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Sometimes it takes a Sunday morning to see how much damage was done Saturday night.

So it was this weekend, in New Hampshire and in the broader national conversation about the 2016 presidential race.

On Saturday night, many observers seized on the meatiest moment from the GOP debate staged here — perhaps the most salient moment of all the debates so far. It was the clash between Chris Christie and Marco Rubio that turned into a stunning exposé of Rubio's technique.

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Everyone knows the GOP is the party of small government and low taxes. At Saturday night's debate, the 2016 Republican presidential candidates sparred over who had the best fiscal conservatism cred.

We decided to look at how well candidates told the truth on a few of these claims in our latest debate fact check.

"After New Jersey raised taxes on millionaires, we lost, in the next four years, $70 billion in wealth [that] left our state." — New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie

It's not that simple.

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Primary season has officially begun. And as the presidential candidates campaign ahead of Tuesday's New Hampshire primary, both Republicans and Democrats are making big arguments in response to some big questions about their party's future.

Is there such a thing as an "establishment lane" that can win the GOP contest? Can a Democrat be both moderate and a progressive? Is it better to be pragmatic or idealistic?

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In New Hampshire, Bernie Sanders looks poised to beat Hilary Clinton in this Tuesday's primary. NPR's Tamara Keith reports you can tell the candidates' place in the race by how they are campaigning.

TV Ad-Spending Bonanza Revs Up In New Hampshire

Feb 7, 2016
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The Republican presidential candidates met tonight in Manchester, N.H. for the final debate before the first-in-the-nation primary on Tuesday, February 9.

Unlike the last Republican debate, Donald Trump, who came in second in the Iowa caucuses, decided to participate. He joined the winner of the Iowa caucuses, Ted Cruz, as well as Marco Rubio, who came in third. Trump and Rubio were only separated by one percentage point in the caucuses.

Saturday's GOP debate was the final one before Tuesday's New Hampshire primary. Here were five key moments:


1. That awkward start

One key thing has to happen before the debate starts: the candidates have to take the stage.

That proved more complicated than usual on Saturday night, as the ABC News Republican debate began with Ben Carson refusing to walk out to his podium, even after the moderators called his name.

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GOP Debate Preview

Feb 6, 2016
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Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has said he is a different kind of candidate running a different kind of campaign. He doesn't have a SuperPAC and he doesn't want one. One of the things his supporters say they like about him is Sanders isn't a typical politician.

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Do Political TV Ads Still Work?

Feb 6, 2016
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One more twist in an already unusual campaign season - the candidate on the Republican side who spent the most money on TV ads by far is lagging far behind in the polls. The two candidates who did best in Iowa hardly spent anything compared to years past.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders both pledged their allegiance Thursday to the cause of campaign finance reform during the final Democratic presidential debate before the New Hampshire primary.

Polls show that many Americans agree: Too much money comes from too few donors. The candidates' solutions, predictably, were somewhat less certain.

SuperPACs

When seven of the nine remaining Republican candidates meet Saturday for their final debate before the New Hampshire primary on Tuesday, several of them will be facing their last chance to stay in the race.

Here are three things to watch for at 8 p.m. ET when Jeb Bush, Ben Carson, Chris Christie, Ted Cruz, John Kasich, Marco Rubio and Donald Trump appear on stage at the ABC News debate in Manchester, N.H.

Which Donald Trump will show up?

Now is the time to pick up a Pataki for President bumper sticker. Or a Huckabee button, a Jim Webb yard sign, or keychains, ballpoint pens, and window scrapers imprinted Jindal, Paul, Perry, Chafee, Walker, Graham, Santorum, Lessig, and O'Malley for President.

It's already a kind of autumn in the cycle of a presidential campaign, in which candidacies have a last burst of color and fall to the ground.

As the U.S. presidential campaign moves into primary season, America's allies and rivals are starting to pay a lot closer attention to the candidates. That includes Russia, whose relations with the U.S. are at their lowest levels since the Cold War.

So here's a look at the U.S. campaign through the eyes of a couple of Kremlin-friendly analysts:

First of all, do Russians see the current elections as a possibility for improving relations?

You could think of this week's meme as the Rorschach test of the Democratic base. Depending on who you ask, it's either light-hearted and fun, or a symbol of gender bias and discrimination.

With the Iowa caucuses in the books, the focus of the political world has shifted to the first-in-the-nation-primary state, New Hampshire. New Hampshire voters, with their contrarian reputation, head to the polls Tuesday. Expect the unexpected.

Here are five things to know about how it all works:

1. Voting is straightforward

Time for the second installment in my playlists for the 2016 election. This time: New Hampshire.

We've already brought you tunes to keep a roving political reporter sane while logging miles in a rental car in Iowa.

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