the House and Senate report the same.

Read more
NPR Story
2:57 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Congress Returns Facing Work Besides Syria Resolution

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 5:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, when Representative Cole and his colleagues return to Capitol Hill today, they will hear about Syria from administration officials.

NPR congressional correspondent Tamara Keith reports.

Read more
NPR Story
2:57 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Rep. Cole Weighs In On Syria Resolution

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 5:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Seeking to win support in Congress for air strikes on Syria, President Obama addresses the nation tomorrow and also gives a series of TV interviews today. Syrian president Bashar al-Assad is also going to America's airwaves. Asked on CBS if a strike on his country could provoke a retaliation involving chemical weapons, this was his response.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:28 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Obama Presses Lawmakers For Authorization On Syria

Vice President Joe Biden stands in front of his residence at the Naval Observatory in Washington, D.C., on Sunday, as President Obama arrives at a dinner Biden is hosting for Republican senators.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 10:02 am

President Obama is ratcheting up pressure on lawmakers to support his request for limited U.S. military strikes in Syria. The White House says the Syrian government is responsible for a chemical weapons attack last month near the capital, Damascus.

On Sunday night, the president stopped by a dinner Vice President Joe Biden was holding for Republican senators.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:13 am
Sun September 8, 2013

Syria Developments: Debate In Washington; Assad Speaks To Rose

The Greek Orthodox monastery of Mar Takla in the Syrian Christian town of Maaloula is seen on Sept. 7. The town is now controlled by a rebel group with al-Qaida ties.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 3:05 pm

We're following several stories regarding Syria Sunday, including new comments from Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. There are also reports that an Islamist group with ties to al-Qaida has seized a town with a large Christian population. Elsewhere, officials in the U.S. and its allies are debating how to respond to the conflict that began in 2011, as President Obama's administration tries to shore up support for military action.

We'll update this post with news as it emerges today.

Update at 5 p.m. ET: Sampling Of Political Debate

Read more
The U.S. Response To Syria
1:40 pm
Sat September 7, 2013

Syria Puts Obama's Multilateralist Philosophy To The Test

President Obama holds a press conference in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Friday on the sideline of the G-20 summit.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 11:11 pm

President Obama has come home from the Group of 20 summit with essentially no more international support for a strike on Syria than when he left the U.S.

He spent the last three days in Sweden and Russia, lobbying U.S. allies on the sidelines and on the public stage, with little movement.

The conflict has presented perhaps the biggest challenge yet to Obama's multilateralist inclinations.

'A Hard Sell'

Read more
Around the Nation
5:23 am
Sat September 7, 2013

Progressive De Blasio Leads New York Mayoral Race

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 11:01 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

New York City voters go to the polls next Tuesday to choose their party's candidates to try to succeed three-term mayor, Michael Bloomberg. Anna Sale of member station WNYC has this look at the Democratic frontrunner.

Read more
Middle East
5:23 am
Sat September 7, 2013

Obama Wins Support From Only Half Of G-20

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 11:01 am

The president is back in Washington Saturday after spending several days trying to convince world leaders at the G-20 summit in Russia that a U.S. strike against Syria is necessary. Ten of the G-20 leaders signed a statement in support of U.S. action. The other half remain wary.

It's All Politics
3:38 am
Sat September 7, 2013

Vulnerable Senators Straddle The Syria Fence

Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.
Timothy D. Easley AP

President Obama has mustered limited international support for a military strike on Syria, stirred uncertainty about what he'll do if Congress fails endorse a strike (it may depend on the meaning of "intention") and faces growing Capitol Hill resistance.

Read more
It's All Politics
4:14 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Opponents of Syria Strikes Gain Edge In Lobbying Fight

President Obama answers a question regarding the situation in Syria during his news conference at the G-20 Summit in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Friday.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 4:35 am

The interest groups opposed to U.S. military strikes against Syria had a very good week. That made it a very bad week for President Obama and those who support his plans.

Anna Galland, executive director of the liberal MoveOn.org — which opposes military action in Syria — said that by midweek, her group's members reported making 10,000 calls to Congress, contributing to an avalanche of calls from citizens opposed to military strikes.

Read more
It's All Politics
2:46 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

GOP Congressman: 'Constitutional Crisis' If Obama Bucks Vote

Indiana Rep. Luke Messer is one of few House Republicans who publicly back military action in Syria.
Michael Conroy AP

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 4:49 pm

President Obama on Friday declined to say whether he'd go ahead with military action in Syria if Congress votes against it — a what-if scenario that's attracting growing attention in the wake of preliminary House head counts that suggest there's nowhere near enough votes for passage.

It's a question that won't be answered until late next week when Congress is expected to vote.

Read more
The Protojournalist
10:43 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Quick Question: Can Only The Rich Be President?

Donald Trump says he is considering running for president in 2016.
Robin Marchant Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 11:31 am

Do you have to be rich to be president of the United States of America?

Donald Trump told ABC News recently that he might run for president in 2016 and that he is qualified because, among other reasons, he has amassed a net worth of more than $10 billion. "I'd spend a lot" on a campaign, he says. "I'd spend whatever it took."

Read more
Barbershop
10:04 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Gearing Up For Football Season

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 8:36 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Economy
10:04 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Five Years After Wall Street Collapsed, What's Changed?

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 8:36 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later, it sounds like a bad walks-into-a-bar joke, but it wasn't. Recently, a representative of the KKK had a sit-down with members of the NAACP. This took place in Casper, Wyoming. Reporter Jeremy Fugleberg was there for the whole thing, and tells us what happened. That's in just a few minutes.

Read more
Politics
10:04 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Republicans Divided Over Potential Strike On Syria

Republican congressional leaders support an American military strike in Syria, but the rank-and-file membership is divided. GOP Congressmen Doug Collins of Georgia and Luke Messer of Indiana serve on the House Committee on Foreign Affairs. They talk about the debate in the Republican caucus.

Politics
5:33 am
Fri September 6, 2013

What It's Like Living In A Bankrupt City

Some of the many boarded up store fronts along Weber Street in Stockton, Calif., in 2012. The Stockton City Council voted to declare bankruptcy last year, making it the largest city in U.S. history to enter Chapter 9 to that time.
Peter DaSilva EPA /Landov

Crime has been bad on the south side of Stockton. Katherine Anderson, a lifelong resident of the Northern California city, says she's almost gotten used to hearing shots fired in her neighborhood.

Stockton has long had a problem with drugs. But there's been more crime because Stockton is broke.

Until Detroit's recent filing, Stockton's bankruptcy was the largest in U.S. history. Given widespread police layoffs and retirements, the city's gang intervention and narcotics teams have both closed shop. The result was a murder rate that last year broke all local records.

Read more
It's All Politics
5:18 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Q&A: How To Do Political Coverage Better In The Twitter Age

Reporters watch the final minutes of the presidential debate between President Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney last October in Denver.
Doug Pensinger Getty Images

Curious about how social media sped up news cycles, amplified trivial events on the trail and enabled Washington's "worst tendencies" during the 2012 presidential race, one of the nation's top young political reporters decided to take a deeper look.

Read more
Politics
3:05 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Primary Election For NYC Comptroller Heats Up

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:40 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

When Eliot Spitzer, the former governor of New York who quit in disgrace, entered the race for the lower profile job of New York City comptroller, that sleepy contest was suddenly front page news. Many observers started writing political obituaries for Spitzer's opponent. But with just days to go, the race is not too close to call, as NPR's Joel Rose reports.

JOEL ROSE, BYLINE: Eliot Spitzer is the first to admit he's made a few mistakes.

(SOUNDBITE OF CAMPAIGN AD)

Read more
National Security
3:05 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Secretary Napolitano Finishes Up At Homeland Security

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:40 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Today is Janet Napolitano's last day as Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. Napolitano is leaving Washington D.C., heading for California, to become at the end of this month, president of the University of California System. NPR's Brian Naylor sat down with Napolitano yesterday for a look back at her tenure as head of one of the government's largest and most complex departments.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:05 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Rural County Wants To Secede From California

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:40 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's talk next with a man who wants to secede from his state. The Board of Supervisors of a northern California county voted this week to take their county out of California. Michael Kobseff is one of the supervisors who voted yes in Siskiyou County with an eye to joining other counties in northern California, as well as southern Oregon, to form their own state. He's on the line. Welcome to the program, sir.

MICHAEL KOBSEFF: Thank you.

Read more
Shots - Health News
12:54 am
Fri September 6, 2013

After A Decade, Congress Moves To Fix Doctors' Medicare Pay

I think I see the problem.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 5:59 am

Hear the words health care and Congress, and you think fight, right?

And you'd be forgiven, particularly because the House has now voted some 40 times in the past two years to repeal or otherwise undo portions of the Affordable Care Act.

Read more
It's All Politics
4:03 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Even In An Obama Stronghold, Voters Saying 'No' On Syria

Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., gestures as he speaks in an Oversight Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in May 22.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 4:31 pm

Among the hurdles in the House to authorizing U.S. strikes on Syria: Many lawmakers say that back home there's very little support for military action.

Read more
It's All Politics
11:45 am
Thu September 5, 2013

The Senator Who Dodged The Syria Vote

President Obama and now-Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass., wave during a campaign rally for Markey in Boston's Roxbury neighborhood on June 12.
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 1:09 pm

It's hard to imagine a rookie senator who's better equipped to confront a complicated issue like Syria than Massachusetts Democrat Ed Markey.

Read more
Politics
9:56 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Progressive Democrats Doubt Syria Strategy

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Education
9:56 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Ranking Schools Based On What Matters

President Obama recently proposed a new college ranking system, based on more than test scores. The Washington Monthly has been doing that for years. Host Michel Martin finds out more.

Pages