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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

No other major party presidential candidate has ever made it through primary season financing a campaign the way Bernie Sanders has. The Vermont senator and self-described Democratic socialist did not throw swanky receptions to court donors who could write $2,700 checks, the limit allowed by law. Nor did Sanders encourage wealthy friends to launch a superPAC funded with unlimited contributions.

Instead, he relied on donors who gave small amounts online, over and over.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It was 12:18 p.m. ET when President Obama began his remarks after meeting with his National Security Council about efforts to combat ISIS. Four minutes later, his former secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, began speaking at a union hall in Pittsburgh.

In an abrupt shift in message, Donald Trump indicated Wednesday that he might be taking on a Republican tenet: the party's long-standing opposition to gun control.

Trump said he would talk to the NRA about not allowing "people on the terrorist watch list, or the no fly list, to buy guns." In typical fashion for the presumptive Republican nominee, the announcement came via Twitter:

The NRA, for its part, says there's no conflict:

In a statement, the NRA said it would be "happy to meet with Donald Trump." But that:

Three days ahead of California's Democratic presidential primary, Bernie Sanders made several appearances in Southern California before headlining a rally in San Diego.

There was a Sunday morning walk through a farmers market in Downtown Los Angeles. There was a walk through West Hollywood, LA's gayborhood, with a pre-drag brunch address to diners at a hamburger joint on Santa Monica Boulevard. That was followed by a stroll through Santa Monica Pier, where the candidate rode a merry-go-round and even interrupted an outdoor spin class fundraiser to give an impromptu stump speech.

This week, as part of the Nation Engaged project, NPR and some member stations will be talking about what the 2016 primary season has revealed about voters' confidence in the American electoral system.

Voters unhappy with the political system this year and unsure about whether their vote matters have big complaints how the country's two main political parties choose their candidates.

It's no secret that Donald Trump has struggled to win over female voters. Polls show more than 60 percent of women have an unfavorable opinion of the presumptive Republican nominee.

But, as the campaign pivots to the general election, are Republican women reconsidering Trump? It's this group of largely white women Trump needs in November.

Virginia Rep. Randy Forbes is now the third incumbent to lose in a primary this year, the victim of mid-decade congressional redistricting.

The seven-term Republican congressman saw his GOP-leaning district become heavily Democratic after a federal court ordered new lines drawn. Faced with a near-certain general election loss, Forbes decided instead to run in the neighboring 2nd District, where GOP Rep. Scott Rigell was retiring.

Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders met Tuesday evening to try to start healing wounds from their long, bitter primary battle.

The summit between the two came the same night Clinton won the final contest of the cycle, easily notching a 57-point victory over Sanders in the District of Columbia's Democratic primary.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Updated at 8:55 p.m. ET.

He called it yapping, loose talk, and sloppiness. President Obama dismissed criticism of his administration's avoidance of the term "radical Islam" and urged America to live up to its founding values Tuesday, speaking at length about inclusiveness and religious freedom.

This post was updated at 3:10 PM

Russian hackers have been accessing the Democratic National Committee's computer network for the past year, and have stolen information including opposition research files on presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

According to CrowdStrike, the security firm the DNC called in to deal with the massive data breach, one group of hackers tied to the Russian government has been stealing information from the national party for about a year.

The Orlando shooter, Omar Mateen, claimed allegiance to the leader of the Islamic State during a phone call to 911 early Sunday. And that's reignited a debate over how to label the ideology that apparently inspired the attack.

Republican Donald Trump and many on the right say it's "radical Islam." But Democrat Hillary Clinton used a different term: "radical Islamism." It's not just a debate over semantics.

House Speaker Paul Ryan may still be backing the candidacy of presumptive GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump, but the two top-tier Republicans continue to butt heads over Trump's call for a temporary ban on Muslim immigration into the United States.

Tuesday is Donald Trump's 70th birthday. If he wins the election in November, that means he would be the oldest newly elected president in U.S. history, putting him ahead of Ronald Reagan, who was just shy of 70 on Inauguration Day 1981.

If Hillary Clinton were elected, she wouldn't be far behind. She will turn 69 in October. Come Inauguration Day 2017, that would put her not far behind Reagan when he was inaugurated, making her the second-oldest president.

Here's how those two candidates compare with America's past presidents:

The reach of Bernie Sanders' political influence will be tested Tuesday in a Nevada congressional race.

Lucy Flores was among the presidential candidate's first endorsements earlier this year, and his blessing and subsequent fundraising plea helped the former state legislator raise over $600,000 for her competitive Democratic primary.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This week, as part of the Nation Engaged project, NPR and some member stations will be talking about what the 2016 primary season has revealed about voters' confidence in the American electoral system.

This year's primaries have been filled with complaints about the voting process. Voters in Arizona were furious that they had to wait up to five hours to cast ballots. Thousands of New Yorkers had their names mistakenly dropped from voter registration rolls.

Americans were still waking up to the worst mass shooting in U.S. history Sunday when Donald Trump popped up on Twitter, boasting about his call to ban Muslims from entering the U.S. and calling on President Obama to resign.

He tweeted: "Is President Obama going to finally mention the words radical Islamic terrorism? If he doesn't he should immediately resign in disgrace!"

"In his remarks today," Trump said later Sunday in a statement, "President Obama disgracefully refused to even say the words 'Radical Islam.' For that reason alone, he should step down."

The NPR Politics team discusses Sunday's mass shooting at the Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, Fla. It is the most deadly shooting in modern American history, leaving 49 people dead and more injured. They also talk about the stark contrast in reactions from presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

On the podcast:

  • Campaign Reporter Scott Detrow
  • Editor and Correspondent Ron Elving
  • National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson

Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump announced Monday he was revoking press credentials for The Washington Post, upset with the major newspaper's coverage of his campaign.

The action from the Trump campaign is the latest in a string of moves Trump's campaign has made to ban reporters and news outlets that, in the mind of the billionaire businessman, have not treated him fairly.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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