Politics

Politics
2:44 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Cheney Sisters' Split Over Gay Marriage Plays Out On TV, Online

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 4:27 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. The debate over same-sex marriage is at a furious boil right now inside one famous political family. Liz and Mary Cheney, the daughters of former Vice President Dick Cheney, find themselves on opposite sides of the issue. Mary is gay and married. Liz, her older sister, is running for Senate in Wyoming and she has said she opposes same-sex marriage.

She was asked about that yesterday on Fox News Sunday.

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Middle East
2:44 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Selling Iran Deal To Congress, Kerry Downplays Israeli Criticism

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 7:02 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. This could be a big week for diplomacy with Iran. The U.S. and other world powers are sending diplomats back to Geneva. They're hoping to persuade Iran to roll back some of its nuclear program, in exchange for limited sanctions relief. One key U.S. ally is not happy about that. Israel calls it a bad deal, and is urging the U.S. to stand tough.

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It's All Politics
1:47 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

How Would Your City Handle A Mayor Like Rob Ford?

Mayor Rob Ford talks during a City Council debate in Toronto on Nov. 13.
Nathan Denette AP

If an American city had a mayor as embarrassing as Rob Ford of Toronto, whose problems with drugs and alcohol have caused an international sensation, it could get rid of him.

Probably.

Recalls of local elected officials have become more common in the U.S. over the past few years.

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It's All Politics
11:38 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Gay-Marriage Remarks Spark Cheney Family Feud

Liz Cheney campaigns in Casper, Wyo., after announcing her U.S. Senate bid in July. Her views on same-sex marriage have recently taken center stage.
Matt Young AP

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 12:55 pm

A family feud between Liz and Mary Cheney, the daughters of former Vice President Dick Cheney, played out in awkward fashion Sunday.

Liz Cheney, who is running for Wyoming's U.S. Senate seat, sparked the dispute on Fox News Sunday, saying she "believe[s] in the traditional definition of marriage" even though her sister, Mary, a lesbian, is married to a woman.

"I love Mary very much. I love her family very much. This is just an issue on which we disagree," Cheney told host Chris Wallace.

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It's All Politics
6:46 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Monday Political Mix: Bitcoins In Congress' Spotlight

Bitcoins have gone from an Internet oddity to much more and Congress wants to understand them and other virtual currencies better.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 7:15 am

Good morning, fellow political junkies.

This week contains major anniversaries of events that involved the first and last presidents killed in office, a tragic link captured in a famous newspaper editorial cartoon. Friday is the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy's assassination, Tuesday is the 150th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address.

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It's All Politics
6:30 am
Mon November 18, 2013

More Blame Congress Than Obama For Park Woes During Shutdown

U.S. Park Ranger Mirta Maltes stands near the road-closed sign leading to the Everglades National Park on Oct. 7 in Miami.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 8:17 am

It may seem like a distant memory, but the images are indelible: grizzled veterans tearing down barricades at the National World War II Memorial; armed rangers blocking national park entrance roads with massive signs and government SUVs; and county officials in Utah

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It's All Politics
1:25 am
Mon November 18, 2013

States Aim To Cure Hyperpartisanship With Primary Changes

To fight hyperpartisanship and redistricting aimed at keeping politicians safe in their district, some states are experimenting with new primary voting systems.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 3:42 pm

Several states are trying to do something about so-called hyperpartisanship by changing the way congressional districts are drawn and the way elections are held.

Their goal: force members of Congress to pay more attention to general election voters than to their base voters on the right or left.

John Fortier, the director of the Democracy Project at the Bipartisan Policy Center, which is working on ways to make politics less dysfunctional, says U.S. political parties have become more polarized.

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Politics
1:24 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Obama Shifts To Foreign Policy Goals During Second Term

A breakthrough on Iran's nuclear program could shape history's view of President Obama.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 1:10 pm

The White House has been fighting to prevent the disastrous rollout of the health care law from defining President Obama's second term. While that struggle continues, another story is unfolding this week that could shape this president's legacy.

Diplomats from the U.S. and other countries are going to meet for a second round of negotiations on Iran's nuclear program, and a breakthrough there could shape history's view of Obama.

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The Salt
9:29 am
Sun November 17, 2013

See How Food Stamp Cuts Are Hitting Across The U.S.

Screen grab of a map that shows hard numbers about who's getting hit by food stamp cuts.
Stateline

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 2:20 pm

When you think of Oregon and food, you probably think organic chicken, kale chips and other signs of a strong local food movement. What probably doesn't come to mind? Food stamps.

And yet, 21 percent of Oregon's population – that's one out of every five residents – relies on food stamps to get by. And like many people across the country, these Oregon families who have come to rely on federal food assistance program for meals are learning to make do with less as of this month.

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Politics
4:35 am
Sun November 17, 2013

Obama's Bad Week

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 9:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

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The Kennedy Assassination, 50 Years Later
3:34 am
Sun November 17, 2013

Listening In: Cronkite, Lady Bird On The Death Of A President

CBS newscaster Walter Cronkite announces the death of President John F. Kennedy.
CBS/Landov

The image of Walter Cronkite taking off his glasses as he announced President John F. Kennedy's death on Nov. 22, 1963, is one that seems seared into our collective memory — even for those of us who weren't around to see it live.

Nearly 40 years later, Cronkite revisited that moment and the rest of that unsettling day in a piece that aired on All Things Considered on Nov. 22, 2002.

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It's All Politics
3:22 am
Sun November 17, 2013

How Texas Changed, And Changed The Nation, Since JFK

The presidential motorcade travels down Main Street in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, the day President John F. Kennedy was shot.
Cecil Stoughton UPI /Landov

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 10:57 am

Texas wasn't exactly a backwater in 1963 when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, but it wasn't the economic and political powerhouse that it has become today.

Over the past 50 years, three of the nation's presidents have hailed from Texas.

"For the past few decades, Texas politicians have found a natural habitat on the national political stage in the way Dominican shortstops have found a natural habitat in baseball," the humorist Calvin Trillin wrote a couple of years ago.

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The New And The Next
3:29 pm
Sat November 16, 2013

Making Moves In Food Delivery, Chess And Health Care

Courtesy of Ozy.com

Originally published on Sat December 7, 2013 1:29 pm

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History
5:45 am
Sat November 16, 2013

How JFK Fathered The Modern Presidential Campaign

John F. Kennedy and his wife, Jacqueline Kennedy, campaign in New York in 1960.
AP

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 1:33 pm

When John F. Kennedy began his run for the White House more than 50 years ago, there was plenty of excitement and anticipation. He was energetic, handsome and from a famous Boston political family.

But his candidacy was far from a sure bet. At the time, few would have predicted the lasting impact his campaign would have on every election to follow.

Recognizing The Power Of TV

Kennedy made the most of his youth and novelty, says historian Robert Dallek, author of several books about JFK.

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Politics
5:30 am
Sat November 16, 2013

How Obama Changed His Health Care Law

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

DON GONYEA, HOST:

Not all the action surrounding the health law took place on Capitol Hill this week. Yesterday's vote was just the last of several significant events in the ever-evolving saga that is the Affordable Care Act. NPR's Julie Rovner covers health policy, which these days means pretty much covering the federal health law full time. She joins us in the studio now. Hi, Julie.

JULIE ROVNER, BYLINE: Hey, Don.

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Politics
5:30 am
Sat November 16, 2013

With Democrats' Help, House Votes Against Obamacare

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

DON GONYEA, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. Scott Simon is away. I'm Don Gonyea. The Affordable Care Act dominated political headlines again this week. Yesterday, the House passed a Republican bill that would allow insurance companies to renew individual health insurance policies even if the coverage does not provide all the benefits required by the new health care law.

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Opinion
5:30 am
Sat November 16, 2013

2016 Polling Comes Too Soon For This Political Reporter

Supporters may be "Ready for Hillary," but NPR political reporter Don Gonyea isn't.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 4:43 pm

The email landed in my inbox at 7:01 Tuesday morning.

The subject line read, "NBC News Poll: Christie Trails Clinton In Hypothetical 2016 Match-Up, Faces Divided GOP."

My reaction when I got this breaking news with my first cup of coffee? A big, nonverbal, heavy sigh.

The headline correctly states that this is a "hypothetical" matchup. Oh, and if you are fan of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie — not to worry. A different poll came out this week as well. That one has him leading Hillary Clinton 43-42. Within the margin of error, of course.

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Energy
4:05 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Is Running Your Car On Rubbish The Future Of Fuels?

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 6:07 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The Environmental Protection Agency today proposed to scale back the amount of renewable fuels in our nation's gasoline supply, biofuels like ethanol made from corn. The EPA is responding, in part, to oil companies that say they're already taking as much ethanol as they can. They say any more and it will hurt quality. But there's another reason for the EPA's action. As NPR's Elizabeth Shogren reports, cheap biofuels haven't been developed as quickly as hoped.

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Politics
4:04 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Week In Politics: The Affordable Care Act And Iran Nuclear Talks

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 6:07 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And we pick up there with our Friday regulars, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and the Brookings Institution, and David Brooks with the New York Times.

DAVID BROOKS: Hello.

E.J. DIONNE: Good to be with you.

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Health Care
3:58 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

What Makes A Health Plan Obamacare-Compliant?

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 6:07 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

We've been hearing a lot about health insurance policies that were canceled because they don't comply with the Affordable Health Care Act. That is, in some way, those policies don't meet the standards that the ACA set. And we were wondering in what way these policies typically fall short. And joining us to try to answer that question is Karen Pollitz, senior fellow at the Kaiser Family Foundation. Welcome to the program.

KAREN POLLITZ: Thank you.

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Politics
3:56 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

House Approves 'Keep Your Health Plan' Bill

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 6:07 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

We begin this hour on Capitol Hill, where a vote in the House has capped a week of controversy over the Affordable Care Act. The president apologized. His party squirmed. And more than three dozen Democrats joined House Republicans today to pass a bill that would let insurers continue existing policies for a year. That's even if plans don't meet standards set by the health care law. NPR's Ailsa Chang reports.

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It's All Politics
3:54 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Obama And Health Insurers Eye Each Other Warily

President Obama makes a statement in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on Friday, before the start of a meeting with representatives of health insurance companies. The president said he brought health insurance CEOs to the White House to brainstorm ways to make sure Americans know what their coverage options are under the law.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 6:14 pm

In "The Defiant Ones," a classic film directed by Stanley Kramer, two escapees from a Southern chain gang hated each other but were handcuffed together, meaning they could survive only by working together.

Which is pretty much a metaphor for where President Obama and insurance company executives have found themselves all along with the Affordable Care Act.

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It's All Politics
3:37 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

GOP Candidates Split Over Obamacare In Louisiana Race

State Sen. Neil Riser (left) and Vance McAllister are pictured in images provided by their campaigns. The two Republicans are running against each other in a Louisiana congressional special election.
AP

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 6:58 pm

There's a House special election Saturday, but almost no one outside Louisiana has noticed.

Here's why: The race in the state's safely Republican 5th Congressional District will have no impact on the balance of power in Congress.

There's also very little separation between state Sen. Neil Riser and businessman Vance McAllister, the Republicans who are battling to replace GOP Rep. Rodney Alexander, on the major issues.

But there's one notable difference between the candidates that makes the contest worth watching — their stances on Obamacare.

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It's All Politics
12:29 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Tails Never Fails: Coin Toss Decides Idaho Mayor's Race

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 4:27 pm

Heads or tails?

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All Tech Considered
10:34 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Internal Emails Reveal Warnings HealthCare.gov Wasn't Ready

Henry Chao, the project manager of HealthCare.gov, is sworn in to testify before the House Oversight Committee on Wednesday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 2:42 pm

HealthCare.gov could barely function on the day the health insurance marketplace debuted, and internal emails show at least some top health officials could see the failure coming.

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Barbershop
10:14 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Can President Obama Get Back In The Game After Health Care 'Fumble'?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barbershop where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds. Sitting in the chairs for a shape-up this week are writer Jimi Izrael, with us from Cleveland. From Boston, health care consultant and contributor to National Review magazine, Neil Minkoff. Here in Washington, Paul Butler, professor of law at Georgetown University. And Corey Dade, contributing editor for The Root. Take it away, Jimi.

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The Two-Way
9:39 am
Fri November 15, 2013

House Approves 'Keep Your Health Plan' Legislation

The House votes Friday on a bill submitted by GOP Rep. Fred Upton of Michigan, shown with Speaker John Boehner, that seeks to ensure Americans can keep their existing insurance plans even if those policies don't meet standards in the Affordable Care Act.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 5:29 pm

The House has approved a Republican-sponsored bill that would allow insurance companies to continue offering policies that would be canceled because they don't meet the standards of the Affordable Care Act. The Keep Your Health Plan Act, H.R. 3350, was adopted by a vote of 261-157, with 17 members not voting.

We've updated the top of this post with the results of the vote and other news.

Update at 7:30 p.m. ET: States Reportedly Confused By Obamacare Fix

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It's All Politics
7:37 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Friday Political Mix: Obama's Health Care Fallout Writ Large

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 10:07 am

Good morning.

Or, bad morning, if you're President Obama and absorbing the profound political reality of the botched health care law rollout, and your attempt at a fix.

We'll let the headlines tell the story:

Wall Street Journal: "Obama Retreats on Health Care Rules"

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It's All Politics
5:03 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Polls Reveal Season Of Record-Breaking Voter Anger

A recent poll reported that the approval rating for Congress is at a record low.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 12:21 pm

The American public is clearly ticked off. Between the government shutdown, the troubled rollout of the Affordable Care Act, and the pace of the economic recovery, poll after poll reports signs of deep frustration and unrest.

Anger toward politicians and government isn't exactly a new phenomenon. What is unusual, however, is the sheer number of polling records that have been set in recent weeks — both lows and highs.

Here's a sampling:

Congressional Approval Rating

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Politics
2:50 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Obama Apologizes, Offers Fix To Insurance Cancellations

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 8:49 am

President Obama has acknowledged the fumbled rollout of his signature health care law has hurt his credibility and that of fellow Democrats. He offered a minor change to the law in hopes of calming Democratic nerves, and beating back bigger changes proposed by House Republicans.

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