Arts

Author Interviews
1:14 am
Sun September 8, 2013

The 'Wild' Story Of Cheryl Strayed And Her Long-Lost Half-Sister

In addition to Wild, Cheryl Strayed is also the author of Torch and Tiny Beautiful Things.
Joni Kabana Courtesy Knopf

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 11:40 am

Back in 1995, Cheryl Strayed hiked 1,100 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail along the West Coast of the United States. After the three-month journey, she came out on the other side stronger in every way: better able to cope with her divorce, her past drug abuse and her mother's death.

Strayed described the life-changing trek in her 2012 bestselling memoir Wild, and received countless emails from readers describing how connected they felt to her story. But there was one message that stood out in particular:

Read more
Author Interviews
3:10 pm
Sat September 7, 2013

'Be Mine': Love And Identity Tangled In Tehran

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 3:33 pm

How far would you go for love? In Sara Farizan's debut novel, a studious 17-year-old girl named Sahar finds herself deeply, head-over-heels in love with her childhood best friend and neighbor — another teenage girl named Nasrin.

Their story takes place in Iran, where homosexuality is illegal, making their love that much more forbidden. When Nasrin is engaged to be married to a man, Sahar is crushed. In order to openly be with Nasrin, Sahar considers gender-reassignment surgery, which is more accepted in Iran than homosexuality.

Read more
Monkey See
6:09 am
Sat September 7, 2013

Toronto International Film Festival, Days One And Two

Irrfan Khan in The Lunchbox.
Toronto International Film Festival

Two days into the Toronto International Film Festival, I'm 10 films in. We'll talk more about all of these later, but it seemed only fair to share some basic impressions, since I'm certainly logging the seat time to earn them. So here are the 10 I've seen so far.

Read more
Fine Art
5:23 am
Sat September 7, 2013

James Turrell Experiments With The 'Thingness Of Light Itself'

Turrell's 2013 LED work Breathing Light is currently on display at LACMA.
Florian Holzherr LACMA

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 6:47 pm

This is the year of American artist James Turrell. Three major museums collaborated to give this one man thousands of square feet of exhibition space. Turrell's work is all about space, and light and perception. Indeed, the three big shows in New York, Los Angeles and Houston are kind of a tease for his major life's work — the open air spaces at a volcano crater in Arizona.

Turrell fills Frank Lloyd Wright's Guggenheim Museum rotunda with light that slowly changes from purple to tangerine to turquoise and more. It surrounds and washes down on the viewer.

Read more
Three Books...
5:03 am
Sat September 7, 2013

Motherhood: 3 Books On Work, Life And Too-Small Pool Towels

When I was in my 20s, I used to wonder why the media ran so many stories about life-work balance, and specifically about life-work balance for women. Then I had children. Now I'm fascinated by news reports and articles about subjects such as "having it all" and "leaning in." I also like novels and memoirs about the challenges and delights of motherhood, work, and combinations therein. Here are three books I love because they acknowledge and even celebrate the messy way that most of us actually live.

Read more
Author Interviews
3:32 am
Sat September 7, 2013

Billy Crystal's 'Foolin', Full Of Fun — And Feeling

Billy Crystal returned to voice the role of Mike Wazowski in 2013's Monsters University, sequel to the hit Pixar comedy that introduced the outgoing one-eyed scareball — sidekick to John Goodman's furry blue-and-purple star.
Joe Klamar AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 3:07 pm

Billy Crystal is ... 65. He feels that he's gone from being, as he puts it, "a cool Baby Boomer into a Diane Arbus photograph."

Read more
Author Interviews
3:32 am
Sat September 7, 2013

Suspicious? In 'United States Of Paranoia,' It's Not Just You

Conspiracy theorists and other protesters march through downtown Denver on Aug. 26, 2008.
Ben Woloszyn AP

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 11:01 am

Weekend Edition gets a lot of emails that start like this: "Why don't you tell the truth about ..." The Kennedy assassination, Sept. 11, the Lincoln assassination, the birthplace of Barack Obama or John McCain, Pearl Harbor, Area 51, black helicopters or the moon landing — fill in the blank however you like.

Read more
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:06 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Not My Job: We Ask Australian Baz Luhrmann About Austria

Vittorio Zunino Celotto Getty Images

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 3:25 am

Baz Luhrmann's first movie, Strictly Ballroom, was a cheap, independent romance set in the world of ballroom dancing. The 1992 film became an international hit. Since then, the director, writer and producer has become known for his lavish operatic movies like Romeo + Juliet, Moulin Rouge! and the recent The Great Gatsby.

Read more
Theater
3:12 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

'Mr. Burns' And Friends, Surviving Long Past The End Times

Who's That Masked Marge? Jennifer R. Morris (left), with Sam Breslin Wright, Gibson Frazier, Colleen Werthmann and Susannah Flood, in the third act of Mr. Burns: A Post-Electric Play, a Simpsons-inspired fantasia of loss and remembrance by Anne Washburn.
Joan Marcus Playwrights Horizons

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 4:11 pm

If the world as we know it comes to an end, will art survive? And if it does, what kinds of stories will be told after the apocalypse? The answer might surprise you.

The lights come up on a group of people around a campfire in the woods, trying to recall all the details of the hilarious Simpsons episode "Cape Feare," a parody of the Robert Mitchum and Robert De Niro movies, in which Bart Simpson is stalked by the evil but incompetent Sideshow Bob.

Read more
Barbershop
10:04 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Gearing Up For Football Season

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 8:36 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
TED Radio Hour
7:58 am
Fri September 6, 2013

What Does YouTube Tell Us About Millennials?

Ryan Lash TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 11:55 am

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Next Greatest Generation?

About Kevin Allocca's TEDTalk

YouTube Trends Manager Kevin Allocca watches and thinks about popular videos for a living. He talks about how interactive participation has become a crucial part of entertainment — and that Millennials will only demand more.

About Kevin Allocca

Read more
TED Radio Hour
7:58 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Is It Ok To Use The M-Word?

Neil Howe coined the term "millennials" back in 1991.
Neil Howe

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 10:27 am

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Next Greatest Generation?

About Neil Howe's Interview

When demographer Neil Howe first coined the term Millennial back in 1991, he didn't expect it to become a loaded word for a generation some call lazy and entitled. But Howe is optimistic about this generation — and so are lots of Millennials.

About Neil Howe

Read more
TED Radio Hour
7:38 am
Fri September 6, 2013

What Does It Mean To Be A Teenage Feminist Today?

courtesy of TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 11:55 am

Part 6 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Next Greatest Generation?

About Tavi Gevinson's TEDTalk

Read more
TED Radio Hour
7:38 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Is There A Better Way To Find Work?

courtesy of TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 11:55 am

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Next Greatest Generation?

About Charlie Hoehn's TEDTalk

Charlie Hoehn graduated college during a recession, constantly hearing the mantra, "You've got to take what you can get." But after months of rejection, he stopped following that advice. He describes how he built a career by working for free.

About Charlie Hoehn

Read more
TED Radio Hour
7:38 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Is 30 Really The New 20?

James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 11:55 am

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Next Greatest Generation?

About Meg Jay's TEDTalk

Psychologist Meg Jay has a message for twenty-somethings: just because marriage, work and kids happen later, doesn't mean you can't start planning now. She tells twenty-somethings how they can reclaim adulthood in the defining decade of their lives.

About Meg Jay

Read more
TED Radio Hour
7:38 am
Fri September 6, 2013

How Can Young People Make An Impact?

courtesy of TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 11:55 am

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Next Greatest Generation?

About Natalie Warne's TEDTalk

At 18, Natalie Warne's work with the Invisible Children movement made her a hero for young activists. She calls on young people not to let age stop them from changing the world.

About Natalie Warne

Read more
TED Radio Hour
7:38 am
Fri September 6, 2013

The Next Greatest Generation?

"It's who they are, and it's where they want to take this country – I think that's what makes them so exciting and different." — Neil Howe
Thinkstock

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 10:26 am

"I guess every generation feels like, 'Oh, life is so different now then it was back then.' But this feels drastic." — Tavi Gevinson

Whether you call them Millennials, Generation Y, or the Me Generation, one thing's for certain: This generation of young people will change the world. But how different is this hyper-connected generation from its predecessors? And what will be its legacy? In this hour, we hear from TED speakers searching to define themselves and their generation.

Read more
Monkey See
6:03 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'Blue Jasmine' And A Summer Movie Postmortem

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

As summer was giving way to fall, preseason football was giving way to actual football, and Linda Holmes' week was giving way to the Toronto International Film Festival, the Pop Culture Happy Hour gang managed to gather just long enough to look back on a divisive summer full of big, loud, robot-on-robot movies. Our own postmortem can't help but skim past other postmortems — was Man of Steel a hit or a flop?

Read more
The Two-Way
5:20 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Book News: Sushmita Banerjee, Indian Author Who Fled Taliban, Shot Dead

Author Sushmita Banerjee poses at a 2002 news conference announcing the launch of the movie Escape From Taliban, which is based on her memoir A Kabuliwala's Bengali Wife.
Sebastian D'Souza AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 5:58 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more
Book Reviews
5:03 am
Fri September 6, 2013

After Tragedy, Lost Live On In 'Maid's Version' Of The Story

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:20 pm

For readers new to Daniel Woodrell's work, The Maid's Version is a perfect introduction and an invitation to read more. It's a short book — almost a novella at a mere 164 pages — but there are lifetimes captured here. Woodrell sets the story in his beloved Missouri Ozarks, and he writes with clear-eyed observation, introducing the reader to characters whose lives are shaped as much by their rural landscape as by the moral ambiguities — the collective lies, constraints and collusions — that form the necessary glue holding their community together.

Read more
Movie Reviews
10:10 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Dentist, Heal Thy Sister (And Vice Versa)

Reach Out And ... What Was It Again? Josh Pais and Rosemarie DeWitt are a brother and sister with serious life changes to negotiate in Touchy Feely.
Magnolia Pictures

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 1:40 pm

Read more
The Salt
4:41 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Was Your Chicken Nugget Made In China? It'll Soon Be Hard To Know

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 10:52 am

Here's a bit of news that might make you drop that chicken nugget midbite.

Just before the start of the long holiday weekend last Friday, the U.S. Department of Agriculture quietly announced that it was ending a ban on processed chicken imports from China. The kicker: These products can now be sold in the U.S. without a country-of-origin label.

Read more
Arts & Life
4:10 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

What Elevated Kale From Vegetable To Cultural Identifier?

Of all the healthy foods you could eat, what inspires some people to wear kale T-shirts and sport kale stickers? Why do some people see kale as a part of their identities?

Arts & Life
4:10 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

'Smitten Kitchen' Author On Learning To Love Kale

Food blogger Deb Perelman was initially a kale skeptic — until this Kale Salad With Pecorino And Walnuts changed her mind.
Deb Perelman

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:21 pm

Kale has experienced a renaissance in recent years. Once relegated to the sidelines as a mere garnish, the green now appears on 400 percent more restaurant menus than it did four years ago.

But not everyone has bought into the gospel of the vitamin- and mineral-rich green. Even Deb Perelman, who writes the blog and cookbook Smitten Kitchen, was initially a kale skeptic.

Read more
Movie Reviews
3:09 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Qwerty Can Be Flirty, If We're In '50s France

Ses Doigts, Sont Adroits: Deborah Francois proves adept with the titular typewriter in Populaire.
Jair Sfez The Weinstein Co.

Devotees of '50s Hollywood comedies could have a great time at Populaire, an intentionally lightweight ode to romance and, uh, typing. But the way to enjoy this French souffle is to concentrate on the scrupulously retro music, costumes and set design, not on the musty fairy-tale script.

Read more
Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Mommy Issues, Or: It's Always Sonny In Cougartown

It's a family film: Xavier Samuel and Robin Wright play one of two intergenerational couples at the center of Anne Fontaine's Adore, a film that dares to ask: "Does it count as a mommy issue if you're sleeping with her lifelong best friend?"
Exclusive Media

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 8:48 am

Overused and much misused, the word "provocative" has become a double-edged sword, especially when it's swung in the direction of independent cinema. At its best, the genuinely provocative film — off the top of my head, anything by Bunuel, Shaun of the Dead, Holy Motors -- shocks in order to expand our vision of the world it encompasses. At its most dispiriting, it's an exercise in cheap thrillage, designed to goose a presumptively stuffy bourgeois audience while positioning a director as some sort of iconoclast.

Read more
Author Interviews
11:46 am
Thu September 5, 2013

What's Mittens Thinking? Make 'Sense' Of Your Cat's Behavior

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 4:43 pm

Cats have come a long way from being animals charged with catching mice to treasured, adorable creatures that snuggle with us in our beds. But this relatively new arrangement is creating issues for cats and the people who live with them.

John Bradshaw has studied the history of domesticated cats and how the relationship between people and cats has changed. He's the author of the new book Cat Sense: How the New Feline Science Can Make You a Better Friend to Your Pet, which is a follow-up to his book Dog Sense.

Read more
Movies
9:56 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Autism: Film Shows Education Challenges For Young Adults And Families

Best Kept Secret is a film that follows a group of young adults with autism during their last year of high school. Host Michel Martin speaks with filmmaker Samantha Buck and Janet Mino, a special education teacher.

The Salt
9:43 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Fad Diets Will Seem Even Crazier After You See This

The 7-Day Color Diet: An attempt to get people to eat more fruits and vegetables, this diet requires followers to eat foods of just a single color each day. It ends with a day in which you "eat the rainbow," so to speak. Here's Gonot's cheeky take on orange day.
Stephanie Gonot Courtesy of the photographer

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 10:52 am

On one level, it's easy to understand the allure of a fad diet: Eat this, not that and you'll lose weight, guaranteed. Who doesn't want an easy way to shed unwanted pounds?

Read more
Theater
8:58 am
Thu September 5, 2013

In Small Spaces, Theater-Makers Are Telling Big Stories

Talk Of The Town: Mia Vallet and Joe Tippett star in Ashville, the newest of the five-show Hill Town Plays cycle from playwright Lucy Thurber. Currently being staged by a consortium of New York theater companies, it's just one of several large-scale stage projects on schedules this fall.
Sandra Coudert

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 2:44 pm

Monologist Mike Daisey has a new story to tell, and if you want to hear it, then you'd better settle in. It's going to take a month to get through it.

In one sense, All the Faces of the Moon, starting Sept. 5 at the Public Theater in New York, is a collection of 29 different monologues, which Daisey will perform consecutively and for one night only. Each piece has its own narrative, so even if they see just one installment, audiences can have a complete experience.

Pull back, though, and the project becomes a single massive opus — one that runs about 44 hours.

Read more

Pages