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Tomorrow, Wisconsin's primary is poised to do something it has not done in more than 30 years. It is about to deal a blow to a presidential front-runner.

Still more amazing is the fact the state's primary voters are expected to throw some shade on both the Democratic and Republican front-runners, an unimaginable result in the long era since World War II.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Friday brought a pretty strong March jobs report. Labor force participation (that is, the share of Americans working or looking for work) picked up, and wages were solid — two areas that haven't always been confidence inspiring in past jobs reports.

Jobseekers weren't the only ones celebrating this report; the Obama administration took the opportunity to brag, as well, tweeting about the long, uninterrupted stretch of private-sector job growth.

They've been touting this streak for a long time now. So what's behind the claim? We decided to dig.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Scott Walker never got the chance to officially face off with Donald Trump at the ballot box — but if the GOP front-runner loses on the Wisconsin governor's home turf, it still could be a victory of sorts for the former presidential candidate.

Like so many Americans approaching retirement, Virginia Republican Rep. Scott Rigell dreams about spending a little more time on the water.

"I have a little rowboat called Miss Nelly. She's 13 feet long, and there's not a motor on it. There's no radio on it. And I'm so looking forward to being on that rowboat," says Rigell.

Rigell is retiring after just six years in Congress. He was one of the 87 Republicans who rode the Tea Party wave to a pivotal GOP takeover of the House.

For months, the two leading Republican candidates have tried to prove they're tough on Muslims. Donald Trump famously introduced the idea of a temporary ban on Muslim immigration, and then, last month, the businessman-turned-politician said he believes "Islam hates us." Texas Sen.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Tadaima. Okaeri.

Paired together, these two Japanese words are a common greeting-and-response. Tadaima means "I'm home," and okaeri means "welcome." But recently, these terms have taken on new significance as the names for a series of California-based conferences for the Japanese-American queer community and their allies: Okaeri in Los Angeles in 2014, and Tadaima on April 2nd in the Bay Area.

Bernie Sanders and his supporters don't consider moving Hillary Clinton to the left a goal or even really a victory of any kind. They want to change America, not the stated positions of another candidate. And while he may not be beating her in the delegate race at the moment, there's an argument that Sanders has already won by getting the issues he cares about into the political blood stream.

Bernie Sanders' appearance on New York City's Hot 97 Ebro In The Morning started as just another stop on his campaign's push to win over the state's voters before its primary later this month. On the show Friday, Sanders gave his usual stump, talking about income inequality, his tax plan and affordable education to listeners of one of the city's leading hip-hop stations.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

According to Donald Trump, he's got an amazing relationship with women.

"I respect women. I love women. I cherish women!" Trump said at political conference last year, but it's a version of a line he repeats often on the campaign trail.

His poll numbers and recent comments, though, tell a slightly different story. Trump's favorability numbers with female voters are low enough that they could cause a problem for him should he be the candidate in the general election.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump has some big polling problems. Yes, the GOP front-runner has blown away his opponents in many primaries and caucuses. But he also suffers from ultrahigh unfavorable ratings, even among the groups that should like him.

On Thursday, he tweeted that he could bring the Republican Party together, on the same day that two different polls showed the difficulties he might still face as the campaign wears on.

This week, the NPR Politics team talks Trump controversy, including his remarks on abortion and his response to the battery charge his campaign manager is facing.

The team also previews the Wisconsin and New York primaries, and takes on why so many New Yorkers were aghast at how John Kasich ate his pizza.

On the podcast:

  • Campaign Reporter Sam Sanders
  • Congressional Reporter Susan Davis
  • Campaign Reporter Asma Khalid
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Wisconsin holds its primary on Tuesday — it's a key state with 42 delegates at stake on the GOP side. Ted Cruz has been gaining strength in the state, where and after lagging at first, he's now leading Donald Trump in polls.

In recent days, Donald Trump has given a series of in-depth interviews shedding some light on what he means by the policy he calls "America First." The interviews are giving a clearer picture of the Republican presidential hopeful's approach to foreign policy.

Here are four things to know about Donald Trump's foreign policy:

1. It's unpredictable ... by design.

Reporters covering Donald Trump never know what he'll say or do next. And that's the way he likes it. Trump thinks it's an advantage for the United States to keep foreign leaders guessing.

Meet Yetta Bronstein, candidate for president.

At least, she was a presidential candidate — kind of. In the 1960s, a pair of professional pranksters, husband and wife Alan and Jeanne Abel, orchestrated an election-year hoax with Bronstein, a politician as much as she was a fiction.

"Yetta Bronstein lives in the Bronx. She has a boy named Marvin. He plays the drums, badly," recalls Jeanne. "And one day she decides to run for president!"

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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