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Reddit interim CEO Ellen Pao has resigned from the company in the wake of an insurrection last week in which moderators shut down many of the site's most popular sections following the still-unexplained dismissal of a popular figure in the site's r/IAmA section.

Food companies the world over are paying close attention to the groundswell of support for food transparency, the "know where your food comes from" movement.

JBS, the largest meat producer in the world, is beginning to take notice as well.

But executives with JBS USA, the North American arm of its Brazilian parent company, at the same time acknowledge that the very nature of their business is grisly, gory and sometimes unpalatable.

Oil prices have further to fall before bottoming out amid a surge in production, mainly by OPEC nations, and a weakening of global demand, according to the International Energy Agency's latest forecast.

In the second quarter of 2015, the world's supply of oil was 96.39 million barrels a day, outstripping demand of 93.13 million barrels a day, according to the IEA's Oil Market Report, which described the world oil market as "massively oversupplied."

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras was trying to sell a bailout proposal at home on Friday while creditors reviewed the text abroad.

According to The Guardian, Tsipras called a meeting with his ruling coalition in Athens.

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You wouldn't expect to pay a local tax when you stream a movie on Netflix, but Chicago has decided that such cloud-based services should be taxed just like tickets for live entertainment.

There was no debate or public hearing over the city's "cloud tax" — a 9 percent tax on streaming entertainment like Netflix and Spotify.

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Government audits just released as the result of a lawsuit detail widespread billing errors in private Medicare Advantage health plans going back years, including overpayments of thousands of dollars a year for some patients.

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Konstantinos Koutsantonis is 22, a university student who works as a delivery boy to make some extra cash. He considers himself a conservative. He voted "yes" for a bailout deal in last Sunday's referendum because he believes Greece can only reform its economy within the eurozone.

"Some days ago," he says, "when the crisis really exploded and everyone was talking about the referendum and the political news, I had to express my opinion."

He complained on Facebook that the referendum was a bad move because it could be perceived as anti-European.

The New York Stock Exchange says a planned software update caused Wednesday's system shutdown that halted trading for more than 3.5 hours.

In a statement, the NYSE says its problems began Tuesday night with the rollout of a software release. The exchange says that as customers began connecting after 7 a.m. ET on Wednesday, "there were communication issues between customer gateways and the trading unit with the new release."

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The NYSE says it turns out the gateways were "not loaded with the proper configuration compatible with the new release."

Victoria Taylor, famous for her role in Reddit's popular r/IAmA section, has broken the silence over her dismissal that prompted an insurrection last week in which moderators shut down many of the site's most popular sections.

Posting on Reddit, Taylor thanked those who rallied to her defense, calling the response "extraordinary."

All Things Considered, NPR's flagship evening news program, is expanding its lineup of hosts: Ari Shapiro and Kelly McEvers will join veterans Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish on weekdays, and Michel Martin will become the new host of the weekend show.

(This post was last updated at 4:48 p.m. ET.)

Just before the end of the day Thursday in Athens, the Greek government handed its European creditors a new bailout proposal.

A spokesman for Eurogroup President Jeroen Dijsselbloem tweeted that Greece's creditors would now consider the proposal.

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If you're a woman of a certain size, shopping for clothes can be a downer. Even though the average American woman is around a size 14, most department store racks are devoted to smaller bodies.

But that could be changing.

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Each year, convicted felons get thousands of weapons from licensed gun dealers. They skirt the mandatory background checks by having people who do qualify fill out the paperwork for them.

Now, the settlement of a lawsuit over a tragic murder-suicide in Kansas has made it easier to sue gun dealers who allow these "straw purchases" with a wink and a nod.

Over the last decade, economic growth lifted almost a billion people around the world out of extreme poverty. Unfortunately, it didn't lift them very far.

A rising economic tide has been concentrated in just a few regions of the world, and it's failed to raise many people into the middle class.

By U.S. standards, most of the world remains terribly poor.

Over the last few years, Oregon has quietly become something of a center for women willing to carry children for those unable to get pregnant. There are several reasons for that: lenient laws, a critical mass of successful fertility clinics and a system for amending a birth certificate pre-birth.

But surrogacy arrangements are often informal agreements and they can go wrong. A surrogate may face unexpected medical bills, or the intended parents may change their mind.

One of Facebook's iconic logos just got an update. That tiny image that lingers in the corner of most Facebook pages — two small silhouettes of a man and a woman — it will be a little different on Facebook mobile pages starting this week.

JPMorgan Chase will pay $136 million in penalties to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and states to settle charges that it used illegal tactics to target delinquent credit card borrowers.

Here's what the CFPB says Chase did:

"The CFPB and states found that Chase sold 'zombie debts' to third-party debt buyers, which include accounts that were inaccurate, settled, discharged in bankruptcy, not owed, or otherwise not collectible."

Wednesday's computer-related problems on the New York Stock Exchange that halted trading for more than three hours was not a one-off.

The greeting card industry is struggling to stay relevant in the digital age.

Hallmark has announced that it's closing its distribution center in Enfield, Conn., and cutting 570 jobs there, as it consolidates operations elsewhere.

For decades, the greeting card maker held a reputation as the type of company where good employees had a job for life.

Julie Elliott, Hallmark's PR director, says layoffs, like the ones announced this week, are especially painful.

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Microsoft is cutting up to 7,800 jobs. That's nearly 7 percent of its workforce, and it's mostly from the company's smartphone business. NPR's Aarti Shahani reports.

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