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Coder boot camps. Accelerated learning programs. New economy skills training.

Whatever you call them, these new players in higher education are multiplying. The intensive programs say they can teach job-ready skills in technology, design and related fields. In record time.

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Is news coverage of Greece wearing you down? Too many deals and deadlines?

It's no wonder. The "Greek debt crisis" has been in progress for nearly six years, making it easy to assume that we're seeing just another crazy episode in a long-running drama.

But European leaders are saying this time it really is different. Here's why:

This spring, Fiat Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne fired off an email to the CEO of another major automaker, General Motors' Mary Barra, asking her to consider a merger between his company and hers.

Publicly, GM politely declined the opportunity. Now, Marchionne is trying to get investors to force a shotgun wedding.

Michael Ward, an investment analyst with Sterne Agee, says the answer is a no-brainer.

"Chrysler merger with GM makes absolutely no sense," he says. "Zero sense."

In a Monday speech, Hillary Clinton focused on a trend that millions of Americans know all too intimately: declining incomes.

The Clinton campaign is calling the phenomenon of stagnant wages "the defining economic challenge of our time," and as debates and primaries draw ever closer, it's becoming clear that jump-starting Americans' wages is going to be the defining challenge of the election. Candidates are furiously trying to differentiate themselves on how to deal with unstoppable phenomena.

A Recent, Scary Problem

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The chief executive officer of Nintendo has died. As NPR's Laura Sydell reports, Satoru Iwata was known for his accessibility to fans, and he's being remembered for a playfulness unusual among big company CEOs.

Concerns over the safety of drivers and passengers has prompted Land Rover to issue a recall of more than 65,000 recently made SUVs. The problem stems from keyless entry software that can allow seemingly latched doors to open.

"Some customers have reported that one door has opened while the vehicle was in motion," the company said in an initial report on the flaw in June.

Silicon Valley admits it has a diversity problem. Companies from Google to Facebook to Twitter have reported that a majority of their employees are white males.

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In a news conference early Monday morning, eurozone leaders announced that they would give Greece another bailout — as long as the government of Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras manages to implement a round of austerity measures in the coming days, says European Council President Donald Tusk.

The new deal estimates that Greece will need up to $96 billion in emergency funding in the next three years, Jake Cigainero reports for NPR. Lawmakers in Athens by Wednesday will need to pass pension overhauls and sales-tax increases that voters overwhelmingly rejected in a recent referendum.

Two years ago, in the middle of the night, a fire broke out in a commercial building on the northern edge of the city of Dallas. It destroyed a small yogurt company called Three Happy Cows.

Two months later, Edgar Diaz, the founder of Three Happy Cows, confessed that he'd set the fire. Yet people who knew Diaz, and had worked with him, could not believe it.

"I was like, Edgar did that? No way! No way. No way," says Ruth Cruz, who worked at Three Happy Cows.

"No. No. It was his baby. Couldn't imagine," says Don Seale, who supplied milk to the factory.

Nintendo Chief Satoru Iwata Dies At 55

Jul 12, 2015

Satoru Iwata, the president and CEO of Nintendo for more than a decade, has died at the age of 55.

"Nintendo Co., Ltd. deeply regrets to announce that President Satoru Iwata passed away on July 11, 2015 due to a bile duct growth," the video game company announced Sunday night in a very brief statement.

In 1872, Victoria Claflin Woodhull became the first woman to run for president — before women even had the right to vote.

Campaigning as a member of the Equal Rights Party on a platform of women's suffrage and labor reforms, the election came and went without Woodhull receiving any electoral votes, but Woodhull became the first of a small club of women who have run for the United States' highest office.

Matthew Rearley plays Minecraft every day, sometimes for eight hours at a time, but he's never gamed like this before. In a movie theater full of competitors, the 15-year-old's eyes shift constantly between the computer in his lap and the 50-foot-tall screen in front of him.

"Gaming with other people, it becomes more professional," Rearley says. "The general experience of having the big screen there and sitting in a chair like this — it's a big, big game-changer."

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Updated at 6:35 p.m. ET

Eurozone finance ministers met Saturday to decide if they will bail Greece out for a third time since 2010, but the meetings wrapped up with no announced decision. The ministers remain skeptical that Athens would live up to the terms of any fresh agreement.

Talks are scheduled to resume Sunday.

After a nerve-rattling plunge, stocks in Asia, Europe and the United States managed to end the week ahead of where they started.

But not so for industrial commodities. Their prices just keep heading south — creating more worries for miners, but good news for many manufacturers and consumers. The price drops could even help depress interest rates for all sorts of borrowers.

Before considering the impacts, first check out the magnitude of the changes. These are approximate prices, compared with one year ago:

  • Copper: $2.55 a pound, down from $3.27

Updated at 7:14 p.m. ET

Reddit interim CEO Ellen Pao has resigned from the company in the wake of an insurrection last week in which moderators shut down many of the site's most popular sections following the still-unexplained dismissal of a popular figure in the site's r/IAmA section.

Food companies the world over are paying close attention to the groundswell of support for food transparency, the "know where your food comes from" movement.

JBS, the largest meat producer in the world, is beginning to take notice as well.

But executives with JBS USA, the North American arm of its Brazilian parent company, at the same time acknowledge that the very nature of their business is grisly, gory and sometimes unpalatable.

Oil prices have further to fall before bottoming out amid a surge in production, mainly by OPEC nations, and a weakening of global demand, according to the International Energy Agency's latest forecast.

In the second quarter of 2015, the world's supply of oil was 96.39 million barrels a day, outstripping demand of 93.13 million barrels a day, according to the IEA's Oil Market Report, which described the world oil market as "massively oversupplied."

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Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras was trying to sell a bailout proposal at home on Friday while creditors reviewed the text abroad.

According to The Guardian, Tsipras called a meeting with his ruling coalition in Athens.

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You wouldn't expect to pay a local tax when you stream a movie on Netflix, but Chicago has decided that such cloud-based services should be taxed just like tickets for live entertainment.

There was no debate or public hearing over the city's "cloud tax" — a 9 percent tax on streaming entertainment like Netflix and Spotify.

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Government audits just released as the result of a lawsuit detail widespread billing errors in private Medicare Advantage health plans going back years, including overpayments of thousands of dollars a year for some patients.

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