Arts

Arts & Life
5:58 am
Sat October 5, 2013

At 300, Encyclopedia Pioneer May Yet Get A Hero's Burial

Denis Diderot's work on the Encyclopédie faced stiff resistance in its time, but some scholars credit it with laying the foundations of the French Revolution.
Louis-Michel con Loo Diderot Collection/Gift of M. de Vandeul to the French State in 1911

Originally published on Sat October 5, 2013 9:11 am

Before there was Wikipedia, there were encyclopedias — and Saturday marks the 300th birthday of the father of one of the world's most important.

Eighteenth-century French philosopher Denis Diderot was the driving force behind the Encyclopédie, one of the first compendiums of human knowledge of its time. The anniversary of his birth has prompted calls for Diderot to receive France's highest honor: have his remains reinterred in Paris' Pantheon, a mausoleum of sorts for France's national heroes.

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Author Interviews
4:07 am
Sat October 5, 2013

40 Years Ago, 'Fear Of Flying' Showed Women Like Sex, Too

Courtesy of Henry Holt and Co.

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 7:31 am

In 1973, Erica Jong was tired of reading about silent, seething housewifes, so she introduced a new kind of female protagonist: a frank young woman who loved sex and wasn't ashamed to admit it. Fear of Flying turns 40 this year, as does its most famous phrase: "the zipless f - - - ." Jong defines it in the novel:

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
4:36 pm
Fri October 4, 2013

Not My Job: Shirley Jones Gets Quizzed On Partridge Shooting

Originally published on Sat October 5, 2013 9:04 am

Shirley Jones starred in some of the great movie musicals of the 1950s — Oklahoma, Carousel, The Music Man -- won an Oscar for her role in the film Elmer Gantry and then went on to be the mother in the classic sitcom The Partridge Family. She's just written a new memoir about her life onstage, on-screen and behind the scenes.

We've invited Jones to play a game called "Look, it's the partridge family! GET THEM!" Three questions about the sport of partridge shooting.

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Shots - Health News
3:24 pm
Fri October 4, 2013

Want To Read Others' Thoughts? Try Reading Literary Fiction

Would time spent with Anton Chekov, famed for his subtle, flawed characters, make you a better judge of human nature?
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 7:33 am

Your ability to "read" the thoughts and feelings of others could be affected by the kind of fiction you read.

That's the conclusion of a study in the journal Science that gave tests of social perception to people who were randomly assigned to read excerpts from literary fiction, popular fiction or nonfiction.

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Books News & Features
2:05 pm
Fri October 4, 2013

New E-Book Lending Service Aims To Be Netflix For Books

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 3:24 pm

Movie lovers have Netflix, music lovers have Spotify — and book lovers (whether they read literary fiction or best-selling potboilers) now have Scribd. The document sharing website has been around since 2007, but this week it launched a subscription service for e-book lending.

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Movie Interviews
1:35 pm
Fri October 4, 2013

Sandra Bullock, Boxed In On The Set Of 'Gravity'

Many of the special effects in the action-adventure film Gravity were generated by computers — but star Sandra Bullock also had to put in a good deal of work, with choreographed movements simulating weightlessness.
Warner Bros.

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 3:24 pm

The eye-popping new movie Gravity will make you very grateful you're planted on terra firma. It's a thriller directed by Alfonso Cuaron, in which shuttle astronauts on a spacewalk are stranded after a collision with a vast cloud of space debris.

And one of those astronauts — played by Sandra Bullock — is left on her own, hundreds of miles above Earth. She's running out of oxygen and tumbling untethered through the void of space.

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Movie Reviews
11:58 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Houston, We Have A Space Flick: A Sentimental Mission In Zero 'Gravity'

In Alfonso Cuaron's Gravity, Sandra Bullock plays Ryan Stone, an astronaut careening through space after an accident.
Warner Bros.

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 12:51 pm

In a season in which we're all talking about AMC's phenomenal Breaking Bad and Netflix's elating Orange Is the New Black, Hollywood needs you, your kids and everyone in Europe and China to get out from behind those TV monitors and into theaters. Movie studios are falling behind on compelling narratives. But they can give you what TV can't: absolute, total bombardment.

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The Salt
11:30 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Meat-Drenched Oktoberfest Warms To Vegans

Traditional fare at Bavarian Oktoberfest is heavy on meat, but that's changing as restaurants add more vegan and vegetarian options.
Wolfworld Flickr

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 2:22 pm

Oktoberfest, one of the world's largest festivals, is mostly about beer. And to soak up all that froth and alcohol, Bavarians have traditionally reached for meat.

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Monkey See
10:49 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Clip Job: 'Five Dances,' One Sweetly Moving Romance

Ryan Steele in Five Dances
Paladin

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 2:10 pm

Five Dances might be the least talky movie I've seen in months — but it's plenty expressive. What it says, it says silently, or at least nonverbally, in the music-and-movement language of Jonah Bokaer's haunting choreography, which speaks of solitary strivings and the brief, passionate connections that punctuate them.

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Code Switch
10:16 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Actors With Disabilities In Big Roles? 'We Don't Have A Chance'

The original Ironside starred Raymond Burr as a detective who became a paraplegic after being shot in the line of duty.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 4:19 pm

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Barbershop
9:37 am
Fri October 4, 2013

New York Road Rage Video Raises Difficult Questions

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Movies
9:37 am
Fri October 4, 2013

'The Fade': Four Barbers, Three Continents, One Film

London barber Faisal Abdu'Allah cuts director Andy Mundy-Castle's hair.
Big Bright Films

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 6:35 am

The Fade — a documentary by London filmmaker Andy Mundy-Castle — follows the lives of four barbers on three continents, all at the top of their game. New Jersey barber Johnny Castellanos also known as 'Hollywood' is a barber to the stars. His client list includes rapper and businessman Jay Z and artists and athletes like Pharrell Williams and Amar'e Stoudemire.

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Monkey See
8:38 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'Breaking Bad,' Bad Boys, Bad Choices

This guy and his dog are doing all they can to contribute to the world of Grand Theft Auto V.
AP
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

First things first: FEAR NOT. This is a non-spoilery Breaking Bad discussion. If you don't believe me, consider that even two of the people in the room haven't seen the whole run of the series, so if there were spoilers, we'd know (and get punched). Instead, we try to put the themes of the series in the context of a bigger discussion about what kinds of protagonists we can and cannot root for, what kinds of television are growing and shrinking, and what kinds of conversations we want to have about the shows we love.

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The Two-Way
5:36 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Book News: Study Says Reading (Literary) Fiction Can Boost Social Skills

Jesmyn Ward won the 2011 National Book Award for Fiction for her book Salvage the Bones.
Tina Fineberg AP

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 9:33 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Arts & Life
3:06 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Parents Of Child Prodigies Face Difficult Choices

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 8:36 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This week on the program, we've been talking to and about prodigies: children with extraordinary abilities far beyond their age. Yesterday, we talked about how hard it is to find the right balance, encouraging these kids without setting expectations too high, something that can hurt them later as adults. This is largely up to their parents, who face some incredibly difficult choices. And today we'll hear from two parents: the mother of a teenage computer wonder and the father of a pint-sized tennis phenom.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Books
1:06 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Rick Najera: A Latino In Hollywood Is 'Almost White'

Omar 'Yogi' Torres Courtesy of Shabazz Communications, Inc.

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 8:32 am

Rick Najera doesn't remember his wife Susie dialing 9-1-1. She came home six hours after Najera had taken a fall that left him bleeding on the floor of his home. The Hollywood actor/writer/producer had pneumonia and ended up in an intensive care unit in a coma.

Rick Najera told NPR's Michel Martin that his near-death experience caused him to reflect.

"I really looked at my life and I said I wanted to chronicle it. I wanted to bring it down and talk about it in a very human, honest way," he says.

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The Salt
10:12 am
Thu October 3, 2013

How's The Sausage Made? These Folks Really Want To Share The Knowledge

Brent Gentry of Underground Meats rotates a coppa. Underground Meats is behind a new project that aims to lower the barrier to entry for would-be artisanal meat producers by making it easier for them to craft food safety plans.
Emily Julka Courtesy of Underground Meats

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 11:45 am

With the current bloom of artisanal small-batch producers across the country, you'd think that all you need to start up a new food business is a good idea and a lot of gumption. And for the most part, that's true. But when it comes to artisanal producers working with meat, you also need something else: a Hazards Analysis and Critical Control Points plan. Or, if you will, a HACCP.

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Remembrances
10:03 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Remembering Tom Clancy, 'Faulkner In A Flak Jacket'

Tom Clancy poses next to a tank in his Maryland backyard. Though he never served in the military, his books were renowned for their detail.
AP

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 1:23 pm

The Army rejected him because of his bad eyes — he was nearsighted — but Tom Clancy, who went into the family insurance business instead of the military, turned out to have the greatest vision of modern warfare of any writer of our time. His research into military history and technology led him to create a new form of thriller, and a hero for our time, a man named Jack Ryan whose talents as a spy and technowarrior put a name and a face to the people who battled Russians, Pakistanis, Irish nationalists and Islamists along a constantly shifting front line.

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The Protojournalist
9:32 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Things Are Getting Ugly

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 9:41 am

Ugly is everywhere. There are Ugly Dog pageants, Ugly Sweater sites and Ugly Sofa contests. Taking Ugly-Faced selfies is an online phenomenon. Could ugly be the new beautiful?

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Monkey See
7:40 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Fitz That Time Again: The Consolidated Rules Of 'Scandal'

Kerry Washington (Emmy nominee!) plays Olivia Pope on Scandal.
Danny Feld ABC

Scandal returns Thursday night on ABC after two seasons of delicious, ridiculous, addictive total nonsense that made it a pop-culture preoccupation. (OK, obsession. But hey, we can quit any time we want.)

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu October 3, 2013

'Darling' Makes Unfussy Peace With Religion And Sexuality

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 8:55 am

Richard Rodriguez begins his latest book, Darling, with an unfussy dedication to the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas, a Catholic women's group committed to helping the sick and destitute. This Baptism, if you will, is the first and surely the most straightforward indication within the book that Rodriguez intends to delve into his complex relationship with religion. The path that lies beyond that dedication is weird and wonderful, and readers will find that it's far from a direct route.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu October 3, 2013

'The Rosie Project' Will Charm You With Science

Promo image
iStockphoto.com

He's a socially inept scientist who's tone deaf to irony. She's an edgy young woman whose fallback mode is sarcasm. Put them together, and hilarity ensues in Australian IT consultant Graeme Simsion's first novel, The Rosie Project. It's an utterly winning screwball comedy about a brilliant, emotionally challenged geneticist who's determined to find a suitable wife with the help of a carefully designed questionnaire, and the patently unsuitable woman who keeps distracting him from his search.

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Remembrances
3:36 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Tom Clancy Dies, Left 'Indelible Mark' On Thriller Genre

Tom Clancy, seen here in 2010, was an insurance agent before publishing The Hunt For Red October in 1984.
David Burnett

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 5:56 pm

Best-selling author Tom Clancy has died. He was 66 years old. Beginning with the publication of his 1984 megahit The Hunt for Red October, Clancy wrote a string of blockbuster thrillers inspired by his fascination with military hardware and history.

Clancy didn't mince words when he talked to would-be writers. "If your objective is to write a book, get a computer and write the damn book," he told members of the military at a 2004 writing workshop. "Yes, you can do this if you try hard enough. It's a lot easier than you realize it is."

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The Salt
2:45 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Fish Guidelines For Pregnant Women May Be Too Strict, Study Suggests

In a study of 4,000 pregnant women, fish accounted for only 7 percent of blood mercury levels.
JackF iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 3:22 pm

The health benefits of eating fish are pretty well-known. A lean source of protein, fish can be a rich source of healthful omega-3 fatty acids and has been shown to benefit heart, eye and brain health.

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The Salt
12:57 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Is It Time To Cool It On Kale Already?

Are we putting too much pressure on this little superfood that could?
Peet Sneekes Flickr

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 12:23 pm

Let's start by agreeing to this premise: Kale is very good for you.

And yes, we here at The Salt have been known to indulge in — nay, crave — kale chips and kale salads on a not infrequent basis.

Still, when we found out that Wednesday is National Kale Day — featuring a kale dance party (we kid you not) — we couldn't help but think: Come on, people, the kale love has officially Gone. Too. Far.

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Sports
10:57 am
Wed October 2, 2013

At 49, Jamie Moyer's Pitching Career Goes Into Extra Innings

Jamie Moyer, shown above pitching for the Colorado Rockies in May 2012, made his major league debut back in 1986. He says that after decades in the major leagues, he'd occasionally have to remind himself that "in baseball terms, I really was old, but in everyday life, I really wasn't."
Andy Lyons Getty Images

We don't often think of professional athletes improving with age, but Jamie Moyer was a better pitcher in his 40s than he was in his 20s. Moyer became the oldest pitcher to win a Major League Baseball game when, in April 2012, at the age of 49 years, 150 days, he pitched the Colorado Rockies to a 5-3 win over the San Diego Padres.

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The Protojournalist
10:12 am
Wed October 2, 2013

The 1,000-Year Calendar: Mark These Dates

In the futuristic books, movies, songs and video games that abound, there is an overabundance of speculation about the distant future.

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The Two-Way
5:15 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Book News: Forward Prize For Poetry Goes To Michael Symmons Roberts

Michael Symmons Roberts, pictured in 2004, has been described as "a religious poet in a secular age."
Gareth Cattermole Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 7:52 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Margaret Drabble Spins A Mother-Daughter Yarn Into 'Gold'

Mark Rose iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:02 pm

When I think of the writers I worshiped when I was starting out in life, I always think of Margaret Drabble. She was 20 years older than I, but the serious, hip, intellectual British novelist whose black-and-white photo appeared on the front cover of some of her paperbacks seemed permanently young. Reading her was like having an extremely brainy and fashionable best friend who'd been educated at Cambridge and had really lived.

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Author Interviews
4:10 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

'Thank You For Your Service' Follows America's Soldiers Home

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 12:58 pm

In the pages of David Finkel's new book, you'll meet a veteran who has recurring nightmares in which a fellow soldier asks, "Why didn't you save me?" You'll also meet a veteran who sees images of dead Iraqis floating in his bathtub, and another who tries to kill himself by biting through his right wrist — the only wrist he can raise to his mouth since his left side is paralyzed.

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