Politics

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Mark this down as the week the race for president begins in earnest.

Hillary Clinton's relaunch is a go. Jeb Bush is officially off the sidelines. And the crowded GOP field now includes 11 candidates, while Democrats have four hopefuls in the race.

Jeb Bush formally declared his candidacy for the White House on Monday.

"Our country is on a very bad course. And the question is: What are we going to do about it? The question for me is: What am I going to do about it? And I have decided — I am a candidate for president of the United States," Bush said during a rally at Miami Dade College's Kendall campus.

With that announcement, the former Florida governor becomes the 11th major Republican candidate seeking the party's presidential nomination.

A North Carolina law that would require women who want an abortion to have an ultrasound scan prior to the procedure suffered a final defeat Monday, when the Supreme Court refused to review the case. A federal judge declared the law illegal in early 2014.

The controversial law had been placed under an injunction soon after it took effect back in 2011. It was struck down on the grounds that it reflected ideological, rather than medical, priorities and violated doctors' right of free speech.

Richard Nixon's presidency has always been one surrounded by questions and controversy: Why did he wiretap his own aides and diplomats? Why did he escalate the war in Vietnam? Why did he lie about his war plans to his secretary of defense and secretary of state? What were the Watergate burglars searching for, and why did Nixon tape conversations that included incriminating evidence?

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This story is part of NPR's series Journey Home. We're going to the places presidential candidates call home and finding out what those places tell us about how they see the world.

There are three Republican candidates who ran Spanish-language ads when they announced their presidential intentions — but only one was an Anglo.

Major decisions are expected this month, as the U.S. Supreme Court works its way through several cases still pending before it closes out its calendar for the 2014-2015 term.

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Jeb Bush is set to announce his candidacy for president Monday. If he wins, he would be the third Bush to be president in the past 25 years. Jeb Bush has said he's his own man. Well, here are five things you should know about him.

1. Jeb Bush is not his real name

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Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

Hillary Clinton, in the first campaign speech for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, sounded a message of support for working families, calling for a new era of prosperity and pledging to support a constitutional amendment to overhaul campaign finance rules.

At a rally on New York's Roosevelt Island, she invoked the memory of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal, saying FDR brought "a wider and constantly rising standard of living" to all Americans, a promise, Clinton said, "that still sounds good to me."

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President Obama's own party dealt him a stinging rebuke when it rejected a key part of the fast-track trade promotion authority the White House wanted. Not even 11th-hour visits to both the Congressional Baseball Game Thursday night and to Capitol Hill Friday morning could cobble together enough support from his own party to advance the legislation. House Republicans say they will try again next week thanks to a procedural maneuver and the White House has dismissed it as a "snafu," but still it's something this president has spent a lot of political capital on.

The Obama administration is under growing pressure to change its policies governing the detention of thousands of migrants who came to the United States illegally.

Maybe it is a coincidence, but consider what has happened this past week:

Wisconsin Gov. Walker's Next Battle: Tenure

Jun 12, 2015

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has been making national headlines for years taking on public and private sector unions. Now, the possible GOP presidential candidate is going after another group — nearly 5,000 tenured faculty in the 26-campus University of Wisconsin system.

Tenure typically means that a university faculty member who has taught for a number years and passes a review process can't be easily fired. Tenure also translates often into a raise. For 12-month faculty at UW-Madison, the raise is about $8,000.

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For more on what this vote means and the week's politics, we turn to our regular Friday political commentators, E J Dionne of The Washington Post and the Brookings Institution. Hey there, E J.

E.J. DIONNE: Good to be with you.

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Is Hillary Clinton A Real New Yorker?

Jun 12, 2015

This story was produced by member station WNYC.

At the southern tip of Roosevelt Island, you're almost at the geographical center of New York City.

The United Nations, the midtown skyline, Brooklyn and Queens can all be seen. But the bulk of the island consists of strangely well-ordered, mid-rise, mid-century buildings. It's a place that doesn't feel much like New York at all — a perfect setting for Hillary Clinton to kick off her campaign for president. New York, but not.

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Hillary Clinton's campaign for president is about to enter a new phase. At her first big rally this Saturday in New York City, she will make an unusually personal speech about how her upbringing forged her commitment to helping others.

The first political operative to ever be found guilty of illegally coordinating between a superPAC and campaign was sentenced Friday to two years in prison and two additional years of probation.

"I did it, it was wrong when I did it, and I knew it was wrong when I did it," Tyler Harber admitted in federal court Friday.

A once important political event, which has seen its influence diminished by pay-to-play allegations, breathed its last breath Friday morning.

State Republicans voted to kill the Iowa Straw Poll in a unanimous vote — reversing themselves from a unanimous vote in January to continue it. Amid defections by key 2016 presidential candidates and despite pledged reforms, it was no longer able to survive.

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