Business

Around the Nation
2:05 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Some In Irwindale Still Not Happy About Smelly Neighbor, Sriracha

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:26 pm

The skirmish continues between Sriracha and Irwindale, Calif. Irwindale's city council declared that owner David Tran must curb his hot sauce factory's smelly fumes or they'll do it themselves. Tran is considering relocating, and he has already received several offers.

Law
2:05 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Anti-Poaching Agreements May Implicate Several Tech Titans

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:26 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. A court case in Silicon Valley has brought some juicy emails to light. The correspondence involved some of the valley's biggest stars including the late Apple founder and CEO, Steve Jobs. Apple, Google, Intel and Adobe are accused in a class action suit of suppressing the wages of their developers and engineers.

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Digital Life
10:27 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Security Threats Hit Deeper Than Heartbleed Bug

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. You might have been hearing about the Heart Bleed bug over the past couple weeks. And if you haven't, you might want to check it out. It's important. That is the security flaw the researchers say could have compromised up to half a million websites. So maybe you changed your passwords for your online accounts by now.

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Around the Nation
10:27 am
Mon April 21, 2014

No Longer Marching Out To Work, More Mothers Stay Home

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 1:24 pm

A growing number of American mothers are staying home to raise their children, according to a new report from the Pew Research Center. Listeners share their own stories about making that choice.

Education
10:27 am
Mon April 21, 2014

A 'Tennessee Promise' To Educate The State's College Students

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. This spring, along with NPR's Morning Edition, we're helping you navigate the higher education money maze with our "Paying for College" series.

We've heard about how college got so expensive and how families and students are taking on massive loans to pay for it. But today, we want to talk more about an effort to make college not just affordable, but free.

(SOUNDBITE OF STATE OF THE STATE ADDRESS)

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Economy
10:27 am
Mon April 21, 2014

President Obama Will Skip China, But Asia Trip Sends A Message

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. President Obama heads overseas this week to Asia. He hopes to strengthen U.S. economic ties with that region.

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Business
5:53 am
Mon April 21, 2014

GM To Boost Car Production In China

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts on the road in China.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: The Beijing Auto Show is underway and among the big announcements is this: General Motors says it will boost its production in China. GM said yesterday it will be able to produce five million cars per year by the end of 2015. It sold just over three million vehicles in China last year.

Business
5:08 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Honda Introduces Asimo To North America

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

Asimo is Honda's latest humanoid robot. This one, the third version, is more life-like than previous models.

Business
3:20 am
Mon April 21, 2014

U.S. Supreme Court To Hear Arguments In Argentina Debt Case

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Argentina and its teetering economy will be affected by case being heard today by the U.S. Supreme Court. The case goes back more than a decade and could have wide implications, not just for Argentina's economy, but also to relations with the U.S.

NPR's Laura Sydell reports.

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NPR Story
3:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Powdered Alcohol Approved By The Feds

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

Palchohol is powdered alcohol — just mix with water to create an instant cocktail. The creators of Palcohol pitched their idea as a solution to the soaring price of alcohol.

All Tech Considered
1:44 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Who Should Pay To Keep The Internet's Locks Secure?

A lock icon signifies an encrypted Internet connection. But thanks to a recently discovered (and now fixed) bug, it's been bleeding out information for a few years.
Mal Langsdon Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 11:01 am

The encryption code unlocked by the Heartbleed bug last week provided vital security for some of the most widely used websites on the Internet. Fortune 1000 companies rely on the open source code for their core business. But it turns out no one is paying for it.

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Your Money
1:42 am
Mon April 21, 2014

How Do Companies Boost 401(k) Enrollment? Make It Automatic

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 12:15 pm

More Americans are saving for retirement through their employers' 401(k) programs. That's because in recent years they've been given a strong nudge — more companies are automatically enrolling workers in retirement savings programs.

Some firms are also automatically increasing the amount employees contribute. That's just as important, experts say.

And all of this makes a big difference: Without it, millions of Americans don't save at all.

Making Time For Retirement Planning

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Shots - Health News
1:40 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Scribes Are Back, Helping Doctors Tackle Electronic Medical Records

Medical scribe Connie Gayton keeps the electronic records, allowing orthopedic surgeon Devesh Ramnath to focus on his patients.
Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 7:43 am

Like many other doctors across the country, Dr. Devesh Ramnath, a Dallas orthopedic surgeon, recently made the switch from paper to electronic medical records. This meant he no longer had to just take notes when he was examining a patient — he also had to put those notes into the computer as a permanent record.

"I was really focused on just trying to get the information in, and not really focusing on the patient anymore," Ramnath says.

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The Changing Lives Of Women
3:12 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Advice From Women About Negotiating For A Raise: Just Ask

Many of the women who told us their stories said they didn't negotiate terms for their first job offers because they didn't know they could.
Thomas Barwick Getty Images

Twice Juno Schaser asked for a raise. Twice she was turned down, she says. If her group of female friends is any indication, it's a common experience.

" 'At least they'll respect you for trying,' " a friend told Schaser, a 23-year-old museum publicist.

"I think I'd feel more respected if I was paid at the same level as my male co-workers," Schaser says.

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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Sat April 19, 2014

GM Was Slow To Recall Saturn Cars With Steering Flaw

Workers carry out a final inspection of a Saturn Ion at a GM plant in 2004. The model is at the center of a new safety recall over power steering problems.
Mark Humphrey AP

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 8:13 am

General Motors delayed a safety recall of more than 330,000 Saturn cars that have been found to have defective power steering systems, newly released federal documents show. The records also show federal regulators didn't demand a recall of the cars, despite thousands of complaints about them.

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Code Switch
6:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

In Silicon Valley, Immigrants Toast Their Way To The Top

Engineer Mit Shah gives a speech at a meeting of the "ArtICCulators" Toastmasters Club in Milpitas, Calif.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 10:18 am

Public speaking can be nerve-wracking whatever your native tongue. It can be especially difficult for immigrants who speak English as a second language.

In California's Silicon Valley, some immigrant tech workers strengthen their voices by joining public speaking support groups like Toastmasters clubs.

Members usually meet once a week to practice giving speeches, which are timed to the second and judged for grammar and presentation. There's even a designated counter of ums and ahs.

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Television
6:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Critics: Hollywood Tax Deals A 'House Of Cards' For Local Economies

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 8:12 am

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

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All Tech Considered
3:08 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Tech Week: Earnings, A Heartbleed Arrest And Digital Distraction

Google and other tech companies reported earnings this week, amid fears of another tech bubble bursting.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

There was really only one tech story last week — the potentially disastrous Heartbleed bug. This week, we return to more of a panoply of tech-related news, starting with NPR stories in the ICYMI section, the broader topics in the industry in The Big Conversation and fun links you shouldn't miss in Curiosities.

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The Salt
3:07 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Can Wal-Mart Really Make Organic Food Cheap For Everyone?

Wal-Mart is promising to drive down the prices of organic food by bringing in a new company, WildOats, to deliver a whole range of additional products.
Wal-Mart/Flickr

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

It could be another milestone in organic food's evolution from crunchy to commercial: Wal-Mart, the king of mass retailing, is promising to "drive down organic food prices" with a new line of organic food products. The new products will be at least 25 percent cheaper than organic food that's on Wal-Mart's shelves right now.

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All Tech Considered
3:01 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Airbnb To Start Charging Hotel Taxes In A Handful Of Cities

Airbnb, the online home-rental service, says it will start collecting hotel taxes in a few American cities.
Chris Weeks Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:13 pm

When Regitze Visby, a tourist visiting San Francisco from Denmark, searched for accommodations for her trip and saw she could stay at one of the famed "painted ladies" on Alamo Square through Airbnb, she took it.

At $135 a night, "it was a good deal," she says.

But does she know if she's paying a transient occupancy tax or a hotel tax? "I have no idea," she says.

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Media
2:08 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

There Is A Media Slant, And Readers Might Be Responsible

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:13 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish. Your favorite newspaper has a political slant, thanks to you, the reader. That's the finding of University of Chicago economist Matthew Gentzkow. His work measuring media slant has in part won him this year's John Bates Clark Medal. The prestigious honor from the American Economic Association is given to the country's most promising economist under the age of 40.

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The Two-Way
1:58 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Keystone XL Pipeline Review Extended By State Department

A TransCanada Keystone Pipeline pump station operates outside Steele City, Neb. The State Department is extending the review period for the pipeline, given ongoing litigation in Nebraska over the project.
Lane Hickenbottom Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 6:58 am

  • Tamara Keith's Report For 'All Things Considered'
This post was updated at 6 p.m. ET.

The State Department is giving federal agencies more time to review the Keystone XL Pipeline project. The additional time was given "based on the uncertainty created" by an ongoing legal battle in Nebraska, according to a State Department statement.

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Faith Matters
9:58 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Gefilte Fish Shortage: Best Thing Since The Parting Of The Red Sea?

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 10:35 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Speaking of religion still, if there's one thing that goes hand-in-hand with faith, it is generally food. There have been a number of different food shortages in this country you may have heard about lately. We reported on this program about the shortage of limes. We've seen reports of rising beef prices as well. But right now, during Passover, gefilte fish is in short supply. Matt Chaban joins us now from member station WESA in Pittsburgh. He wrote about this for the New York Times. Matt, welcome.

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Business
9:10 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Wal-Mart To Offer Money-Transfer Service

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with wiring from Wal-Mart.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: The giant retailer is taking another step into banking. The company says it's launching a money transfer service next week. It'll go head-to-head with Western Union and MoneyGram in a market worth about $900 billion. But Wal-Mart says it will offer lower fees. Western Union and MoneyGram's stock both dropped on the news. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Business
4:40 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Obama Wants To Sell Exports To Asia, But Critics Aren't Buying

Members of Japan's farmers association protest against the Trans-Pacific Partnership free-trade talks at a rally in Tokyo in March 2013.
Yoshikazu Tsuno AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 12:00 pm

Next week, President Obama is going to Asia, where he'll talk up a proposed deal to increase U.S. trade with that region.

If he succeeds, he could open up huge new markets for U.S. farmers and manufacturers, strengthen U.S. influence in Asia and set a path to greater prosperity.

At least, that's what the White House says.

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Business
4:25 am
Fri April 18, 2014

'Leftover Women' Blamed For China's Surplus Of Unmarried Men

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 10:57 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

In China there's a phrase that refers to a certain demographic: Educated professional women in their late 20s or a little older who are still single. They're called Leftover Women.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: This group of women is growing rapidly in the cities. They're facing an unprecedented unmarried crisis.

MCEVERS: An unmarried crisis. That's from Chinese state TV. Newspapers also use the phrase, which was coined by the government a few years back. Sociologist Leta Hong Fincher tracks how Leftover Women is used in the media.

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Business
4:23 am
Fri April 18, 2014

IPO Market Shows Signs Of Strain

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

All right, Virtu Financial has reportedly decided to postpone its initial public offering. The decision comes during a week when several IPOs in U.S. markets had disappointing debuts. Virtu conducts high-frequency electronic trading on various exchanges and scrutiny of high-speed trading is growing.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

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NPR Story
3:09 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Budget Cuts Threaten Mock Villages At Military Training Center

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

America has learned a lot about fighting wars over the past decade. And you can see how they apply the lessons learned at the Fort Irwin National Training Center in Southern California. The military still holds old-style war games there, with tanks and planes. But the war scenarios also reflect the recent challenges faced in places like Iraq and Afghanistan.

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NPR Story
3:09 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Plunge In Circulation Forces Changes At Japanese Magazine

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: Wonderful Wife.

It's the name of a women's magazine in Japan. It used to be a top seller back when more women stayed home and took care of their kids.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

But times have changed. As more women work even after having kids, Wonderful Wife has plunged in circulation. So the publisher says it's taking Wonderful Wife off the racks and replacing it with a new magazine aimed at working mothers.

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Law
3:28 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

When Being Pregnant Also Means Being Out Of A Job

While many women continue to work with little change in their duties while pregnant, others find that pregnancy can be a career liability.
Yuri Arcurs iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:06 pm

The workplace has become a more understanding place for pregnant women or new moms these days. Many companies now have lactation rooms and offer more liberal maternity and paternity leave policies than in years past.

But for some women, pregnancy can still be a career liability.

Heather Myers was fresh out of high school and working at a Wal-Mart in Salina, Kan., in 2006 when she found out she was pregnant. She kept a water bottle with her on the sales floor, as her doctor recommended. Then, her supervisor intervened.

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