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While many pundits and political observers were quick to praise Hillary Clinton's pick of Tim Kaine as her running mate on Friday, the choice wasn't met with universal acclaim.

One important group — progressives and backers of Clinton's former rival, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders — were not as pleased with the selection of the Virginia senator who has cultivated a reputation of working across the aisle over the course of his political career.

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Tim Kaine is boring. Just ask him.

"I am boring," the man Hillary Clinton picked on Friday night to be her running mate said last month on NBC's "Meet The Press."

The Virginia senator tried to play it off with something of a dad joke: "But boring is the fastest-growing demographic in this country," he laughed.

So why would Clinton pick "boring" to be her vice president? (And it's not because there are suddenly loads of more boring people out there voting as a bloc.)

Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine is Hillary Clinton's choice for her vice president, giving her a running mate with experience at all levels of government to round out the Democratic ticket.

Clinton told supporters the news in a text message and a tweet on Friday evening just after 8 p.m. ET. According to a Clinton campaign official, the former secretary of state called Kaine this evening to make the formal offer.

5 Things To Know About Tim Kaine

Jul 22, 2016

After weeks of speculation, Hillary Clinton's campaign has announced she will tap Tim Kaine as her running mate.

The Virginia Supreme Court has ruled that Gov. Terry McAuliffe doesn't have the authority for a blanket restoration of voting rights to the state's felons.

McAuliffe had issued a sweeping executive order in April that affected 206,000 ex-offenders in the state.

In a 4-3 ruling, the state's justices said under the state constitution, McAuliffe didn't have the authority for such a proclamation.

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It's not often — if ever — that presidential nominees use footnotes in their acceptance speeches.

But last night, Donald Trump used 282 of them in the written version of his acceptance speech — to bolster what he promised would be a presentation of the "facts plainly and honestly." I was footnote number 145.

Trump told the Republican audience that if they wanted to hear "the corporate spin, the carefully-crafted lies and the media myths" they should go to the Democratic convention.

A national convention aims to offer a space for a political party to unify — to hone its message, set aside internal divisions and move forward toward a shared adversary. As Republicans sweep up confetti and try to forget the Ted Cruz-Donald Trump flame war, Democrats pack their bags for Philadelphia, hoping to unite their own badly split party.

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In a press conference that was supposed to serve as a victory lap after the Republican National Convention, Donald Trump went on the offensive against Texas Sen. Ted Cruz.

Trump said that even if Cruz offered an endorsement he would not take it. "I don't want his endorsement," Trump said. "If he gives it, I won't accept it, just so you understand."

Trump also made referred once again to a conspiracy theory linking Cruz's father to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

During our time covering the Republican National Convention in Cleveland this week, we asked pretty much everyone we met why they were supporting Donald Trump.

Here are some of their answers:

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It has been said that "to cleave" is the only verb in English that connotes one specific action and its direct opposite. To cleave sometimes means to hold together, and it can also mean to split apart.

That's why Cleveland was the perfect city to host the 2016 Republican National Convention. Because this week, in this town, the GOP demonstrated both its persistent divisions and its instinct for overcoming them.

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Donald Trump accepted the Republican nomination for president Thursday night, delivering a speech that lays out America's struggles with crime, terrorism and immigration and how he plans to address them.

NPR's politics team has annotated Trump's speech below. Portions we commented on are highlighted, followed by analysis, context and fact check in italics.


Thank you, thank you. Thank you very much.

Friends, delegates and fellow Americans: I humbly and gratefully accept your nomination for the presidency of the United States.

In an apparent first, a Republican convention speaker on Thursday took the stage during the final, most high-profile night, just minutes before the nominee himself, and uttered these words: "I am proud to be gay."

With two outsize white bows in her hair, 6-year-old Heavenly Joy brought the house down at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland Thursday night. She sang two songs to open the night — "Let There Be Peace On Earth" and "America the Beautiful."

Watch it here via C-SPAN.

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