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The U.K. held its local elections Thursday, and a brand-new political party won its first seat.

This party is comprised of just one woman, named Sally Cogley. And it has just one issue: rubbish.

In Thursday's vote to fill three Irvine Valley places on East Ayrshire Council, Cogley came in second after the Scottish National Party candidate, enough to win a seat.

For the second time in less than two weeks, the State Department has hit the "delete" button after complaints that it was promoting Trump family business endeavors.

This time, the State Department deleted a retweet of a post by President Trump's daughter, Ivanka Trump.

Shortly after the November election, President Trump's initial campaign manager Corey Lewandowski launched a new career — co-founding a lobbying firm called Avenue Strategies.

But he did not register as a lobbyist.

That caused critics to demand investigations into his lack of registration, and now, Lewandowski is quitting.

FBI Director James Comey said this week that he is "mildly nauseous" at the idea that the FBI may have swayed the presidential election results. A new report may ease that nausea, if only a little.

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Republicans in the House of Representatives got their way finally. They found enough votes to squeak through a GOP replacement health care bill yesterday. Democrats did not want them to taste victory, though.

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And we start this morning with Republicans declaring victory and Democrats singing.

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Yeah, singing - we'll get to that.

Twenty-five years ago, the 27th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified — nearly two centuries after it was written. The improbable story of how that happened starts with the Founding Fathers themselves and winds up at the University of Texas. And it's a heartening reminder of the power of individuals to make real change.

Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal has signed a bill legalizing the concealed carry of firearms in some areas of public college and university campuses.

Last year, many against the bill celebrated strong language in Governor Deal's veto of a similar bill.

In that veto, Deal's office said it was "highly questionable" that the bill would make students safer.

The health care bill passed by the House on Thursday is a win for the wealthy, in terms of taxes.

Like a lot of creatives distressed by the current political climate, filmmakers Daniel Klein and Mirra Fine want to tell stories that matter right now. They want to make a difference.

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We're going to talk more about this executive order with Charles Haynes. He is director of the Religious Freedom Center at the Newseum. Welcome to the program.

CHARLES HAYNES: Thank you. Thanks for having me.

President Trump signed an executive order Thursday "promoting free speech and religious liberty." The order relaxes political restrictions on religious groups of all denominations. NPR reporters annotated the order below adding context and analysis.

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President Trump rolled out a long-awaited executive order today. He said it would protect Americans' religious freedom from government interference.

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President Trump and congressional Republicans are one step closer to fulfilling their campaign pledge to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. The House voted along party lines today to advance a bill to get rid of major parts of the law.

House Republicans have passed a bill to replace the Affordable Care Act. If it is signed into law, the American Health Care Act will affect access to health care for millions of people in the U.S.

House Republicans approved their plan to replace the Affordable Care Act on Thursday.

Here's a rundown of key provisions in the American Health Care Act and what would happen if the Senate approves them and the bill becomes law.

Buying insurance

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The House of Representatives is debating the GOP bill to repeal and replace the key pillars of President Obama's health care law. This is the same bill that was pulled from the House floor just over a month ago when it was clear Republicans didn't have the votes to pass it. Now, they think they do, and the House is on track to vote on the bill early Thursday afternoon.

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

Republicans finally got their health care bill.

After seven years of repeal-and-replace rhetoric against the Affordable Care Act, two presidential campaigns waged for and against it and a recent high-profile failure, House Republicans passed their bill.

The trouble is this bill is unlikely to ever become law — at least in its current iteration.

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