Politics

It's All Politics
8:33 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

On Links As In Life, D.C. Bipartisan Relations Are Deep In The Rough

Hill staffers and PGA professionals mingle Wednesday at this year's National Golf Day event on Capitol Hill, which included an annual Democrats versus Republicans putting challenge.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 8:32 am

Earlier this week, members of Congress and their staffs were greeted by a makeshift golf expo set up in the Rayburn House Office Building.

The event included golf shot simulators, certified golf instructors and a putting challenge between Democrats and Republicans. It was all part of National Golf Day, an annual event organized by the industry that promotes the economic and health benefits of the sport.

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The Two-Way
6:48 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

A Ticking Clock Threatens Obama's Immigration Plan

Originally published on Sat April 18, 2015 11:07 am

A federal appeals court in New Orleans heard oral arguments in a case that could determine the viability of President Obama's plan to temporarily shield more than 4 million undocumented immigrants from deportation and issue them work permits.

At stake is whether the president will get to implement his plan before his term expires.

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Politics
4:32 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Hillary Clinton Supports Amendment To Get Hidden Money Out Of Politics

"We need to fix our dysfunctional political system and get unaccounted money out of it, once and for all, even if that takes a constitutional amendment," Hillary Clinton said at Kirkwood Community College in Iowa Tuesday.
Michael B. Thomas AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 10:27 pm

Hillary Clinton made a surprising move this week. It wasn't running for president — she'd already set the stage for that — but embracing the idea of a constitutional amendment to restrict or eliminate big money in politics.

The notion of amending the Constitution this way has been discussed, literally for decades. But Clinton is joining a new, if small, chorus of prominent politicians who are talking it up.

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Politics
3:12 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Week In Politics: Trans-Pacific Partnership, 2016 Presidential Candidates

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 8:05 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
3:12 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Lawmakers Approve Bill To Help Finalize Asia-Pacific Trade Deal

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 8:05 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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It's All Politics
2:09 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Oklahoma City Bombing A 'Wake-Up Call' For Government Security

The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was "literally right up against the road so it was extremely vulnerable," said architect Barbara Nadel. One of the government's first responses was to close a two-block stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 18, 2015 11:22 am

Twenty years ago this Sunday, a truck bomb exploded next to the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. One hundred sixty-eight people were killed in the blast, hundreds were injured.

The bombing prompted heightened security at federal buildings — around the nation, and especially here in Washington.

One of the government's first responses to the bombing was closing a two-block stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House.

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It's All Politics
1:29 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

5 Things You Should Know About Mike Huckabee

Huckabee ran the Marine Corps Marathon in 2005.
Kevin Wolf AP

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 10:21 am

This post was updated at 12:15 p.m. E.T. Tuesday

When former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee ran for president in 2008, he surprised many political watchers with a big a victory in the Iowa caucus. "What we have seen is a new day in American politics," he said after he was declared the winner. "This election will start a prairie fire of hope and zeal."

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The Two-Way
1:19 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Why A Blockbuster Of A Trade Deal With Asia Matters

Freighters wait to unload cargo at the Tanjung Pagar container port in Singapore.
Roslan Rahman AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 3:51 pm

It has been a decade in the making, but when completed, it will be a free trade agreement to beat all others — representing 40 percent of the world's economy.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP, agreement would bring together the economies of the U.S., Japan, Australia and nine other Pacific Rim nations, allowing the free trade of everything from agriculture to automobiles and textiles to pharmaceuticals.

President Obama said Friday that the deal is critical for the U.S. market.

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The Two-Way
12:38 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

#NPRreads: From The Hell Of The North To 'Trash' Food

#NPRreads is a new feature we're testing out on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers throughout our newsroom will share pieces that have kept them reading. They'll share tidbits on Twitter using the #NPRreads hashtag, and on occasion we'll share a longer take here on the blog.

This week, we share with you five reads.

From Ina Jaffe, a correspondent on NPR's National Desk:

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Politics
4:51 am
Fri April 17, 2015

Senator's 'Let It Go' Ringtone Disrupts Committee Hearing

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 5:35 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Health
3:51 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Congress Repeals Medicare 'Doc Fix' Law, Ending Annual Scramble

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 5:40 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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It's All Politics
3:38 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

The Most Corrupt State In The Country Is ...

High-profile politicians have been brought up on charges in recent years, but which places do people think are most corrupt?
Collection Agency flickr Creative Commons

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 11:14 am

Politics, power and more money than ever can create an environment ripe for corruption.

But which states are the most corrupt, and how is that even defined?

A poll out from Monmouth University asked Americans what they think are the most corrupt states. Overall, there was not much of a consensus, but New York rose to the top (with just 12 percent), followed by California, Illinois, New Jersey and Texas.

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It's All Politics
2:26 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

In Or Out In Congress? Gyrocopters, Tweets To Iran, Downton Abbey

An explosive ordnance disposal technician checks the gyrocopter that landed on the Capitol's South Lawn Wednesday.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 5:44 pm

In Congress, just like at any storied American institution — McDonald's, New York Fashion Week, the Bush and Clinton families — trends come and go.

The 114th Congress is now 100 days old. And it can be difficult to keep up with the goings and comings of the body and its 535 members — the negotiations, visits from world leaders, the scandals and, oh yeah, the legislation.

So here's our look at what's in and what's out on Capitol Hill:

Have something to add to the list? Tweet @nprpolitics.

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It's All Politics
6:03 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Throwback Thursday: Reagan Announces Run For President

It's been 35 years since Ronald Reagan announced his run for president. He did so just two months before the Iowa caucuses, unlike the protracted campaigning that takes place today.
WJZ AP

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 11:49 am

Times in politics have changed.

Since it's the season for presidential campaign announcements, for evidence of just how much they've changed, look back 35 years to Ronald Reagan's announcement that he was running for president.

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It's All Politics
3:03 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Vulnerable Voting Machine Raises Questions About Election Security

Voters in Los Angeles County, Calif., cast their ballots in 2012.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 18, 2015 10:17 am

Computer security experts have warned for years that some voting machines are vulnerable to attack. And this week, in Virginia, the state Board of Elections decided to impose an immediate ban on touchscreen voting machines used in 20 percent of the state's precincts, because of newly discovered security concerns.

The problems emerged on Election Day last November in Spotsylvania County. The AVS WINVote touchscreen machines used in precinct 302 began to shut down.

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It's All Politics
2:03 am
Thu April 16, 2015

The Good, The Bad And That Arrow. Not Everyone Likes The New Campaign Logos

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio waves at supporters in Miami Monday.
Wilfredo Lee AP

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 12:34 pm

The first presidential candidates have declared, and that means Rand Paul, Hillary Clinton, Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio all have shiny new logos to go with their new campaigns.

This early in the campaign, with little actual substance to pick apart so far, the logos are prime bait on the Internet, attracting supporters, haters, wanna-be graphic designers and more.

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National Security
3:36 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

President Obama To Remove Cuba From State-Sponsored Terrorism List

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 4:52 pm

President Obama intends to take Cuba off of the list of state sponsors of terrorism, and now Congress has a month and a half to decide if it wants to stop the process. NPR's Robert Siegel talks with Roberta Jacobson, assistant secretary of state for Western Hemisphere Affairs, who led the negotiations between the U.S. and Cuba.

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Politics
3:36 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

Sen. Corker Says Congress Didn't Yield On Compromise Iran Bill

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 4:52 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Law
1:38 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

Former FBI Agent Speaks Out: 'I Was Not Protected'

FBI headquarters in Washington, D.C.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 3, 2015 6:17 pm

Robyn Gritz spent 16 years at the FBI, where she investigated a series of major national security threats. But she says she got crosswise with her supervisors, who pushed her out and yanked her security clearance.

For the first time, she's speaking out about her situation, warning about how the bureau treats women and the effects of a decade of fighting terrorism.

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It's All Politics
9:48 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Congress Says It Will Not Tolerate 'Agents Gone Wild'

"I'm very concerned about the public's respect for law enforcement officers and the safety of those they are designed to protect," House Judiciary Chairman Rep. Bob Goodlatte, seen here in 2013, told NPR. "This is a very important issue to me and one I intend to follow closely."
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 3:53 pm

Update at 2:30 p.m. ET

On Wednesday, House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz and fellow committee members released a statement expressing "no confidence" in DEA Administrator Michele Leonhart.

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It's All Politics
8:03 am
Wed April 15, 2015

You Didn't Check The 'Presidential Election Campaign' Box On Your Taxes, Did You?

iStock

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 10:46 am

Here's a question for you last-minute tax filers. See that little checkoff box at the top of the 1040 tax form, the one labeled "Presidential Election Campaign"? You didn't check it, did you?

If not, then you're just like pretty much everybody else.

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Politics
3:26 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Obama, Senate Compromise Gives Congress A Say On Iran Nuclear Deal

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 12:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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NPR Story
3:10 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Clinton Tours Iowa; Begins Outlining 4 Pillars Of Her Campaign

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 10:33 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
2:04 am
Wed April 15, 2015

A Decade After Blowing The Whistle On The FBI, Vindication

Kobus alerted his managers that a supervisor was allowing favorite employees to take time off for their birthdays, so the government had to pay more for other people at the agency to work overtime. "You know, this is not our money. This is the taxpayers' money, and I want it to be correct," he says.
Courtesy of Robert Kobus

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 8:00 am

Robert Kobus doesn't fit the stereotype of the disgruntled employee. He worked in administrative jobs at the FBI for 34 years, and he says he's seen the bureau at its best.

"My sister Deborah Kobus was a 9/11 victim, and the FBI treated me so well during that time," he says. "You know they really cared. I had a lot of friends, I know how important it is to have a strong FBI."

His sister died in the World Trade Center's south tower. When he helped walk out the last piece of steel at the site, he proudly wore his FBI jacket.

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History
1:34 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Who Was John Wilkes Booth Before He Became Lincoln's Assassin?

John Wilkes Booth was the son of prominent, wealthy actors. He, too, became an actor and was so popular, he was one of the first to have his clothes ripped off by fans.
Hulton Archive Getty

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 10:33 am

John Wilkes Booth was the man who pulled the trigger, capping off a coordinated plot to murder President Abraham Lincoln.

But historian Terry Alford, an expert on all things Booth, says that there's much more to Booth's life. His new biography, Fortune's Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth, delves deep into his life — before Booth went down in history as the man who assassinated a president.

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The Two-Way
10:41 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Congress Approves Longer-Term Fix For Medicare Reimbursements

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 5:49 pm

The Senate gave final passage Tuesday night to a lasting fix for a long-running problem with Medicare reimbursements for doctors, NPR's Giles Snyder reports. Doctors faced a 21 percent reduction in the fees.

Eight senators, all Republicans, voted against the bill because funding has not been fully allocated for its $214 billion cost. According to the Congressional Budget Office, the bill will add $141 billion to the federal budget deficit in the next decade.

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Politics
4:11 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Senate Panel Backs Bill To Allow Congressional Review Of Iran Deal

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 3:49 am

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee unanimously voted Tuesday in support of a bill that would give Congress a role in approving the Iran nuclear agreement.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Something unusual took place on Capitol Hill this afternoon.

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History
3:38 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Andrew Johnson's Presidency Highlighted Issues With Vice Presidential Selection

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 5:45 pm

NPR's Robert Siegel interviews University of Virginia historian Barbara Perry about the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the Andrew Johnson presidency. Perry explains how he was chosen as vice president, and how he suddenly became president after President Abraham Lincoln's assassination.

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Politics
3:38 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Presidential Campaign Logos Reach New Level Of Sophistication

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 5:45 pm

From water bottles and bumper stickers, to fundraising emails and Twitter accounts, the logos of the 2016 presidential candidates will soon be plastered across the country. Graphic designer Armin Vit tells NPR about the designs so far.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Politics
3:38 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Presidential Candidates Move Away From Public Financing

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 5:45 pm

You can still check the box on your 1040 federal income tax return and earmark $3 for presidential public financing. This Watergate-era reform was supposed to push big money out of presidential politics, but so far this cycle, not many people have checked it.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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