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The Affordable Care Act isn't perfect. Even proponents of the law would agree with that.

In many parts of the country, there is only one insurer in the individual markets — and in a few, there are zero. Premiums have spiked, sending some people on the insurance exchanges hunting for new plans.

After nearly two years without a budget, the state of Illinois and those who depend on it may be running out of time.

Lawmakers are scrambling to approve a new budget before a midnight deadline on Friday but an agreement between Republicans, led by Gov. Bruce Rauner, and the Democratic leaders in the Legislature appears distant.

When Senate Republican leaders delayed the vote on their bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., was quick to not declare victory.

"We're not resting on any laurels, nor do we feel any sense yet of accomplishment," Schumer said at his weekly press conference, shortly after the surprise GOP decision to punt on a vote. "Other than we are making progress, because the American people are listening to our arguments."

One provision of the Senate's health care bill stands to be quite popular: the Better Care Reconciliation Act would eliminate the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate. That would be repealed immediately.

Another would likely please the Republican base: defunding Planned Parenthood for a year. Those funds would disappear right away, too.

Another would threaten health care coverage for millions of Americans: a rollback to the Medicaid expansion. That change wouldn't start until 2021.

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And, Steve, did a presidential tweet just bring unity to Washington, D.C.?

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On yet another day when President Trump's tweets are dominating the news, the top Republican and Democrat leading the House Intelligence Committee's Russia probe said his tweets aren't quite enough for them.

A letter from Kris Kobach, the vice chairman of a White House commission looking into voter fraud and other irregularities, is drawing fire from some state election officials. The letter, sent Wednesday to all 50 states, requests that all publicly available voter roll data be sent to the White House by July 14, five days before the panel's first meeting.

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The political world has gotten used to daily tweet storms from President Trump, but a vicious attack today on two cable personalities is getting an intense reaction. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith reports.

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As we reach the end of LGBT Pride Month, we're going to look at a debate that has been visible at celebrations around the country.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED CROWD: (Singing, unintelligible).

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Wishy-washy, flip-flopper - people aren't always kind to those who change their views. But our Planet Money podcast thinks we should celebrate changing minds. Here's Kenny Malone.

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Senators are leaving Washington for a week-long recess, but negotiations over a repeal of the Affordable Care Act continue. Democrats are trying to ramp up pressure against the repeal effort. NPR's Scott Detrow has more.

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For more on how this revised travel ban will affect refugees, Linda Hartke joins us now. She's president of the Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service. Welcome.

LINDA HARTKE: Thank you. It's wonderful to be with you.

Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper took an unusual path to politics. A former geologist and beer brewer, he’s now a leading voice on reviving local economies.

Is Illinois a failed state?

Feeling Targeted By The Travel Ban

Jun 29, 2017

The Supreme Court has agreed to hear arguments for and against President Donald Trump’s proposed travel ban in October. Until then, parts of the ban are in effect, affecting travelers to the U.S. from six majority-Muslim countries.

Writer Wajahat Ali and attorney Rabia Chaudry are Muslim-Americans who have thought deeply on what this moment signals for the nation, both legally and morally. They weigh in on national security concerns, religious extremism and the rise in hate crimes against Muslims in the U.S.

GUESTS

John Huber is a career prosecutor in Utah who's served in both Democratic and Republican administrations. This month, the Trump White House nominated him to serve as a U.S. attorney in that state.

But it came as something of a surprise to current and former Justice Department veterans Wednesday when Huber appeared for a news conference in Washington: not in the halls of Justice, but at the White House podium.

Updated at 3:30 p.m. ET

President Trump unleashed one of the most vitriolic insults of his presidency Thursday morning, saying MSNBC Morning Joe host Mika Brzezinski was "bleeding badly from a face-lift" while at his Palm Beach, Fla., resort for New Year's Eve. He also described her as "low I.Q. Crazy Mika."

The president sent a pair of tweets aimed at Brzezinski and co-host Joe Scarborough, whom Trump called "Psycho Joe," apparently in response to Thursday morning's episode (although he tweeted that he no longer watches the show).

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To health care now - both Democrats and Republicans in the Senate are complaining that they aren't working together. Here's Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell speaking on the Senate floor yesterday.

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The height of the sex abuse crisis in the Catholic Church was almost 20 years ago, and here we are again today with a very high-profile charge.

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Republicans' attitudes toward the FBI and other federal law enforcement officials appear to be turning more negative, at least in Texas, a new poll has found. President Trump and conservative pundits have been lashing out at the Justice Department's investigation into Russian meddling in last year's election.

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Several things are different as President Trump tries again to impose a travel ban. Back in January, the administration moved abruptly to ban travel from seven majority-Muslim nations. The result was chaos at airports and multiple court orders against the ban.

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A firm headed by Paul Manafort, who served as President Trump's campaign manager last year, made more than $17 million in two years working for the pro-Russia political party that controlled Ukraine's government, according to documents filed late Tuesday.

Manafort, who resigned from Trump's campaign last August after his work for Ukrainian interests came under scrutiny, has registered as a foreign agent with the U.S. Justice Department, as did his deputy, Rick Gates.

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