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Now more on today's new executive order on immigration. It includes several modifications to the first one which was blocked by the courts. Iraq has been removed from the list of banned countries. We'll have detail on that change in a moment.

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Full Frontal host Samantha Bee makes no bones about the fact that she was caught off guard by Donald Trump's victory on election night.

"We had a balloon drop planned. ... We had balloons in our rafters, and we had to call it [off]," Bee tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "We were able to do a reset, but it was not an easy process by any means."

President Trump signed a new executive order on Monday, after his first action temporarily barring refugees and travel from specific majority-Muslim countries faced a slew of criticism and lawsuits. The revised order has a number of changes, including dropping Iraq from the list of countries with restrictions. It also explicitly does not apply to lawful permanent residents (green card holders) or existing visa holders.

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President Trump, who still has hundreds of senior level positions to fill at nearly every federal agency, told interviewers last week that "you don't need all those jobs."

But even if that's the case, simply leaving posts vacant may not be the best way to accomplish what adviser Stephen Bannon referred to as "deconstructing the administrative state."

Some 1,100 political positions require Senate confirmation, and so far Trump has nominated just a handful. None of the deputy secretaries or undersecretaries at the Department of State have been named, for instance.

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Vice President Pence came to the annual Gridiron Dinner looking ever-so-slightly underdressed.

"I thought I'd be OK wearing a black tie tonight," he joked. "Then Nancy Pelosi asked me to refill her coffee."

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You could almost hear the Washington scandal machine shifting into overdrive this week.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: When were you aware that he spoke to the Russian ambassador?

Democrats have a long way to go to rebuild their party after brutal losses across the board last November. But they're seeing glimmers of hope in recent and upcoming special elections where they argue the backlash to President Trump is resulting in change at the ballot box.

For more than a year, Donald Trump has harped on white nostalgia.

A hearkening back to a rosy, but ambiguous, time in American history with his Make America Great Again slogan propelled his presidential run. It was a message, though, largely not embraced in minority communities, given that blacks, Latinos and women were fighting for equal rights during the same period Trump has indicated he believes America was great (the Industrial Revolution and the post-World War II 1940s and '50s).

Supporters of President Trump are gathering at locations across the U.S. on Saturday, in a bid to challenge what rally organizers call the country's "seditious fringe." In a series of demonstrations dubbed the "March 4 Trump" — or the Spirit of America Rallies — organizers have pledged to provide "forgotten voices a mechanism so they can be heard."

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Tom Hanks of Sully, Joe Versus the Volcano, Forrest Gump and Wait Wait Don't Tell Me fame wants the White House press corps to stay caffeinated.

The Oscar-winning actor sent a fancy Pasquini espresso machine and a bunch of espresso pods along with a typewritten note, which arrived on Thursday.

"To the White House Press Corps," Hanks wrote. "Keep up the good fight for Truth, Justice, and the American Way. Especially the Truth part."

Updated 9:17 a.m. ET Sunday with White House press secretary statement

In a string of tweets posted early Saturday morning, President Trump let loose a barrage of accusations at his predecessor. He alleged that former President Obama had his "wires tapped" in Trump Tower before Election Day last year, accusing Obama of "McCarthyism" and being a "bad (or sick) guy."

Trump, who is under significant scrutiny for his administration's contacts with Russia before he took office, offered no evidence to support his claims Saturday morning.

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Outside of show business, the presidency is one of the few jobs that comes with its own song.

In a tradition dating back to the 1800s, when the commander in chief enters the room, the U.S. Marine Band strikes up "Hail to the Chief."

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It was almost a year ago when then-candidate Donald Trump said the following (bolding ours):

"My wife is constantly saying, 'Darling, be more presidential.' I just don't know that I want to do it quite yet ... because we have a job to do. ... And we're doing so good. And we have to be tough for a little while. And I'll be — at some point, I'm going to be so presidential that you people will be so bored."

It was another big week for national education news. Here's our take on the top stories of the week.

Betsy DeVos, Donald Trump meet with HBCU leaders

The Education Secretary seems to be racking up controversies at the rate of about one per week.

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