Business

Business
3:53 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Gamers Converge On L.A. For Electronic Entertainment Expo

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 11:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The biggest players in the video gaming are gathered here in Los Angeles this week for E3, the industry's annual trade show. Gamers have been anticipating the unveiling of new products from Microsoft, Sony, Nintendo and other companies.

NPR's Laura Sydell has spent the past few days with zombies, assassins and one little plumber. Good morning.

LAURA SYDELL, BYLINE: Good morning.

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Business
3:53 am
Thu June 13, 2013

French Air Traffic Controllers Strike Disrupts Flights

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 4:56 am

French air traffic controllers are back in their towers. They had been on strike for two days — forcing the cancellation of more than 2,000 flights. But the issues at stake remain unresolved and affect the entire continent. They center on plans to reorganize and streamline the control of European airspace.

Business
3:53 am
Thu June 13, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 4:48 am

The museum in Paris has unveiled new, sophisticated LED lighting for the painting. They want to bring out her colors — the way Leonardo da Vinci might have seen them.

Business
3:53 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Will A Kill Switch Stop Cellphones From Being Stolen?

People use cellphones in downtown San Francisco. The city's district attorney and New York's attorney general plan to meet with major cellphone manufacturers, as they push the industry to do more to protect consumers from violent street crimes connected to cellphone thefts.
Ben Margot AP

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 12:05 pm

Cellphone thefts are now the single biggest source of property crime in many American cities. A recent study found that lost and stolen phones cost consumers close to $30 billion a year. And 10 percent of smartphone owners say they've had a phone stolen.

Almost everyone has a story about losing their phone; even tech reporters are not immune.

NPR's Laura Sydell lost her phone and spent over three hours skulking around San Francisco using an app and an iPad to track her phone thief.

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Dollar For Dollar: Adventures In Investing
2:26 am
Thu June 13, 2013

How To Invest In Real Estate Without Being A Landlord

NPR's Uri Berliner discovers that among his REIT holdings is one that owns the Washington, D.C., site where, until recently, NPR had its headquarters. The building is being torn down and a new building with law offices will go up in its place.
Marie McGrory NPR

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 4:32 am

NPR's Uri Berliner is taking $5,000 of his own savings and putting it to work. Though he's no financial whiz or guru, he's exploring different types of investments — alternatives that may fare better than staying in a savings account that's not keeping up with inflation.

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The Salt
11:25 am
Wed June 12, 2013

Court To Monsanto: You Said You Won't Sue, So You Can't

A farmer holds Monsanto's Roundup Ready soybean seeds at his family farm in Bunceton, Mo.
Dan Gill AP

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 11:33 am

A federal appeals court slapped down a quixotic legal campaign against Monsanto's biotech patents this week.

Organic farmers had gone to court to declare those patents invalid. The farmers, according to their lawyers, were "forced to sue preemptively to protect themselves from being accused of patent infringement" if their field became contaminated by Monsanto's genetically modified seed.

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Shots - Health News
7:48 am
Wed June 12, 2013

Hands-Free Gadgets Don't Mean Risk-Free Driving

A University of Utah volunteer drives through Salt Lake City's Avenues neighborhood as a camera tracks her eye and head movement. Another device records driver reaction time, and a cap fitted with sensors charts brain activity.
AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 9:49 am

If you've felt smug and safe using built-in, voice-controlled technology for text messages, email and phone calls while driving, forget it. There are some sobering findings about the risk of distraction from the American Automobile Association and the University of Utah.

The proliferation of hands-free technology "is a looming public safety crisis," AAA CEO Robert Darbelnet says. "It's time to consider limiting new and potentially dangerous mental distractions built into cars."

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It's All Politics
7:35 am
Wed June 12, 2013

Rick Perry's War On The Blue States

Texas Gov. Rick Perry meets with Illinois media during his April trip to lure businesses.
M. Spencer Green AP

Gov. Rick Perry's outsized Texas swagger is coming to the heart of blue state America.

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Business
3:08 am
Wed June 12, 2013

Technology Columnist Sheds Light On New Bulbs

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 3:53 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Buying a light bulb it's not as simple as it used to be. You're not just choosing between 100 watts and 75 watts, between three-way and one-way. Now you can choose light bulbs that will save you quite a bit of money and use less power. There are now bulbs that don't get hot, and you can pick a bulb that might last longer than you do.

Technology columnist Rich Jaroslovsky, at Bloomberg News, has been trying out the new bulbs and will enlighten us. Good morning, Rich.

RICH JAROSLOVSKY: Good morning.

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Business
2:41 am
Wed June 12, 2013

Google Acquires Israeli Mapping Service Waze

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 3:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And Google has announced it is buying Waze, a community-based traffic and navigation app, for a reported price of just over a billion dollars.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports it may change the way we travel.

WENDY KAUFMAN, BYLINE: Google hopes its latest acquisition will make your morning commute easier, faster and more social.

While other traffic apps are somewhat passive, Waze tracks mobile devices as they travel, and uses that information to help analyze traffic speeds and flow.

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Business
2:41 am
Wed June 12, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 3:53 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with telecom tactics.

British telecom giant Vodafone has announced it's making a bid to buy Kabel Deutschland - Germany's biggest cable company. The reported offer of over 13 billion dollars marks a major change in strategy for Vodafone. Up until now, it has focused almost entirely on the mobile phone market. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Business
2:41 am
Wed June 12, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 3:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: Big brother and bigger book sales.

The NSA's surveillance scandal has caused a jump in sales of George Orwell's classic dystopian novel "1984." Sales on Amazon.com have risen nearly 6,000 percent since news of the NSA's secret surveillance program broke, which is double plus good for a book first published 64 years ago last week.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The Salt
2:41 am
Wed June 12, 2013

Why You'll Be Paying More For Beef All This Year

With U.S. cattle herds at their lowest levels since the 1950s and corn feed prices on the rise, beef prices are on the rise.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 3:53 am

If you've experienced sticker shock shopping for ground beef or steak recently, be prepared for an entire summer of high beef prices.

Multi-year droughts in states that produce most of the country's beef cattle have driven up costs to historic highs. Last year, ranchers culled deep into their herds — some even liquidated all their cattle — which pushed the U.S. cattle herd to its lowest point since the 1950s.

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U.S.
12:55 am
Wed June 12, 2013

Immigration Bill May Keep Wage Exemption For Foreign Herders

Antonio Basualdo Solorzano has worked at the Ladder Ranch in south-central Wyoming for eight years. On his wages as a guest worker, he's supported seven children back home in Peru.
Sara Hossaini for NPR

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 3:53 am

When Patrick and Sharon O'Toole began their ranching business on the Wyoming-Colorado border, they tended the sheep themselves. But eventually, the O'Tooles wanted to settle down and have kids, so they hired foreign ranch hands with H-2A, or guest worker, visas to work on the ranch for $750 a month.

Peruvian shepherds on guest worker visas tend thousands of sheep in Wyoming, but they only make about half of what agricultural workers elsewhere are paid.

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All Tech Considered
2:33 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Did Sony Already Win Gaming's Next-Gen Console War?

Sony Computer Entertainment President and CEO Andrew House introduces the new PlayStation 4 at an Electronic Entertainment Expo media briefing in Los Angeles on Monday.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 5:20 pm

OK, so it might be a little presumptuous to call a winner considering that neither Sony's nor Microsoft's new console is on the market quite yet.

On Monday, however, on the first day of the Electronic Entertainment Expo, where the gaming industry tells consumers what to buy this holiday season, Sony dropped the mic to universal applause, as Digital Trends described it.

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Law
12:26 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Pushed Off The Job While Pregnant

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 6:20 pm

At a time when most pregnant women work, there are new efforts to keep companies from unfairly targeting employees because of a pregnancy. The allegations of pregnancy discrimination persist and have even risen in recent years despite a decades-old law against it, according to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

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Money Coach
10:04 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Interest Rates Up: Could Spell Uncertainty For Home Loans, Retirement

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
9:49 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Report: Overdraft Protection Puts Customers 'At Greater Risk'

Richard Cordray, the director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.
T.J. Kirkpatrick Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 11:44 am

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is looking at how overdraft fees affect consumers in a detailed report released Tuesday.

One of the stunning finds: "Overdraft and non-sufficient funds fees accounted for 61 percent of total consumer deposit account service charges in 2011 among the banks in the CFPB report."

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The Two-Way
7:08 am
Tue June 11, 2013

See-Through Pants Problem Behind Her, Lululemon CEO To Leave

Christine Day. She's planning to step down as CEO of Lululemon.
Brendan McDermid Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 7:51 am

Saying that "now is the right time to bring in a CEO who will drive the next phase of Lululemon's development and growth," the yoga and athletic clothing company's chief has announced she's stepping down.

Christine Day will stay on in her job until a successor is found, Lululemon says.

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Business
3:39 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Post Recession, Architects Return To The Drawing Board

While some jobs are coming back in this economy, the market for many architects remains tough. There were nearly 220,000 people working in the field in 2008. Today, more than 25 percent of those jobs are gone.

Business
3:38 am
Tue June 11, 2013

National Envelope Hopes To Lick Bankruptcy Filing

National Envelope, the largest privately-held manufacturer of envelopes in the U.S., has filed for bankruptcy protection. It's a sign of the paperless, digital times. It previously filed for Chapter 11 protection in 2010.

Around the Nation
3:23 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Iowa Rebrands Medicaid Coverage

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 5:28 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Republican governor of Iowa is one of the longest serving in U.S. history. And with a election campaign coming up next year, he's suddenly taken a keen interest in making one controversial part of Obamacare work. That's the expansion of Medicaid, something some states are still deciding whether or not to do. Iowa Public Radio's Clay Masters has more.

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Business
3:23 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Competitors Try To Chip Away At Pandora's Audience

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 4:56 am

On Monday, Apple announced iRadio — its entry into the crowded field of music streaming services. iTunes has become the top music retailer by selling song files. But no one in the music business thinks the iTunes model is the future. Pandora is the oldest and most successful streaming service so far. But it's been a disappointment to investors.

Business
3:23 am
Tue June 11, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 5:08 am

Florida's housing market is picking up in places, but a home in Palm Beach just sold for more than 40 percent less than the asking price. The 20,000 square foot home was originally on the market for $74 million. According to The Wall Street Journal, it sold on Friday for a mere $42 million.

Law
3:23 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Feds Buckle On Emergency Contraception Age Restrictions

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer. The morning after pill is moving from behind the counter to on the shelf. Last night, the Obama administration announced it will comply with a court order that allows girls and women of any age to buy the emergency contraception without a prescription and without showing ID.

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Business
3:23 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Data Leak Could Undermine Trust In Government Contractor

Federal contractor Booz Allen Hamilton, headquartered in McLean, Va., employed Edward Snowden, the computer technician at the center of the controversy over leaks involving the National Security Agency.
Michael Reynolds EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 9:56 am

In recent decades, a quiet revolution has been transforming the way Washington works.

Because the U.S. government does not have the workforce to complete all of its tasks, it employs private companies like Booz Allen Hamilton to do the work for it. Booz Allen is the company where Edward Snowden, who said he leaked secrets about the National Security Agency, most recently worked.

Over the past 25 years, this contract workforce has grown and plays a major role in the U.S. government, says Paul Light, a professor of public service at New York University.

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Business
3:23 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 5:01 am

On Monday, the company announced that CEO Christine Day will step down once a replacement is found. This comes after an embarrassing year for the company which makes fashionable yoga-wear. A recent recall of see-through plants could cost the company $40 million.

All Tech Considered
3:39 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

What You Need To Know About Changes Coming From Apple

Apple unveiled its new mobile operating system, iOS 7.
Apple

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 4:54 pm

If you opt for the upgrade, changes are coming to your iPhone experience this fall. And if you want to shell out some cash right away, the latest line of MacBook Air computers boasts a lot more power and battery life, and the machines are available to ship today.

Apple chiefs announced their latest products and improvements Monday as part of the keynote at the company's annual Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco.

We kept an eye on the two-hour presentation so you didn't have to. The highlights:

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Music
3:25 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Apple's Music Streaming Service Smaller Than Anticipated

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 6:11 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Now to another topic in tech. Today, Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference launched in San Francisco. The company made a slew of announcements: new MacBooks, a new operating system, and the most anticipated announcement - Apple's entry into the streaming music market with iTunes Radio. But as NPR's Laura Sydell reports, many analysts are underwhelmed.

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The Salt
2:17 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

A Senate Catfight Over Catfish

These funny mustachioed fish are at the center of a farm bill fight in the House and Senate.
Sasha Radosavljevic iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 4:15 pm

The farm bill is expected to pass in the Senate on Monday night. And to the dismay of some, it likely won't include an amendment that would have eliminated a controversial program to keep a closer eye on a food product you probably weren't even worried about: catfish.

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