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Steven Hall ran the CIA's Russia operations for years — and he calls attempts to leverage Trump campaign aides a textbook case of recruitment by Russian spies. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Hall about this week's revelations in the ongoing Russian investigation.

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Can a puppy video get you to buy health insurance through the Affordable Care Act exchanges? Florida Blue, a major insurer in that state, hopes the answer is yes.

Hillary Clinton seemed startled by the question.

But asked Monday night at an event promoting her new book what she was going as for Halloween, she said, "I have to start thinking about it. ... I think I will maybe come as the president."

It wasn't clear whether she meant President Trump or just "as president."

That got laughs. But if you're like Clinton and maybe pulling on a Trump mask or a Sean Spicer lectern or maybe even a Hillary Clinton pantsuit for Halloween Tuesday, you'll be like roughly 2 percent of the population.

When conservative commentator and host Rush Limbaugh opened his radio show Monday, indictments had just been made public in Washington, D.C., against President Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort. Manafort and one of his top lieutenants had been taken into custody on charges of money laundering and tax evasion. Special counsel Robert Mueller had also secured a guilty plea from former Trump campaign aide George Papadopoulos, who admitted to lying to the FBI about contacts with Russia.

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Which of these statements seems more trustworthy to you?

1) Americans are drowning in a tsunami of ignorance! There is a conspiracy at the highest levels to replace all knowledge with propaganda and disinformation.

2) A recent Stanford University report found that more than 80 percent of middle schoolers didn't understand that the phrase "sponsored content" meant "advertising."

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Let's review what we have learned about the special counsel investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. election.

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Five months into his mandate, Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller III unleashed a legal version of "shock and awe" on Monday with criminal charges against President Trump's former campaign chairman and a guilty plea by a foreign policy aide.

Mueller made no public comment about the charges or the next steps in an investigation that's irritating the White House and riveting the nation. But there are some clues in the court documents about where the former FBI director and his investigators may be heading.

Updated at 1:40 p.m. ET

Before George Papadopoulos became the first legal casualty of Robert Mueller's investigation into Russia and the 2016 election, he was a 30-year-old energy lawyer best known in D.C. for getting name-dropped by Donald Trump and for reportedly embellishing his resume.

Twitter may be the public square of our times, but some citizens say their elected officials don't want to hear from them. It has become increasingly common for politicians at all levels of government to block followers, whether for uncivil behavior or merely for expressing a different point of view.

In life, presidents are limited to two terms, but the Constitution says nothing about occupying the White House in the afterlife. In this Halloween edition of Ron's Office Hours, NPR senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving tells some famous White House ghost stories.

Powerful Democratic lobbyist Tony Podesta says he's stepping down from the firm he and his brother built – an unexpected, bipartisan shock wave from special counsel Robert Mueller III's indictment of former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort.

The Trump administration is pushing back against a growing bipartisan push for Congress to pass a new measure authorizing the use of military force against ISIS, Al-Qaida, and other terror groups.

Facebook says 126 million people may have seen Russian content aimed at influencing Americans. Lawmakers on Capitol Hill want to weed out Russian operatives and extremist propaganda from Facebook.

But savvy marketers — people who've used Facebook's advertising platform since its inception — say that social media giant will find it hard to banish nefarious actors because its technology is designed to be wide open and simple to use.

How do you make people understand the odd forms created by gerrymandering? Make them feel it in their toes.

That's the idea behind the Gerrymander 5K happening Saturday in Asheville, N.C., which will trace the boundary between North Carolina's 10th and 11th Congressional districts.

That line splits the left-leaning city into two districts that, when combined with more conservative rural voters, both end up represented by Republicans.

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Today has brought an avalanche of developments involving Russia, the 2016 election and the Trump campaign. For months, it has been clear that special counsel Robert Mueller had his sights trained on the former chair of that campaign.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Russia Probe Results In Charges

Oct 30, 2017

The first indictment in the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election has been issued.

President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and Manafort’s former deputy Rick Gates have turned themselves in to law enforcement.

How The Cuban Migration Story Is Changing

Oct 30, 2017

With guest host John Donvan.

A Cuban family treks through a jungle for seven days on foot.

Another Cuban man gets stuck in Central America seeking freedom.

These are the stories of people NPR’s Radio Ambulante followed on their newly released two-part series covering a shift in Cuban migration to the United States.

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort and his former assistant Rick Gates have surrendered to law enforcement.

Manafort is facing a dozen charges, including conspiracy against the United States and conspiracy to launder money.

Now that the first indictments have been issued, we look at what comes next in the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Updated at 4:20 p.m. ET

Apparent Russian agents began reaching out to Donald Trump's presidential campaign as early as March 2016, the Justice Department established in documents released Monday, with appeals for partnership and offers of help including "dirt" on Trump's opponent, Hillary Clinton.

That case is made in charging documents in the case of then-Trump foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos, who pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI.

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