Business

Business
3:08 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Data Marketing Critics Check Out What's Written About Them

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 7:34 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Companies that collect and sell information about you are usually pretty secretive about what they have on you. But one of the biggest data brokers is now letting consumers have a peek.

Yesterday, the Acxiom Corp. set up a website where people can look themselves up. It's called AboutTheData.com. As NPR's Martin Kaste reports, some of the first people to try it were the data industry's critics.

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Around the Nation
1:23 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Under Dust And Rust, 'New' Classic Cars Go Up For Auction

Chevrolets are lined up in a field near the Lambrecht Chevrolet dealership in Pierce, Neb. Later this month, bidders will attend a two-day auction that will feature about 500 old cars and trucks, many with fewer than 10 miles on the odometer.
Nati Harnik AP

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 6:11 pm

Inside the Lambrecht Chevrolet Company in tiny Pierce, Neb., under layers of dirt, sit a dozen classic cars. A 1978 Chevrolet Indy Pace Car, black with racing stripes down the side. There's a '66 Bel Air sedan in a color called tropic turquoise, and a 1964 impala.

"If you wipe away the dirt, it's shiny underneath," says auctioneer Yvette VanDerBrink. Even though this car is almost 50 years old, VanDerBrink says, it's still brand new.

Later this month Lambrecht's will auction more than 500 classic cars, many with fewer than 10 miles on the odometer.

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The Two-Way
12:39 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Economy Expanding At Moderate Rate, Fed Says

Doors for a Chevy Sonic hang on the assembly line at General Motors' Orion Assembly Plant in Lake Orion, Michigan, in 2011.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 4:59 pm

The U.S. economy held steady with "modest to moderate" growth between early July and late August, as Americans bought more cars and auto factories ramped up hiring.

The Federal Reserve's so-called Beige Book, comprising reports from 12 geographic districts around the country, showed that manufacturing activity "expanded modestly" and that several districts reported that "demand for inputs related to autos, housing, and infrastructure were strong."

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The Two-Way
12:32 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

S&P Accuses U.S. Of Suing To Retaliate For Credit Downgrade

The Justice Department claims Standard & Poor's knew that billions of dollars of mortgage-backed securities were junk but still gave them positive ratings.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 4:03 pm

In a court filing, Standard & Poor's is accusing the U.S. government of using the Justice Department to retaliate for the agency's decision to downgrade U.S. debt in 2011.

The accusation by S&P was made while it tried to defend itself in a lawsuit filed against it by the U.S. government, which alleges S&P knew that billions of dollars of mortgage-backed securities were junk, but still gave them positive ratings.

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Parallels
10:40 am
Wed September 4, 2013

U.S. Competitiveness Up, Ranking Fifth, Survey Says

As the economy continues its recovery, the World Economic Forum's latest survey said U.S. global competitiveness is up after four years of decline.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 12:44 pm

U.S. competitiveness among global economies suffered after the 2008 global economic crisis. Four years after the crisis, the U.S. slipped in the World Economic Forum's annual competitiveness ranking. This year it's back up a bit: The U.S. rose to fifth position overall from seventh last year, in the forum's latest survey, which was released Wednesday.

Here's what the survey says about the U.S., the world's largest economy:

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The Salt
10:37 am
Wed September 4, 2013

A Greener Way To Cool Your Foods On The Way To The Grocery Store

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 3:13 pm

Your produce and frozen foods could soon arrive at grocery stores in trucks that release fewer emissions. Researchers are developing a clean technology to keep your food cool while it travels.

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All Tech Considered
10:10 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Data Marketers Know What You Bought Last Summer

The online purchases you make help form a data profile that marketers use to sell you more stuff. A new site lets you see what data the marketers have on you.
Matt Cardy Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 2:09 pm

If you've ever wondered just how much marketing companies know about you, whether it's your education or income or purchase preferences, today you can see for yourself.

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Business
4:42 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Latino Buying Power Gets Movie Studios' Attention

Instructions Not Included, a film starring and directed by Eugenio Derbez, was made specifically for a Mexican and U.S. Latino audience.
Pantelion Films

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 9:12 am

One of the surprise movie hits this past weekend was almost entirely in Spanish. Instructions Not Included made an enormous amount of money per screen, more than $22,000, playing in fewer than 350 theaters. The boys in One Direction had the number one film, but they pulled in less than $6000 per screen. That's a huge victory for star Eugenio Derbez, a household name in Mexico, and for Pantelion films, which has been trying to find a Spanish-language hit in the U.S. film market for a few years now.

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Business
2:46 am
Wed September 4, 2013

British Airways Adds Nonstop Flight To Austin

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 4:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with non-stop flights.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: British Airways has announced a new non-stop service five days a week between London and Austin, Texas. The move comes as something of a surprise, considering the airline already serves Dallas and Houston.

From member station KUT, David Brown reports.

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Around the Nation
2:46 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Las Vegas Gambles On Unique Business Incubator

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 9:12 am

The Downtown Container Park will set up budding entrepreneurs in repurposed shipping containers. The park will have 35 containers and a bunch of modular cubes like you'd normally see at a construction site — all to house local businesses.

Business
2:46 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Hawaii Tries To Get Off Oil In Favor Of Natural Gas

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 4:42 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's take a journey in the other direction - across the Pacific to Hawaii, where 15 percent of the energy comes from renewable sources. That's an impressive number. But the rest comes mostly from pricey oil imports. Several energy alternatives are being explored. A top contender is natural gas. But some worry that effort could derail the state's green energy momentum.

From Honolulu, Joe Rubin reports.

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NPR Story
2:40 am
Wed September 4, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 4:42 am

Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne have the Last Word in business.

Shots - Health News
1:43 am
Wed September 4, 2013

For Hospital Patients, Observation Status Can Prove Costly

The next bed could cost you a lot if the hospital says you're there on observation.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 7:25 am

If you're on Medicare and you're in the hospital for a few days, you may think you're an inpatient. The hospital may have other ideas. Increasingly, hospitals are placing older patients on "observation status." They may be there for days, but technically they're still outpatients.

This is a big deal for someone on Medicare because follow-up treatment in a nursing home isn't covered unless someone has been an inpatient for at least three days. That's leaving some seniors on the hook for thousands of dollars in nursing home bills.

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Law
1:34 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Is It Legal For Undocumented Immigrant To Practice Law?

Sergio Garcia speaks at The Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA) news conference on Aug. 27. Garcia, 36, is a law school graduate who passed California's bar examination, but he's living in the United States illegally. California State Bar officials have not issued him a lawyer's license because of his immigration status.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 1:44 pm

On Wednesday, the California Supreme Court holds oral arguments in a case that will determine whether Sergio Garcia, an undocumented immigrant, can become a licensed attorney.

The case has drawn attention from legal groups across the country and comes amid the larger national fight over immigration reform.

On the side of Garcia are the State Bar of California and the California attorney general. Opposing his admission to the bar is the Justice Department, among others.

'This Is The Country I Know'

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The Salt
1:05 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Small Farmers In New England Fear New Food Safety Rules

Joe Buley owns Screamin' Ridge Farm in Montpelier, Vt. He says the FDA's new food safety rules threaten the viability of small New England farm operations like his. Here, Buley harvests cucumbers.
Emily Corwin

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 4:42 am

Back in January, the Food and Drug Administration issued two proposed food safety rules to prevent tainted food from entering the food supply.

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Business
3:28 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Spirit Airlines Sees Business Take Off With Raunchy Ads

Spirit Airlines has gotten notice — and criticism — for its racy ads.
Courtesy of Spirit Airlines

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:22 pm

South Florida-based Spirit Airlines is known for being cheap. It boasts "ultralow" base fares and then charges for items such as carry-on luggage or printing out your boarding pass at the airport.

That thrift carries over to Spirit's advertising. Even compared with other low-cost airlines, Spirit spends almost nothing on ads. And yet the company makes a surprising splash with its campaigns. A visit to Spirit headquarters reveals the secrets of its marketing.

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Business
3:04 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Microsoft Takes A Gamble On Nokia, And Its CEO

Only days after Steve Ballmer said he's retiring, Microsoft moved swiftly to acquire Nokia's mobile phone business. The deal signals that Microsoft is committed to a future that relies on mobile devices at least as much as software. Whether that bet succeeds will depend largely on Stephen Elop, Nokia's CEO, who is returning to Microsoft and is being discussed as Ballmer's potential successor.

The Salt
1:16 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Now A Test Can Tell If Your Pricey Cup Of Cat Poop Coffee Is Fake

A civet cat eats red coffee cherries at a farm in Bondowoso, Indonesia. Civets are actually more closely related to meerkats and mongooses than to cats.
Ulet Ifansasti Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 11:25 am

From gross to gourmet. That pretty much sums up civet poop coffee.

The beans are literally harvested from the feces of the tree-dwelling civet cat in Indonesia. The idea is that a trip through the animal's digestive tract partially ferments the beans and imparts a much-sought-after flavor to the coffee.

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Planet Money
10:19 am
Tue September 3, 2013

The Nobel Laureate Who Figured Out How To Deal With Annoying People

"I've been wrong so often I don't find it extraordinary at all," Ronald Coase told us last year.
University of Chicago

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:22 pm

Update, Sept. 4: We added the audio for David Kestenbaum's radio obituary of Ronald Coase.

If you created the world as a simple economic thought experiment, companies wouldn't exist. Instead, everybody would work for themselves, and they'd be constantly selling their labor (or the fruits of their labor, or use of their tools, or whatever) to the highest bidder. Wages would rise and fall every day (every hour! every second!) depending on supply and demand. That's how the market works, after all.

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Money Coach
10:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Managing Money: There's An App For That

An endless number of personal finance apps help consumers keep track of their money. Host Michel Martin speaks with Lisa Gerstner of Kiplinger's Personal Finance, about the different options for tracking savings and spending on mobile devices.

Technology
9:57 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Software Helps Keep Your Shopping In Check

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Continuing our conversation about personal finance, we just talked about apps like Mint and how people are using them to keep tabs on their personal finances, but Omar Green and his new software company want to take it even further to help you make good decisions about your money. And let's just say you might not need to call mom quite so often. We'll let him explain. Omar Green is the CEO and cofounder of wallet.AI and he's with us now to tell us more. Welcome, thanks so much for joining us.

OMAR GREEN: Thanks for having me.

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Economy
9:57 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Syria: The Money Effect

The uncertain future of American military action in Syria is causing ripple effects in the world market. Host Michel Martin speaks with economic reporter Sudeep Reddy of The Wall Street Journal, about the relationship between the Syrian conflict and oil.

The Two-Way
5:23 am
Tue September 3, 2013

For Microsoft, Nokia's Phones Are 'Key To Everything'

That's a Nokia Lumia 820 smartphone snapping an image of a Windows icon.
Dado Ruvic Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:52 am

Here's why Microsoft says its $7.2 billion deal to buy Nokia's smartphone business as well as that company's patents and services makes sense.

"It all starts with the phone," writes PCWorld, in a piece that analyzes why "the phone is key to everything."

According to the magazine:

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Business
3:29 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Will Microsoft's Nokia Deal Shake Up Mobile?

Nokia was the only large phone manufacturer in the world to commit to selling phones running Microsoft's operating system. Now Microsoft is buying Nokia's mobile phone business.
Timothy Clary AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 11:30 am

Nokia was once the largest mobile phone manufacturer in the world, the most valuable company in Europe and an icon in its home base of Finland. But the rise of Apple and Android smartphones knocked the company on its heels.

Now comes news that Microsoft is buying Nokia's mobile phone business for $7.2 billion. NPR's Steve Henn answers some questions about the deal.

So what is Microsoft getting here?

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Business
3:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Verizon Buys Out Vodafone To Acquire Wireless Company

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 8:54 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR News business news starts with Verizon in total control.

At least for the wireless network. Yesterday, we told you Verizon was on the way to approving one of the biggest deals in the history of the telecommunications business. And now we can tell you the deal is sealed. The company will pay $130 billion in cash and stock to the British company Vodafone to acquire Vodafone's share of their joint wireless venture.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

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Business
3:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Lava Lamp Turns 50

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 8:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK. Our last word in business has to be said just the right way. The word is: Groovy. But you have to say it this way - groovy baby.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Groovy...

(LAUGHTER)

MONTAGNE: ...baby. Well, in the '60s, the grooviest thing around was the Lava Lamp. And we're mentioning it just now because it turns 50 today.

INSKEEP: Groovy. The fluorescent lamp, with its hypnotic moving liquid blob center, helped to define the psychedelic era. It first hit stores in Britain on this day in 1963.

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Business
3:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

New York's Dairy Farmers Squeezed By Greek Yogurt Boom

The recent yogurt boom of upstate New York has meant more jobs in places like the Chobani plant in South Edmeston, but it has not led to a bigger dairy herd in the state.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 12:01 pm

Upstate New York has lugged around the Rust Belt identity for decades now.
But today, the region is trying on a new reputation as the king of yogurt — especially the high-protein Greek yogurt that consumers crave.

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The Two-Way
4:23 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Time Warner And CBS Reach Deal To End Programming Blackout

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 8:07 am

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Around the Nation
2:45 am
Mon September 2, 2013

In Maine, Even With A GPS, You Can't Get There From Here

If you're planning that last summer road trip, you might want to pull those maps out of the attic.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 8:58 am

Once a standard fixture at every gas station, good old fashioned paper maps have all but folded in the digital age. But, there are places that can baffle your high tech gadgets.

Getting yourself lost in a rural state is an easy thing to do. Pavement turns into dirt track, and before you know it, you're driving through miles of woods and boulders, and your GPS isn't helping.

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Business
2:45 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Verizon Poised To Gain Full Control Of Wireless Business

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 4:32 am

Verizon and Vodafone are joint owners of the nation's No. 1 wireless provider Verizon Wireless. Over the weekend, the two companies were in talks to finalize the terms of a $130 billion deal. That's how much Vodafone is asking for its 45 percent stake in the company.

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