Politics

NPR Story
10:59 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Ex-Rep. Lindy Boggs: Advocate For Women, Dedicated To Family

Cokie Roberts (far left) and Steve Roberts with Cokie's mother, Lindy Boggs, and children Lee and Rebecca in 1969.
Courtesy of Cokie and Steve Roberts

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 11:01 am

Lindy Boggs died Saturday morning. She was 97 years old, had served in Congress for close to 20 years and also as the U.S. ambassador to the Vatican, appointed by President Bill Clinton.

But those achievements, great as they are, do not begin to sum up the life and accomplishments of Lindy Boggs. As many of you know, she is part of our family at NPR: Her daughter is Cokie Roberts. And she has many friends here, as she does everywhere.

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The Two-Way
9:33 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Former Louisiana Congresswoman Lindy Boggs Dies At 97

Former Democratic Rep. Lindy Claiborne Boggs attends the Distinguished Service Award ceremony at the Capitol in May 2006 in Washington, D.C.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 10:51 am

Former Rep. Lindy Boggs, the first woman elected to Congress from Louisiana and an ardent civil rights campaigner, has died at age 97.

Boggs went to Congress after a special election to succeed her late husband, Thomas Hale Boggs, Sr., who had died in a plane crash in Alaska. She served in the House for nearly two decades.

She died of natural causes at her home in Chevy Chase, Md., according to her daughter, NPR senior news analyst and ABC News journalist Cokie Roberts.

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News
3:47 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Emergency Summit On Urban Violence Opens In Chicago

A sidewalk memorial in Chicago remembers Eugene Clark, 25, who was shot and killed last weekend. In the same weekend, the city had at least 6 people killed and 22 wounded by gunfire. This weekend, the Congressional Black Caucus held a summit in Chicago to discuss violence in urban areas.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 10:59 am

Rep. Robin Kelly, one of the hosts of the urban violence summit in Chicago, said at the outset Friday that this wouldn't be just another summit.

"Maybe just some of you are tired of having your leaders hold summits that are long on talk and short on action," she told attendees. "Today's summit aims to be different."

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Politics
2:29 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

NYC Tabloids Go Gaga Over Naughty Pols

March 2008 front pages
New York Post/New York Daily News

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 2:38 pm

Anthony Weiner and Eliot Spitzer have been very good to the New York tabloids.

First, they delivered lurid scandals for cheeky newspaper headline writers to work with. That's like rocket fuel for the tabs, which thrive on conflict and scandal and aren't nearly as cautious and measured as the broadsheets.

Then, after resigning from office — Weiner from Congress, Spitzer from the governorship — each decided to make an against-all-odds return to elected politics this year.

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It's All Politics
1:43 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

McConnell's Kentucky Challenger Gets Her Act Together

Democratic Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes raises her game in a video about her challenge to GOP Sen. Mitch McConnell.
Grimes For Senate

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 1:52 pm

Maybe the Democrat who hopes to unseat Sen. Mitch McConnell is ready for prime time after all.

That's one way to view the highly polished Web video in which Alison Lundergan Grimes, Kentucky's secretary of state, appears, employing humor, pathos, earnestness and her grandmothers to skewer the leader of the Senate Republicans.

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Politics
10:08 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Should Congress Stop 'Drawing Lines In The Sand'?

Guest host Celeste Headlee gets a wrap of the week's political news with journalist Callie Crossley and conservative commentator Lenny McAllister. They talk about President Obama's push to get the economy back on track, and the battle over the President's health care law.

Barbershop
10:08 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Have New Yorkers Seen Too Much Of Anthony Weiner?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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Race
10:08 am
Fri July 26, 2013

What's On The National Urban League's Agenda This Year?

Jobs are the focus of this year's National Urban League Conference in Philadelphia. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with President and CEO Marc Morial, about how the League has progressed on that front, and asks about the biggest issues facing African-Americans today.

'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup
7:10 am
Fri July 26, 2013

It's All Politics, July 25, 2013

Eric Thayer Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 7:25 am

  • Listen to the Roundup

All good things must come to an end. NPR's Ken Rudin and Ron Elving, for the final time, weigh in on the political news of the week. New York mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner is enbroiled in another sexting saga, President Obama delivers his most expansive comments on race and Mitch McConnell now has a Tea Party challenger. The guys also make 2014 and 2016 predictions, plus read farewell comments from The Listener.

The Two-Way
5:10 am
Fri July 26, 2013

San Diego Mayor Says He Will Enter Treatment Clinic

San Diego Mayor Bob Filner (D) on Thursday.
Sam Hodgson Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 1:19 pm

Update at 3:07 p.m. ET. Entering Treatment Clinic:

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Politics
4:48 am
Fri July 26, 2013

White House Tries Star Power To Sell Health Insurance

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 5:33 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: A healthy resistance.

The success of President Obama's health care law depends a lot on whether healthy 20- and 30-somethings will end up buying insurance. At first, the administration was hoping to recruit pro football stars in its PR push, but after a couple of Republicans sent the NFL a letter, that didn't happen. So now the White House is turning to celebrities - names like Michael Cera, Jennifer Hudson and Amy Poehler were reportedly in Washington this week.

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The Two-Way
4:49 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Holder Seeks Continued Oversight Of Texas Election Laws

Attorney General Eric Holder speaks at the National Urban League annual conference on Thursday in Philadelphia.
Matt Rourke Associated Press

Attorney General Eric Holder says the Justice Department will ask a federal court to subject Texas to the same kind of scrutiny that was required of it by a section of the Voting Rights Act struck down last month by the Supreme Court.

In Shelby County v. Holder, the high court rescinded Section 5 of the 1965 act, which required several states including Texas that had a history of voter discrimination to get "pre-clearance" from the federal government before changing their election laws.

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Politics
3:12 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Rep. Cole: Savings Need To Continue, But Compromise Is Possible

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:43 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This week, President Obama is travelling around the country talking up ideas to strengthen the middle class, but those ideas are given very little chance of passage in the Republican-controlled House of Representatives. Well, to hear their side, we turn now to Republican Representative Tom Cole of Oklahoma, who's a member of the House Appropriations' Committee. Congressman Cole is also a deputy majority whip. Welcome back to the program.

REPRESENTATIVE TOM COLE: Robert, great to be with you.

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It's All Politics
1:37 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Pelosi Says Weiner Should 'Get A Clue'; Popularity Dives In NYC

Huma Abedin (right) glances at her husband, New York City mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner, as he speaks at a press conference Tuesday.
Kathy Willens AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 5:48 pm

(Updated 6:50 p.m. EDT)

Democrat Anthony Weiner's path to the New York City mayor's office got a lot more complicated Thursday, just two days after he asserted that new revelations of his lewd online conduct would not chase him from the race for his party's nomination.

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The Two-Way
10:17 am
Thu July 25, 2013

House Republicans Back End To Door-Side Mail Service

This "curbside" delivery would remain, but "door-to-door" service would end under a new proposal.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 1:12 pm

The age-old standoff between mail carrier and Canis familiaris could be coming to an end if the latest plan to save the Postal Service goes ahead.

The proposal, approved by a House committee on Wednesday, would end door-to-door delivery by 2022. Instead, postal carriers would limit their deliveries to curbside — meaning boxes at the end of driveways — or to cluster boxes, a staple of many apartment complexes.

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Politics
10:06 am
Thu July 25, 2013

White House Talks Income Gap: New Ideas About Old Problems?

President Obama's economic speaking tour seems reminiscent of campaign speeches in 2008. Guest host Celeste Headlee asks NPR's Ron Elving why the White House is sending this message again.

Economy
10:06 am
Thu July 25, 2013

White House Economics: Growing 'From The Middle Class Out'

President Obama is putting out a message of economic revitalization, starting with the middle class. Cecilia Munoz, Director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, explains why the executive branch is pushing the message now. She speaks with guest host Celeste Headleee.

Politics
3:27 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Another Senate Battle Looms Over Judicial Nominees

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 5:58 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

You could say another blockbuster battle is shaping up on Capitol Hill - over nominations. This one does not concern President Obama's executive branch appointments. That fight got settled at the 11th hour last week. This dispute is over judicial nominations, specifically over Obama's bid to fill three vacancies on the Washington, D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals. It's widely considered the nation's second most important court.

Yesterday, Republicans argued the court has enough judges already. NPR's David Welna reports.

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Politics
3:27 am
Thu July 25, 2013

8 Years Later, Obama Returns To Site Of Big Economic Speech

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 5:58 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene, good morning.

When president is in a second term, we often say that he's had his last campaign, at least as a candidate. For President Obama, this week is feeling in many ways like a campaign. He's trying to rally support for his ideas on the economy. The road trip began yesterday at Knox College in Illinois. Today he visits Jacksonville, Florida.

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National Security
5:03 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

House Rejects Measure That Would Have Curbed NSA Program

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 5:58 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

On Capitol Hill, an effort to limit the authority of the National Security Agency has fallen short. It was the first chance for House lawmakers to vote on the government's phone surveillance program since news of it was leaked by Edward Snowden. They rejected an amendment that the White House and top intelligence officials had lobbied hard against.

NPR's Tamara Keith joins us from Capitol Hill. And, Tamara, the amendment was defeated. How close was it?

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Politics
2:45 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Obama Speech Part Of Attempt To Refocus Economic Policy

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 5:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Joining us from the White House is Gene Sperling, director of the president's National Economic Council. Welcome to the program once again.

GENE SPERLING: Well, thank you for having us.

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Politics
2:45 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Obama Kicks Off Economic Speaking Tour In Illinois

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 5:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

President Obama went on the road today to reboot his economic agenda with a message that he called a better bargain for the middle class. He returned to Knox College in the small town of Galesburg, Illinois, to launch an economic speaking tour. Galesburg is where, eight years ago, the newly elected Senator Obama delivered his first big economic speech. And as NPR's Ari Shapiro reports, many of the themes haven't changed since then.

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Education
2:45 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Senate Passes Student Loan Legislation To Lower Interest Rates

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:31 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

After a long wait, the Senate has finally passed student loan legislation. It would restore lower interest rates for undergraduates. Many of them saw their rates double on July 1st when the Senate missed its deadline.

As NPR's Ailsa Chang reports, the new measure closely resembles both what the president wanted and what the House has already passed.

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Shots - Health News
2:19 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Obama Turns To Comedians To Promote Health Coverage

Comedian Sarah Silverman helped get out the vote for Obama in 2008 and 2012.
YouTube

Who needs jocks when you've got Jennifer Hudson and Amy Poehler?

That seems to be the message coming out of the White House following a star-studded meeting yesterday led by White House Senior Advisor Valerie Jarrett. Its mission: Figure out how to help promote the Affordable Care Act.

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The Two-Way
1:28 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Anthony Weiner Acknowledges More Inappropriate Messages

Anthony Weiner listens to a question from the media after courting voters outside a Harlem subway station in May.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 4:36 pm

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NPR Story
3:23 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Political Reporters Hit The (Bike) Trail In Iowa

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 5:37 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Okay. Political stories often come from the White House and they often take our political correspondents, say, to Iowa. That's where three of them are right now. But not for an election cycle, but actually to cycle. NPR's Don Gonyea, Scott Horsley and Brian Naylor are all on vacation together, pedaling across the state of Iowa, hundreds of miles with thousands of other cyclists. It's an annual summertime ritual known as RAGBRAI.

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NPR Story
3:23 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Republicans Pin Hopes On Senate Turnover In 2014

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 5:37 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Washington, D.C. the next election always seems just around the corner, even in the middle of summer when it seems a long way away to everyone else. Republicans are in the Senate minority today, but about now they're feeling confident about their prospects to pick up seats and maybe even regain the majority in 2014. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson reports.

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Politics
12:58 am
Tue July 23, 2013

How Floor Charts Became Stars Of Congress

http://senatecharts.tumblr.com/

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 9:26 am

Watch C-SPAN long enough, and you'll see members of Congress using visual aids: big, brightly colored poster boards, known on Capitol Hill as floor charts.

They've become an essential part of congressional messaging.

Almost every day the House of Representatives is in session, lawmakers line up to give what are known as one-minute speeches. Florida Democrat Frederica Wilson is always there.

And she always has her floor chart with her. It displays the number of days since Wilson came to Congress and the number of Americans unemployed.

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It's All Politics
5:23 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

McConnell's Challenge: Deal-Making Without Fingerprints

Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Senate minority leader, may have previewed his below-the-radar approach to future negotiations with Democrats during the recent filibuster fight.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 7:14 pm

It appears that it's just a matter of days before it becomes official that Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Senate's top Republican, will be forced into a primary by a Louisville businessman with Tea Party backing.

The news that Matthew Bevin, owner of a bell-manufacturing company and an investment company executive, intends to soon announce his effort to oust McConnell is interesting because it appears to place McConnell in something of a bind.

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Remembrances
11:58 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Remembering Helen Thomas: White House Trailblazer

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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