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Linda Brown Thompson of Brown v. Board of Education died this week. In 1954, the decision was supposed to desegregate schools. Now, 64 years later, NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Georgetown University law professor Sheryll Cashin about the effects.

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All 22 women in the Senate are calling for their fellow lawmakers to do something about sexual harassment.

In a letter written to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., the 17 Democrats and five Republican senators ask that their chamber take up legislation to overhaul the sexual harassment complaint process on Capitol Hill.

Following a string of GOP losses in special elections nationwide, Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott Walker is locked in a battle with prominent Democrats over Walker's refusal to call elections for two vacant state legislative districts.

Walker faces a court-ordered deadline of Thursday to call elections for the seats, which opened in December when the officeholders resigned to take jobs in the governor's administration.

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Updated at 5:30 p.m. ET

The Supreme Court justices seemed to grasp the problem of gerrymandering in oral arguments on Wednesday and that it will only get worse, as computer-assisted redistricting gets even more refined.

But they appeared frustrated over what to do about it — without becoming the constant police officer on the beat.

This case, involving a Democratic-drawn congressional district in Maryland, is essentially Act II of the gerrymandering play at the Supreme Court.

Trump's Alleged Affairs And GOP Voters

Mar 28, 2018

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Mary Wilson raised just under $40,000 for her Texas congressional campaign. One of her opponents, Joseph Kopser, raised $774,000, but she came in first in the Democratic primary for the 21st Congressional District near Austin and San Antonio.

Not only did she outdo Kopser, whom she will face in a May runoff, but Wilson also defeated two other men who had much larger campaign war chests than she did.

It just so happens that Wilson did all this in a year when female candidates have energized Democratic voters. So did being a woman help Wilson?

She says yes.

It looks like one of the marquee cases before the U.S. Supreme Court is about to go bust — sabotaged by a needle in a legislative haystack.

The question in the case is whether a U.S. technology company can refuse to honor a court-ordered U.S. search warrant seeking information that is stored at a facility outside the United States.

Oral arguments took place at the Supreme Court last month, and they did not go well for Microsoft, the tech giant that is challenging a warrant for information stored at its facility in Ireland.

Updated on March 28 at 12:30 p.m.

After a controversial decision by the Department of Commerce to add a question about U.S. citizenship to the 2020 census, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders defended the move as nothing out of the ordinary.

The claim

"This is a question that's been included in every census since 1965," Sanders said Tuesday, "with the exception of 2010, when it was removed."

The 2020 Census is shaping up to be a major political fight.

California is suing the Trump administration over an addition to the survey that asks about respondents’ citizenship. The state’s attorney general argues that the Census is for anyone living in the U.S., regardless of citizenship.

How will the fight affect the Census, and the new districts drawn based on the results?

A Former President, A Person Of Faith

Mar 27, 2018

Religion has been part of former President Jimmy Carter’s routine since he was a child. He writes in his new book, “Faith: A Journey For All”:

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The Facebook scandal over misuse of user information has reached a Canadian data analytics company. And a whistleblower says he believes the firm, which has ties to the Trump presidential campaign, may have swayed the U.K.'s 2016 Brexit vote.

Updated at 9:10 a.m. ET Wednesday

The future of Uber's self-driving car program is likely non-existent in California, at least for now.

The company announced it will not renew Uber's permit through the state's Department of Motor Vehicles to continue testing a fleet of autonomous-driving cars on California roads, following last week's deadly crash in Tempe, Ariz.

The Community Relations Service was born out of one of the most contentious periods in American history — the civil rights movement of the 1960s.

The Justice Department peacemaking office established by the 1964 Civil Rights Act has provided communities dealing with racial or other tensions with professional mediators and other confidential services to help resolve conflict.

Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, responding to this past weekend's March For Our Lives events across the nation, is proposing what some might call a radical solution to prevent further gun violence — repealing the Second Amendment.

The National Rifle Association acknowledged that it accepts foreign donations but says it does not use them for election work — even as federal investigators look into the role the NRA might have played in Russia's attack on the 2016 election.

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Dozens of Russian intelligence officers now have less than a week to leave the country. The White House has told 60 Russian diplomats to get out.

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The massive spending bill President Trump signed into law on Friday includes enough money to replace voting machines that leave no paper trail, a top priority for many election officials and cybersecurity experts. But according to a new analysis, it seems unlikely that's how the money will be spent.

Updated 2:30 a.m. ET Tuesday

The U.S. Commerce Department announced late Monday that it will restore a question about citizenship to the 2020 census questionnaire.

In an eight-page memo Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross says the Justice Department has requested that the census ask who is a citizen in order to help determine possible violations of the Voting Rights Act, to help enforce that law.

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