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Ohio Gov. John Kasich is campaigning in New Hampshire today in advance of that state's first-in-the-nation presidential primary, which will be held one week from Tuesday.

While most presidential candidates are spending this weekend in Iowa, Kasich is hoping to break out of the crowded Republican field in the Granite State, and said today if he doesn't, it may be the end of the road for his candidacy.

"If I get snuffed out, I go home — end of story," Kasich said while urging voters to support him.

Kasich held his final event in Iowa on Friday.

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz is known for being one of the most disliked men in Washington. As he tries to win over voters, his wife Heidi Cruz is trying to vouch for his character and show people that he has a softer side.

Iowa's process of picking its choice for president is complicated. We try to demystify it in this space.

Here are the basics:

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There are different ways to reach voters. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders delivers fiery speeches that fill concert halls and arenas. But generally speaking, people don't leave Hillary Clinton events ready to start a political revolution. Big speeches and soaring rhetoric really aren't her thing.

Instead, the former secretary of state is trying to win voters over by being a wonk who delivers page after page of policy white papers. As Clinton makes her closing argument in Iowa, "in my plan" has to be the most oft repeated phrase in her stump speech.

Harry Rubenstein is deep in a thought about a log cabin when he pauses, mid-sentence, and disappears down a corridor.

He returns a moment later brandishing a large wooden ax.

Rubenstein is the chair of the political history division at the Smithsonian Museum of American History, and he's standing in a room that's packed with about 100,000 items from previous presidential elections. The collection, he says, ranges "from a little bit before the American Revolution, to probably last week."

Every four years when the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primary roll around, the critics and cynics question why such unrepresentative patches of America get to vote first in presidential nominating contests. Why is so much political power, they complain, given to states that are more white and more rural than the rest of the country?

The big news about Hillary Clinton's emails came earlier today: 22 emails she sent on her controversial private server while at the State Department have been deemed top secret and won't be released to the public.

The State Department reiterated Friday that "these documents were not marked classified at the time they were sent," something the Clinton campaign has been arguing the whole time. Her campaign also pushed back against what is sees as "overclassification run amok."

What does The Internet call a woman who scares Donald Trump out of a presidential debate?

a) Bitch
b) Slut
c) Whore
d) Bimbo
e) Megyn Kelly
f) All of the above

This week, the answer was F. Let us explain.

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This year, just in time for the New Hampshire primary, NPR's political team has a gift for you: everything you need to know about the caucuses and this election season in one handy PDF.

We're giving you behind-the-scenes access to the network's 2016 New Hampshire and Iowa Briefing Book.

Inside you'll find everything you need to get ready for Tuesday. Starting with: When are polls open? How many delegates are at stake? And what could turnout look like?

The way Donald Trump sees it, he was still the big winner of Thursday night's Fox News debate, even though he wasn't on stage.

And at his campaign rally Friday in Nashua, N.H., the billionaire real estate mogul singled out the biggest loser — top rival Ted Cruz.

The Texas senator "got really pummeled," Trump said. He later joked that Cruz, who Trump has argued is not qualified to be president because he was born in Canada, was "an anchor baby in Canada."

Since 1972, Iowa has held the first presidential nominating contests in the country. Over the years, the Iowa caucuses have grown in size, scope and importance, sometimes launching underdogs to the presidency or upsetting established political juggernauts.

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With the Iowa caucuses just days away, the NPR Politics Podcast team is joined by special guest Clay Masters, the host of Morning Edition on Iowa Public Radio. Clay, who's covering the presidential campaign, talks about his experience knocking on doors with both the Clinton and Sanders campaigns.

The team also looks at big moments from the latest, Trump-less, Republican debate and gets into the latest evolution of social media in politics — the negative Snapchat filter.

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Well, now to our Friday political commentators, columnists David Brooks of The New York Times, who's with me in the studio, and E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post, who's at Iowa Public Radio in Ames, Iowa. Hello to both of you.

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As any bridge player can tell you, the game is different when there is no trump.

On Thursday night in Des Moines, Iowa, the seventh debate among major candidates for president in the Republican Party set a new standard in both substance and tone. And it did so because the front-runner in the 2016 nomination fight, Donald J. Trump, did not attend.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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22 Hillary Clinton Emails Dubbed Top Secret

Jan 29, 2016

This post was updated at 4:45 p.m. ET

Controversy grew on Friday over emails from Hillary Clinton's private server she used while at the State Department, with the agency announcing several documents would be withheld because they had been deemed top secret.

This week, NPR asked voters around the country how they are feeling about this election, and why so many tell us they are anxious or angry.

The last presidential debate before the Iowa caucuses, hosted by the Fox News Channel, brought some surprises.

Donald Trump, who helped Fox reach 24 million viewers in the first debate, decided not to attend. He thought moderator Megyn Kelly treated him unfairly in last August's debate and didn't want to suffer a repeat offense. Instead, Trump hosted his own event — apparently a benefit for veterans — during the debate.

Get Caught Up:

  1. In the Trump-less debate, arrows were shot at Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, who was center stage. He complained Fox News was trying to goad his rivals to attack him, taking on a Trump-ian line. The sharpest elbows were thrown between Cruz and Rubio over immigration after Fox News showed past clips of each of them espousing different views and having to defend whether or not they were opposed to legalization for immigrants in the country illegally.

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