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After months of trading public criticisms regarding the proposed Iranian nuclear deal, President Obama will host Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House on Nov. 9.

The White House said in a statement that Obama "looks forward to discussing with the Prime Minister regional security issues, including implementation of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action to peacefully and verifiably prevent Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon, and countering Tehran's destabilizing activities."

Attention, Republican presidential candidates who say they want to make America great again! Yes, we're talking to you, Donald Trump: President Obama thinks you've got it all wrong.

In remarks Wednesday morning to the Business Roundtable, a group of business executives, Obama took issue with some of the rhetoric being used by GOP presidential candidates. "Despite the perennial doom and gloom that I guess is inevitably part of a presidential campaign," Obama said, " America is winning right now. America is great right now."

Much of America's political focus has understandably been on the 2016 presidential race. There is, however, a more immediate problem on the horizon.

Congress has two weeks to pass a measure to keep the government funded beyond Sept. 30. If no agreement is reached, federal agencies could be shuttered again — the second time in three years.

In a small state like Iowa with so many presidential candidates on the ground, the homegrown political talent to support those campaigns is stretched thin.

Joe Shannahan knows firsthand how tough the market for experienced political operatives is in the Hawkeye State these days.

"This year, it's difficult to find staff, because there are so many campaigns," says Shannahan, a partner with LS2Group in Des Moines, a public relations firm that often hires former campaign workers from both parties.

A deep-pocketed conservative group is going on the attack against Donald Trump, spending $1 million on TV ads in Iowa in an effort to weaken the GOP presidential front-runner.

Fifteen presidential candidates debated Wednesday night, split into two groups. The prime-time debate had 11 on stage at once, which means the moderators had their work cut out for them.

Fifteen Republican presidential candidates debated Wednesday night in California — the second Republican debate this season.

NPR's live debate chat is now closed, but you can see the archived chat below and post in the comments at the bottom of the page.

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Donald Trump went and gave a speech Tuesday night on the deck of a battleship, the appropriately named USS Iowa. Reporters were expecting a policy speech. What followed was not that at all.

But that's really not the point.

Toward the end of the 13-minute speech, Trump said 178 words that might explain his appeal to conservatives better than almost anything else. (More on that below.)

First, to the policy ...

Expect Wednesday night's second GOP presidential debate to be open season on front-runner Donald Trump. The 11 top Republican contenders will take the stage at 8 p.m. ET at the Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, Calif., and their unified goal appears to be to get something to stick to the billionaire real-estate mogul. Trump has so far proved to be made of something akin to Teflon.

In 2012, nearly three-quarters of Asian-American voters went for President Obama. But, rewind — 20 years prior — and you'll find fewer than a third voted Democrat.

In fact, in the span of two decades, the Asian-American vote in presidential elections has gone from being solidly Republican, to increasingly Democrat.

Analysts have described the Asian-American political shift as the most dramatic swing in recent presidential voting behavior across any demographic. But how did it happen?

When 11 Republican presidential hopefuls take the debate stage in California on Wednesday night, it will be Carly Fiorina's first time in the prime-time event. It's a big opportunity for an outsider candidate whose campaign has struggled to pick up steam, even as other outsiders are rising.

Fiorina will have to contend with one of them — Donald Trump — just one week after Rolling Stone quoted him as saying, "Look at that face!" and "Would anyone vote for that?"

What kind of messages get ignored? What kind prompt you to do something?

Those are questions that a small group of behavioral scientists at the White House has been working on since early last year.

The Social and Behavioral Sciences Team is seeking ways to improve government efficiency and access to government programs through easy, low-cost interventions.

Donald Trump's rallies tend to feel more like a playoff game or music concert than electoral politics. There's an expectation of entertainment — older couples are dressed up, and people are friendly and excited. Monday night's large rally at a basketball arena in Dallas was no exception.

"He's telling me everything I want to hear. I'm for change; I'm fed up with the 30 years of empty suits in Washington," said Brian Markum, an energy consultant who came to the rally with his wife.

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Here's a riddle: Two senators and two governors walk into a presidential library. Where are they seated once they arrive?

Answer: The kids' table. Well, the kids' table DEBATE. That's what a lot of people have taken to calling the second-tier Republican presidential debates, those held for GOP contenders who haven't cracked the Top 10 in polls.

This story is part of NPR's series Journey Home. We're going to the places presidential candidates call home and finding out what those places tell us about how they see the world.

Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina is known for her tenure running Hewlett-Packard in California. But Washington, D.C., is where she got her start in business and where colleagues say she displayed the same aggressiveness and determination that propelled her to the main stage of Wednesday night's GOP debate.

Gentlemen, start your spending.

Jeb Bush and the superPAC supporting him have raised the most money of any campaign so far. And now, post-Labor Day, the superPAC is about to put that money to use.

People are all about frictionless transactions online. That's why vendors have made it as easy as possible for us to buy products or make payments with a single click, scroll or tap.

Now it's easier to make campaign contributions, too, with Twitter's Tuesday morning announcement that the social media platform's users will be able to make direct campaign contributions for the first time. The new feature has the potential to reshape how money is raised in political campaigns, especially as other social-media organizations are likely to follow suit.

California is often considered the nation's trendsetter. But Republicans running for president better hope that's not true.

Their talk about immigration echoes what Californians heard in the 1990s. That's when Proposition 187, a ballot measure viewed as strongly anti-immigrant, was a key to the re-election of California's Republican Gov. Pete Wilson.

Defeating Democrats' attempt to filibuster a large budget shift, Republicans in Alabama's state Senate approved transferring $100 million from the education budget to the general fund to help cover a large deficit.

A critic of the move said his colleagues decided to "rob children" instead of finding the money elsewhere.

That statement came from Sen. Bobby Singleton, D-Greensboro, whose attempt to filibuster the move was cut off by the Republican supermajority.

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I'm Steve Inskeep, with the latest entry in an American tradition. It's the tradition of American politicians who come out of prison and run for mayor.

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Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, whose battles with labor unions in his own state made him a hero to Republicans, is now proposing huge restrictions on unions nationally as he seeks to revitalize his presidential campaign.

On Monday, Walker released an eight-page plan to take on unions, titled "My Plan to Give Power to the People, Not the Union Bosses."

He's vowing to:

  • Eliminate the National Labor Relations Board, or NLRB.

There's no question that in a crowded primary field, a nationally televised presidential debate is a key moment. "Every time you get a chance to be in front of 20, 25 million people in this race, it's important," New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said Sunday on Meet the Press.

But as social media have made big events like debates increasingly an interactive experience, with many viewers watching with their computers, smartphones and tablets open to Facebook or Twitter, campaigns have stepped up their digital debate strategy, too.

Voting machines around the United States are coming to the end of their useful lives. Breakdowns are increasingly common. Spare parts are difficult, if not impossible, to find. That could be a serious problem for next year's presidential elections.

Allen County, Ohio, election director Ken Terry knows how bad things can get. In the last presidential election, he had to replace the Zip disks — a 1990s technology — in the main machine his county uses to count votes. The disks are no longer made. And when he finally got some from the voting machine manufacturer:

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And now to the intersection of technology and politics for this week's All Tech Considered.