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Montana's newly elected congressman pleaded guilty today to assaulting a journalist. The judge sentenced Republican Greg Gianforte to community service and anger management counseling. Montana Public Radio's Corin Cates-Carney reports from Bozeman.

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Can states force President Trump to sell off his businesses?

That question is being raised by a new legal challenge to Trump's continued ownership of far-flung businesses.

On Monday, the attorneys general for Maryland and the District of Columbia filed a lawsuit in a Maryland federal court, saying that Trump's failure to sell off his interests in hotels, golf courses, office buildings and other properties is undermining public trust and violating the U.S. Constitution's Emoluments Clause.

Every Friday morning when I was very little, the women who ran the daycare center I went to would gather all the kids into a circle and goodnaturedly quiz us on what happened the night before on The Cosby Show.

I distinctly remember the first time I sat in that circle having no idea what The Cosby Show was, feeling whatever pre-kindergarteners understand as shame. The center's staffers were all black, as were we, the assembled moppets. Watching the Huxtables was quite literally my first homework assignment.

Montana representative-elect Greg Gianforte pleaded guilty Monday to a charge of misdemeanor assault after body-slamming a reporter from The Guardian on the eve of Gianforte's election to the U.S. House.

He received a six-month deferred sentence and will serve no jail time.

Guardian reporter Ben Jacobs was asking Gianforte a question on May 24 when the Republican candidate threw him to the ground.

In more than 50 marches across the states, LGBT people and their allies gathered to stand in solidarity against the Trump administration over the weekend.

In Washington, D.C., people gathered in droves. Troy King, a 47-year-old gay man from Atlanta, marched to continue to pressure politicians to stand up for his community's rights.

"I'm not proud; I'm just gay," he said.

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For the second time this year, David, one very outspoken Russian dissident is calling for mass demonstrations.

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Yeah. It's Alexei Navalny. He has organized what he calls anti-corruption protests.

Gerry Realin says he wishes he had never become a police officer.

Realin, 37, was part of the hazmat team that responded to the Pulse Nightclub shooting in Orlando on June 12, 2016. He spent four hours taking care of the dead inside the club. Now, triggers like a Sharpie marker or a white sheet yank him out of the moment and back to the nightclub, where they used Sharpies to list the victims that night and white sheets to cover them.

D.C. Equality March Makes Pride Political

Jun 11, 2017

Pride parades are known for glitter, upbeat music and happy people dancing on bright floats, as they make their way through loud, colorful crowds.

This was not a pride parade.

"Stonewall began as a riot," Sian Lewis, a member of the D.C. planning committee for the Equality March, said, as "YMCA" by the Village People blared from large, black speakers behind her.

"We are living the legacy of Stonewall," she said.

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The Legal Landscape Of Leaks

Jun 11, 2017

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Sen. Ron Wyden On Comey And Jeff Sessions

Jun 11, 2017

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Not every congressional hearing is must see TV. But 19.5 million people tuned in to former FBI Director James Comey's testimony Thursday. And this morning, we're still trying to figure out what the dramatic few hours on Capitol Hill will mean for the White House.

Republicans in both the House and the Senate are considering big cuts to Medicaid. But those cuts endanger addiction treatment, which many people receive through the government health insurance program.

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And this is The Call-In. Today we're talking about refugees. And we wanted to hear your family stories.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Hi.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: Hi.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #2: Hello. My name is...

HEVAL KELLI: Heval Kelli.

President Donald Trump may not have the most Twitter followers on the platform but he is probably the most powerful person in the world who is tweeting on a regular basis. (Look no further than the recent "covfefe" incident and the raging wildfire of memes it incited.)

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A looming decision about whether to abolish or shrink the Bears Ears National Monument in Utah should provide an early signal of how the Trump administration will deal with a long list of public lands issues.

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We're joined now by U.S. Representative Terri Sewell of Alabama's 7th District. Representative Sewell, thanks very much for joining us here at the Lyric.

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It was either a really good week for President Trump or a hugely bad one. Former head of the FBI James Comey called him a liar in three hours of sworn testimony that was intense. And, Lordy, it was even folksy at times.

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Can you stand any more politics? We're joined now by Jim Zeigler He's the state auditor of Alabama and considered a leader of the Republican Party in this state. Mr. Auditor - Mr. Zeigler thanks so much for being with us.

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(Laughter). We're joined onstage now by our very own Debbie Elliott, NPR's Southern correspondent...

DEBBIE ELLIOTT, BYLINE: Hello.

SIMON: ...And John Archibald is a columnist here at al.com.

JOHN ARCHIBALD: Hey.

(APPLAUSE)

What's Ahead In U.K. Politics

Jun 10, 2017

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One of the biggest political gambles in British history has apparently failed. British Prime Minister Theresa May has formed a new minority government after she failed to win a majority in this week's general election.

Colstrip, Mont., is about 750 miles away from Seattle, as the crow flies. Politically, the two places may be even further apart. And yet, they're connected.

If you're turning the lights on in the Pacific Northwest, some of that electricity may be coming from Colstrip. And if you're in Colstrip, wondering how long your own lights will stay on, you're likely looking west.

All we want are the facts, ma'am.

During his congressional testimony Thursday, James Comey played his best Sgt. Joe Friday, the protagonist of the 1950s Dragnet TV series known for that signature line.

Asked whether he thought President Trump obstructed justice, Comey, the fired FBI director, declined to give his opinion.

"I don't know," Comey said. "That — that's Bob Mueller's job to sort that out."

Saturday's nationwide "March Against Sharia," sponsored by a group known for aggressively criticizing Islam, has in recent days become a rallying cause for right-wing extremists, forcing march organizers to repudiate some of their own supporters and prompting concern about clashes with militant leftists.

A nonprofit group's claim that President Trump is violating the Emoluments Clause of the U.S. Constitution should be dismissed because the plaintiffs have no standing to sue, according to a court filing by the Department of Justice.

"Those claims falter on threshold grounds: no Plaintiff has alleged an injury" that meets the standing requirement, the DOJ says in a document submitted in federal court.

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