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Donald Trump urged Russian agents to "find" his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton's emails and release them, an unprecedented move by a candidate for president encouraging such a foreign breach.

"Russia, if you're listening, I hope you're able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing," the GOP presidential nominee said at a news conference in Miami on Wednesday. "I think you will probably be rewarded mightily by our press."

Bill Clinton had a formidable challenge on Tuesday: to sell the American people on one of the most disliked presidential nominees in U.S. history. He had to "humanize" her, in punditspeak — Hillary Clinton is more of an idea or icon to people than a person, as NPR's Steve Inskeep suggested Tuesday night.

The Tuesday night session of the Democratic convention was really three events, each with its own atmosphere and impact, but all contributing to a single theme: The Clintons are back.

Tonight President Obama will take the stage at the Democratic National Convention with one goal: convincing voters to elect Hillary Clinton as his successor.

The stakes are high for the newly minted nominee, but they are arguably even higher for the incumbent president. A Clinton win would mean his policy legacy is kept intact and there's validation of his tenure in the White House.

When Joe Biden takes the stage at the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night, there is probably a part of him that still wonders, "What if?"

But his own White House dreams and reported rivalry with Hillary Clinton will have to be in the rearview mirror in order for him to deliver a home run endorsement, starting on stage and continuing through November.

President Obama likes to say he has run his last campaign. But he's determined to give Hillary Clinton a running start toward her own November election, mindful that much of his legacy depends on her crossing the finish line into the White House.

"I'm ready to pass the baton," Obama told supporters at a joint rally with Clinton in Charlotte, N.C., earlier this month. "I know she can run that race: the race to create good jobs, and better schools, and safer streets, and a safer world."

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Hundreds marched 6 miles through the heart of the nation's birthplace on Tuesday in the first high-profile street protest for more police accountability during the Democratic National Convention.

Organized by activists from the Black Lives Matter movement and other groups with the Philly Coalition for R.E.A.L. Justice, the hours-long demonstration started in North Philadelphia, a historically black neighborhood sprinkled with vacant lots and boarded-up buildings that had been left out of the convention's spotlight.

Hundreds of Bernie Sanders supporters walked out of the Democratic National Convention in protest Tuesday, after the roll call vote of state delegates was completed with Hillary Clinton officially receiving her party's presidential nomination. The walkout came after the Vermont senator moved to nominate Clinton through acclamation, basically turning his delegates over to her.

It's no secret actress Susan Sarandon is not a fan of Hillary Clinton. The vocal Bernie Sanders supporter said earlier this summer that "in a way she's more dangerous" than Donald Trump, especially when it comes to military intervention.

As the Democratic National Convention opened Monday night, a large contingent of Sanders supporters disrupted the night's program with boos and jeers, especially when Clinton's name was spoken.

Sarandon's disdain was clearly visible on her face during the convention, as seen in this GIF that went viral Monday night:

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The Democratic National Convention made history Tuesday evening: Amid applause, shouts, cheers and in some cases tears, the delegates on the floor of the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia nominated Hillary Clinton for president of the United States.

Clinton is now the first female presidential candidate of a major American party.

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Donald Trump so far has stayed away from the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia - but he's made his presence known on the campaign trail this week. The turmoil at the DNC convention has been constant theme of Trump's speeches as he and his running mate travel the country, campaigning and fundraising.

In her speech Monday night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Michelle Obama said she wakes up "every morning in a house that was built by slaves." She spoke about the feeling of watching her daughters, "two beautiful, intelligent, black young women, playing with their dogs on the White House lawn."

If Hillary Clinton wins the White House in November, she would be the first female president of the United States.

There would be a few other firsts in the family that night as well: Bill Clinton would be the first man married to a U.S. president. He would also become the first former president to become the first spouse.

Tuesday night, Bill Clinton addresses the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia to make the case for his wife. It will be his 10th time addressing the DNC.

Maryland Democratic Sen. Barbara Mikulski and Georgia Rep. John Lewis will formally nominate Hillary Clinton for the presidency on Tuesday night, PBS NewsHour's John Yang and NPR's Mara Liasson report.

Democrats have become accustomed to having the best speech at their quadrennial convention given by someone named Obama. This year, that person might also be named Michelle.

Hers was not the keynote, nor the most anticipated, nor the longest speech of the night. But it mesmerized and subdued the raucous and rebellious crowd, focusing the enormous energy of Philadelphia's Wells Fargo Arena just where convention organizers had hoped — on Hillary Clinton.

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