Politics

Political news

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Wyoming is sometimes called the Equality State — it had the nation's first female governor and was the first territory to give women the right to vote. But that legacy isn't visible on the floor of the state Senate. Just one of the 30 state senators is a woman.

"I am the queen of the Senate. I have my own little tiara," jokes Bernadine Craft, a Democrat who represents the mining town of Rock Springs.

President Obama has cut a nuclear deal with Iran. He has scolded North Korea for its provocative nuclear tests. And he has hosted a series of global nuclear security summits in Washington.

Now there's speculation the president may visit Hiroshima, Japan, site of the world's first atomic bombing, which hastened the end of World War II more than 70 years ago.

A listener named Josh recently sent us a clip of him talking politics with his daughter, Penelope. The bit that caught our attention (and that we highlighted in our last weekly roundup podcast) was where Penelope finds out that a "girl" is running for president, then insists that her father vote for her.

He presses Penelope on this:

"What if I said I'm voting for Ted Cruz just because he's a man?" he asks.

"If he was the first man to be president," she says.

There's a strong argument to be made that Chicago's South Side is the cultural capital of black America, a place that a far-reaching who's who of black luminaries have called home — Mahalia Jackson, Louis Armstrong, Ida B. Wells, Barack Obama. But even as the South Side has played a key role in the Great Migration, it was and continues to be shaped by entrenched segregation that has choked it off from resources and development.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The opinion section of the Boston Globe is turning heads today. They've just published a fake front page from the future that details the kind of world a President Donald Trump would usher in.

The news from April 9, 2017, includes fake stories about a market crash triggered by a trade war, the beginning of mass deportations and a story about the military refusing the orders of its civilian leadership.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Former Mexican President Vicente Fox is a fierce critic of presidential candidate Donald Trump, repeatedly denouncing what he says are his "racist and ignorant ideas." Trump "says that he'll make America great again," Fox writes this week in The Guardian, "but I believe he's only making it worse."

On the way into the Colorado Republican Party's state convention in Colorado Springs Saturday morning, a Ted Cruz supporter waved a big broom with the letters "CRUZ" fastened to the top.

The convention took place in a hockey arena, and the prop is probably familiar to most sports fans. The Cruz supporter was looking for a sweep, and a sweep was what he got.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In the way only he can, former President Bill Clinton has walked back his confrontation with Black Lives Matter protesters earlier this week.

The Republican presidential primary race is revolving entirely around the Broadmoor World Arena in Colorado Springs, Colo., on Saturday.

That's where Colorado Republicans are meeting to elect 13 statewide delegates to this summer's Republican National Convention.

In a contest that takes 1,237 delegates to win the nomination, 13 – or even the full 37 Colorado will send to Cleveland — may seem like a minuscule total.

Democratic voters in Wyoming have decided: Sen. Bernie Sanders has won the state's caucuses, according to The Associated Press. But the victory over Hillary Clinton will not ensure Sanders more delegates. The state's 14 delegates will be split evenly between the two candidates.

​Hillary for America Campaign Manager Robby Mook released the following statement on Clinton's tie in pledged delegates in Wyoming:

The NPR Politics team is back with its weekly roundup of political news. The team explains the state of the primary race as it moves to New York, following wins in Wisconsin for Bernie Sanders and Ted Cruz.

The team also discusses why the gloves are coming off in the Democratic race and partakes in some taste testing of wine ice cream that was inspired by Hillary Clinton.

On the podcast:

  • Campaign Reporter Sam Sanders
  • White House Correspondent Tamara Keith
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The things they do for love.

Politicians will eat almost any food, adopt any colloquialism, endure any level of awkward — just to seem "authentic."

The latest example? Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, riding the New York subway through the Bronx, saying hi to babies and taking selfies along the way.

Depending on your point of view, the event — and it was an event — could be viewed as either a shining testament to Clinton's New York bona fides, or just the latest example of how out of touch she is.

Here's how it all happened.

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