Politics

Political news

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

One of the biggest stories of the election cycle is turnout (as we've reported a few times now): Republican turnout has spiked far beyond 2012 levels, and Democratic turnout has fallen off after the party's mammoth 2008.

The tone and the turnout are vastly different between Republicans and Democrats this year, but oddly enough, both sides have something crucial in common: their voters are far less moderate than they were in their last primaries.

It's essentially impossible to win the Democratic nomination without support from women.

In primaries and caucuses across the country, women make up a solid majority of the Democratic electorate. In fact, according to exit poll data, there's not a state that's voted to date where women made up less than 54 percent of Democratic voters. And, in Mississippi, women made up nearly two-thirds (64 percent) of Democratic primary voters.

During an exchange over how high to raise the minimum wage in Thursday night's Democratic debate, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders began to shout over each other, hands raised, fingers pointed, both seeming to get a bit red in the face, while the audience cheered and booed in equal parts.

It was quite a scene. As NPR's Ron Elving put it, "Both Sanders and Clinton showed flashes of animosity bordering on contempt."

President Obama is throwing his weight behind a plan that would lead to competition in the market for set-top cable and satellite TV boxes. Most viewers now rent the boxes from their TV providers. The Federal Communications Commission wants to make it easier for viewers to buy the devices.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump has based his presidential campaign on resentment toward the establishment, and some alarmed Republicans have called for national leaders to take Trump down.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Bernie-mania hit Vatican City today with a crush of Italian media, cameras, boom microphones, shouting reporters and a ring of civilians, smartphones held aloft, chanting "Bernie, Bernie, Bernie!"

Sanders was not there to meet with Pope Francis, who is on the road himself visiting a refugee camp in Greece. The Democratic hopeful had accepted an invitation from the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences to speak at a conference on social and economic justice.

Donald Trump's Colorado supporters are gathering at the state capital Friday to make some noise about a political process they say has left them voiceless. The backlash from Trump's supporters has included thousands of voicemails and texts a day to the state Republican Party's chairman, some threatening, after his phone number was leaked online.

If Bernie Sanders surprises pollsters and confounds expectations in the New York primary on Tuesday, April 19, his backers and staff will trumpet the effect of his ninth debate with rival Hillary Clinton on the night of April 14.

They will say the relentlessly aggressive strategy Sanders pursued in the latest CNN debate, with its steady stream of attacks on Clinton, provided the defining moment in a long campaign for a nomination that remains up for grabs.

This story is part of an election-year project focused on how voters' needs of government are shaped by where they live. NPR will explore parts of the country not on the primary calendar and not crowded with journalists following each twist of campaign season. First up: Illinois, the state that most broadly represents America in terms of race, income, age, religion and education.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Organizing for Action, the grass-roots network born from the Obama campaigns, is now deep in the battle over confirming the president's nominee to the Supreme Court. These days, OFA is a nonprofit that organizes on progressive issues and trains future grass-roots gurus.

"You know this is very much an organization that is led by people out in their communities who care about the issues of the day," said Buffy Wicks, a member of OFA's board of advisers and a veteran of Obama's two presidential campaigns and his White House.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

"New York values" got a lot of love from Republicans in New York City on Thursday night.

All three Republican presidential hopefuls attended the New York State Republican Gala, a $1,000-a-plate fundraiser for the state GOP. It took place just days before New York's primary, which comes amid an unusually contentious campaign for the nomination.

In substance, the ninth Democratic debate was essentially a recap of previous ones. In style, it was new — sharp and contentious, as Clinton and Sanders clashed on guns, Wall Street, minimum wage and "judgment." Clinton hit Sanders hard for being long on ideals but short on practicality. "It's easy to diagnose the problem," she said. "It's harder to do something about the problem." Sanders attacked Clinton for proposing incremental policies. "Incrementalism and those little steps are not enough," he said. Clinton apologized for the consequences of the 1994 crime bill.

Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders faced off Thursday in one of the more contentious debates in the Democratic nomination fight to date.

The CNN-hosted debate in Brooklyn — where both campaigns have headquarters — comes just days ahead of the April 19 New York primary.

Trailing Clinton in polls and delegates, the Vermont senator kept up a steady stream of familiar attacks against the front-runner in an effort to carry on the recent string of victories he's enjoyed in nominating contests.

This week, a Florida prosecutor announced he would not move forward with a battery charge against Corey Lewandowski, Donald Trump's campaign manager. Lewandowski had been charged after video surfaced showing him grabbing and pulling former Breitbart reporter Michelle Fields after a Trump press conference on March 8 at Trump International Golf Club in Jupiter, Fla.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This was supposed to be a quiet week for Mike Rendino. He manages Stan's, the bar across the street from Yankee Stadium, and the Yankees are in Toronto.

Instead, it's been bedlam.

Rendino said he's "been inundated with phone calls, emails, contacts on Facebook from the strangers, most random people. The New York Times, the Washington Post."

Bernie Sanders' campaign took to Twitter on Thursday morning to denounce comments made by one of his surrogates at Wednesday night's massive rally in Washington Square Park in New York City.

It was more than an hour before Sanders took the stage, when Sanders supporter Dr. Paul Song said something that earned cheers from the crowd — and outrage from supporters of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Pages