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Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker will announce his long-expected campaign for president on Monday in Waukesha.

The Republican begins as the favorite in early primary state Iowa, a post he's kept since his rousing speech there in January. He benefits from being the neighboring governor and will look now to carve a path that goes beyond the Hawkeye State. He has vaulted into the top tier of GOP White House hopefuls and is a lock to make the debate stage next month.

The Affordable Care Act got a big boost from the Supreme Court in June. But some states are still dealing with fallout from a previous Supreme Court decision that left it up to states to decide whether or not to expand Medicaid.

In Florida, which opted not to expand, about 850,000 people were left in health care limbo that some call the coverage gap.

State by state, the legal marijuana business is slowly gaining ground. The industry is using both an increasingly favorable public opinion toward marijuana and a newly legal cash flow to try to transform itself into a force in national politics.

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Sen. Ted Cruz's campaign tome, A Time for Truth: Reigniting the Miracle of America, has sold 11,854 copies. That should have been enough to earn it the No. 2 slot on The New York Times Best Seller List for hardcover nonfiction. But, instead comedian Aziz Ansari's Modern Romance occupies that spot.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Thursday provided an unusual peek behind the scenes at how the court did its work this term.

Katherine Archuleta, the head of Office of Personnel Management who has been under fire since revelations that millions of people's personal data was compromised by hackers, is resigning.

Around midday Friday, Archuleta released a statement saying, "This morning, I offered, and the President accepted, my resignation."

Her last day on the job will be today. The role of acting director will be filled by Beth Cobert, a former director at consulting firm McKinsey & Company who has led the Obama administration's efforts to improve the OPM's efficiency.

Many ministers do their best to stay away from politics when they preach, but hundreds of conservative pastors around the country are so upset about what they see as a moral crisis in government that they are preparing to run for public office themselves, with the goal of bringing "biblical values" to the political arena.

The initiative is led by David Lane, a born-again Christian and self-described "political operative" who has organized four large-scale training sessions in which evangelical pastors are tutored in the practical aspects of running a political campaign.

Florida is a state with nearly a half million more registered Democrats than Republicans. You wouldn't know it, though, from the state's seats in Congress — 17 of the 27 congressional seats are held by Republicans.

A lot of factors play into that: the concentration of Democrats in urban areas, the talent Florida's Republican Party has for turning out its voters. But another factor is how the congressional district maps are drawn.

In a momentous ruling Thursday, Florida's Supreme Court has scrambled those maps just over a year before the next election.

These are palmy days for Sen. Bernie Sanders and his improbable campaign for president. Thousands throng his events in Maine, Iowa and Wisconsin. He has raised $15 million in just a few months, and he polls better among Democrats than any one Republican is polling among Republicans.

At a minimum, the "independent socialist" senator has established himself as the insurgent to watch among Democrats in this cycle. So, we should salute the man. But we should also cast a smiling glance toward the other, possibly ultimate, beneficiary of his early success.

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Long-time civil rights advocate Mary Frances Berry says while taking down this flag has symbolic power, much more needs to be done. And she joins us now from Washington, D.C. Welcome to the show.

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On the day when Nikki Haley, South Carolina's governor, proclaimed it "a new day in South Carolina" and signed into law the removal of the Confederate battle flag from Statehouse grounds, one Democratic presidential candidate sought to clarify his stance on the flag's place in American history.

Jim Webb, the former senator and current presidential candidate, provided a nuanced answer to whether he was glad to see the flag gone during an interview with CBS Thursday.

Updated at 5:55 p.m. ET

The Army confirmed Thursday that it will cut 40,000 troops at several domestic bases over the next two years in a cost-saving move. If the White House and Congress are unable to avert another round of sequestration cuts, the troop reductions could be even deeper, according to Army officials.

FBI Director James Comey said authorities have arrested "more than 10 people" over the past four weeks who have been radicalized through slick electronic recruitment efforts tied to the self-proclaimed Islamic state.

"We arrested them to try to thwart what they were up to," the FBI director said in a briefing with reporters Thursday in his Washington conference room.

"I do believe our work disrupted efforts to kill people, likely related to the Fourth of July," Comey added.

"Pics or it didn't happen" is a common refrain these days. You can't just experience life. You have to document it. And so, when fans line up to shake hands with a presidential candidate, that handshake often really isn't enough. It's all about the selfie — a self-portrait shot from a cellphone. And candidates are being deluged with selfie seekers on the trail.

Selfies are "a part of American culture" and, for candidates, taking them has to be part of a broader digital campaign strategy, said Brian Donahue, founder and CEO of Craft Media Digital, a political communications firm.

The Obama administration's nominee to become the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff warns that Russia is the biggest threat to American interests and describes Moscow's recent geopolitical moves as "nothing short of alarming."

Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford Jr., speaking at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee, said: "Russia presents the greatest threat to our national security. ... If you look at their behavior, it's nothing short of alarming."

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Today in South Carolina, Gov. Nikki Haley signed into law the bill that removes the Confederate battle flag from the Statehouse grounds.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Now we bring you the story of an investigation. Cue the "Magnum, P.I." music...

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MAGNUM, P.I. THEME")

MCEVERS: ...Because yes, this involves the famously mustachioed star of the '80s series, Tom Selleck.

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