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At his first news conference following his party's shocking loss at the ballot box last week, President Obama appeared to needle Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton's campaign for not paying enough attention to rural voters who eventually handed President-elect Donald Trump the upset victory. "When your team loses, everybody gets deflated, and it's hard, and it's challenging," Obama said. "I think it's a healthy thing for the Democratic Party to go through some reflection." "We have to compete...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: Donald Trump had campaigned on the promise of deporting all of the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants who live in the U.S. But on Sunday he narrowed his focus to those with criminal records during an interview with "60 Minutes." (SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "60 MINUTES") DONALD TRUMP: What we are going to do is get the people that are criminal and have criminal records - gang members, drug dealers. We have a lot...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: Trump has said one of his top priorities as president is to repeal and replace Obamacare, but Senate Democrats could make an outright repeal tough. Trump says he'll consider keeping two popular provisions, a requirement that insurers cover people with existing conditions and another that lets children stay on their parents' policies until age 26. As NPR's Alison Kodjak reports, there are several ways to get rid...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: Much of America moved to the right in last Tuesday's election. In deep-red Kansas, voters moved the state back towards the middle. As Sam Zeff from member station KCUR reports, that move included keeping four state Supreme Court justices after a bitter and expensive campaign. SAM ZEFF, BYLINE: Conservatives led by Republican Governor Sam Brownback thought this was the year voters would boot four justices over...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: President Obama had a message today for President-elect Donald Trump and the incoming administration. Now comes the hard part. Obama took questions from reporters for the first time since the election. He suggested that despite their policy differences, there might be more continuity than many people expect when Trump moves into the White House. NPR's Scott Horsley is with us now to talk about that. Hi, Scott....

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: Nearly a week after the presidential election, the Associated Press has now declared Hillary Clinton the winner in New Hampshire. Clinton beat Donald Trump by less than 3,000 votes. This news doesn't change the outcome of the race. Donald Trump is still president-elect. Exit polls in New Hampshire show that one of the main reasons many people voted for Trump was that they didn't trust the government. NPR's Hansi...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: Ahead of a trip overseas, President Obama is putting an optimistic face on the election of Donald Trump. Obama spoke at a news conference at the White House this afternoon. He said, Trump is ultimately pragmatic, not ideological - those his words. And he told reporters that Americans and foreign leaders should be reassured about Trump's commitment to American alliances. (SOUNDBITE OF PRESS CONFERENCE) PRESIDENT...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: Donald Trump has richly rewarded his campaign's CEO, Steve Bannon, with an appointment as chief White House strategist. That appointment has inspired a firestorm. Bannon's critics say his right-wing news site, Breitbart, spreads hate and bigotry, as NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik reports. And just a note - this story has language that some listeners might find offensive. DAVID FOLKENFLIK, BYLINE: Steve...

If you followed the presidential polls at all closely, chances are that you expected Hillary Clinton to win last week. So did all of the major prediction models that use polls to game out election outcome probabilities. So perhaps everyone should have expected that in a year when all political norms were broken, the polls that the political world fixates upon would also prove to be flawed. Pollsters will be digging for months (at least) to figure out how exactly their results may have been...

It didn't get a lot of attention – and maybe that was intentional - but a new website from President-elect Donald Trump's transition team went live last week. It's too soon to judge the Trump administration's aesthetic sensibilities, but the new site provides some clues. "It could've been stolen from the Reagan campaign of 1984, how 'It's Morning in America again,'" said H.W. Brands, an American history professor at the University of Texas-Austin and the author of Reagan: The Life ....

Advisers to President-elect Donald Trump are considering whether to retain FBI Director James Comey after the agency became an issue in one of the most divisive campaigns in modern history, three sources told NPR. Comey has nearly seven years left to serve in his 10-year term. The FBI director's position extends beyond the term of any single president to help insulate the bureau from political forces as it pursues sensitive criminal and national security investigations. But that arrangement...

Even before any election happens, it's pretty easy to predict where the demographic fault lines will be: whites tend to vote more Republican than non-whites. Women tend to vote more Democratic than men. This year, it became clear that there was a growing gap between white voters with college degrees, who tend to vote more Democratic, and those without degrees, who vote more Republican. Here's another divide that started to get more attention this election: the rural-urban gap. Rural voters...

Millennials might have been Hillary Clinton's Achilles' heel on Tuesday night. Obama won 60 percent of the millennial vote. Clinton got only about 55 percent. (We're using "millennials" as shorthand for voters between the ages of 18 and 29, but some millennials are in their 30s). But it's not that young voters across the country were necessarily flocking to the Republican Party this year. The real shift seems to have come from an increase in third-party candidate support, potentially low...

Reince Priebus once joked about his job as chairman of the Republican National Committee that people assumed he must be miserable. But Priebus said he didn't see it that way. "I'm not pouring Bailey's in my cereal," he told CNN. Now, as newly named chief of staff to President-elect Donald Trump, Priebus has his work cut out for him. Priebus will have a large say in hiring West Wing staff, and will "be in charge of day to day operations," he told Fox News on Monday morning. He'll also have the...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: Donald Trump White House is taking shape. Over the weekend, President-elect Trump named Reince Priebus, chairman of the Republican National Committee, as his chief of staff. He's an establishment Republican seen as someone who might be able to work closely with congressional Republican leaders. The appointment getting more attention this morning is newly named chief White House strategist, Stephen Bannon. He is...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: And we are getting our first indications of what Donald Trump's White House will look like. The president-elect has chosen Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus to serve as his chief of staff. Another key role will be filled by Steve Bannon, the provocative former executive of the right wing website Breitbart, who also served as CEO of the Trump campaign. NPR's Scott Horsley joins us to talk about...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: During the presidential campaign, both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump boasted about long lists of generals and military officials who were backing each of their campaigns. One person supporting Clinton, retired Army Colonel Peter Mansoor. He served 26 years in the military. He's a professor of military history at Ohio State University. And Clinton, he had said, was the first Democratic presidential candidate he...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Finally, if you've been listening this weekend, then you know we turned over yesterday's entire hour to reflections from people with whom we've been speaking over the course of the election year. This included people who identify as Republican and Democrat and neither, people who supported Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton or neither. We wanted to hear what they had to say about the election and what they see going...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR . MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: We move now to the continent of Africa. While there are more questions than answers about President-elect Donald Trump's foreign policy priorities, Africa has barely registered on his radar, at least publicly. Apart from some provocative comments about Muslims and immigration, very little is known of Mr. Trump's views about the continent. However, Africa seems to have some views already about Donald Trump. NPR's Africa...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: We have one more story about the election, this time from the entertainment world. Donald Trump's election prompted a burning question from fans of political satire. What will "Saturday Night Live" say? The show has a long history of defining pivotal elections through parody, and it earned some of its best ratings in years in part because of Alec Baldwin's devastating parody of Donald Trump. "SNL's" first post...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: We begin this hour with some news from the incoming administration. President-elect Donald Trump is starting to put the pieces into place. This afternoon, Trump announced that his White House team will be led by Steve Bannon, the former head of Breitbart News who worked as his campaign CEO, and Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus, who will serve as White House chief of staff. NPR lead political...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: And I alluded to this earlier, but since Donald Trump's election last Tuesday, there have been many reports of threats and other types of harassment aimed at minorities around the country. NPR's Eyder Peralta tells us more about that, and also about calls for dialogue. EYDER PERALTA, BYLINE: The ugliness has been on full display on social media channels. Here's one video taken on a metro train in the San...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Let's take a few minutes now to check in with a close adviser to Donald Trump on matters of policy. Thomas J. Barrack Jr. is founder and executive chairman of Colony Capital. That's a real estate investment firm based in Los Angeles. He's been a member of the inner circle of Donald Trump's economic advisers during the campaign. Barrack has experience in government, having served as deputy undersecretary of the...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: More on international reaction now. Over the past several years, U.S.-Russia relations have deteriorated. But President-elect Trump and President Vladimir Putin say they are hoping to forge stronger ties. And that worries some of Russia's neighbors. Baltic states Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia are all NATO members, and they are nervous about Trump's criticisms of NATO, especially as Russia seeks to weaken that...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Now let's spend some time looking at how Donald Trump's election has been received in a number of world capitals. First to Mexico. The president-elect's pledge to rip up the North American Free Trade Agreement, which he repeated often, has gotten much attention there. While it isn't clear how far Donald Trump can or will go to fulfill that promise, Mexicans are already getting a taste of what that could mean...

Less than a week after his election, Donald Trump has begun to fill out the team he plans to bring with him to the White House. The president-elect announced Sunday that he has selected Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus to serve as chief of staff in his incoming administration. In the same announcement, Priebus' appointment shared top billing with the news that Trump campaign CEO Stephen K. Bannon will serve as chief strategist and senior counselor to the president. "I am...

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET He'll build a border wall and he'll deport millions of people who are in the U.S. illegally, President-elect Donald Trump says, promising to keep his campaign pledges on immigration in his first prolonged interview since winning the White House. Saying that his administration will deport "probably 2 million" — and possibly 3 million — people who are in the country illegally, Trump told 60 Minutes' Lesley Stahl that he wants to secure the...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. RACHEL MARTIN, HOST: The 2016 election exposed a deep divide in the country, as we've been talking about, over race, ethnicity, gender, economic opportunity, demography. Hollywood is often seen as a bastion of liberal elites, and yet it makes the shows and films that are meant to appeal to the whole country. We talked with Kenya Barris a few days ago, the creator of the network sitcom, "Black-ish," about the conversations he and his...

Copyright 2016 KUER-FM. To see more, visit KUER-FM . RACHEL MARTIN, HOST: The conservative Mormon town of Provo, Utah will soon open its first LGBT resource center. It stands directly across the street from a church temple. It's been a fraught year for relations between the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints and LGBT people. Organizers hope this new center will bring Provo together to help youth in need. Here's Andrea Smardon. ANDREA SMARDON, BYLINE: Volunteers are planting trees...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. RACHEL MARTIN, HOST: Over the last year, we've made several trips to Charlotte, N.C, to talk with voters there about the election. One of the Trump supporters we met early on in the primaries was a guy named Don Reid, a former Charlotte city council member who is semi-retired but owns a small marketing firm. This past week, we called him up to ask him about what Tuesday night was like for him. DON REID: Other than the birth of my...

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