Arts

The Two-Way
8:14 am
Mon December 1, 2014

Book News: Jacqueline Woodson Addresses Lemony Snicket's Watermelon Joke

Jacqueline Woodson, pictured here at the National Book Awards ceremony last month, won the young people's literature prize for her memoir in verse, Brown Girl Dreaming.
Robin Platzer/Twin Images AP

Originally published on Mon December 1, 2014 11:04 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Salt
1:34 am
Mon December 1, 2014

Mexican Chef Serves Up An Authoritative Guide To Her Country's Cuisine

With over 700 pages and 600 recipes, Mexico: The Cookbook, attempts to document exhaustively the country's varied regional cuisines. Recipes in the book include (from left): potato and chorizo tacos; divorced eggs with tomatillo sauce; and tikin-xik fish, a grouper dish from the Yucatan Peninsula.
Courtesy of Fiamma Piacentini-Huff and Phaidon

Originally published on Mon December 1, 2014 7:21 am

If you want to give your taste buds a gustatory tour of Mexico, then Margarita Carrillo is ready to be your guide.

The Mexican chef and food activist has spent years gathering hundreds of recipes from every region of the country for Mexico: The Cookbook, her new, encyclopedic take on her country's cuisine.

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New Boom
6:55 pm
Sun November 30, 2014

For These Millennials, Gender Norms Have Gone Out Of Style

Originally published on Mon December 1, 2014 7:49 am

Cameron Finucane, a burly, 26-year-old technology consultant in Ithaca, N.Y., started painting his nails a few months ago. He has just started dating Emily Coon, a 24-year-old writer who has sworn off nail polish.

Finucane and Coon, as well as many other millennials, say they find traditional notions of gender too confining, even ill-fitting. They are challenging the idea that men must dress a certain way, and women another. And they are rewriting the rules and refashioning clothes so that they can dress and accessorize in whatever way feels right to them.

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Remembrances
6:07 am
Sun November 30, 2014

Mark Strand's Poetry Moved Easily From Common To Sublime

Originally published on Sun November 30, 2014 10:44 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Photography
6:07 am
Sun November 30, 2014

First Rule In iPhone Photography: Edit, Edit, Edit

Originally published on Sun November 30, 2014 10:44 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Book Reviews
3:44 am
Sun November 30, 2014

An Aging Rake, An Ingenue, And A Strapping Young Painter In 'Tristana'

Superstock The Art Archive

History and literature are fraught with men of insatiable appetites, who use their gifts of seduction to charm their way into many a bedroom: Casanova, Lord Byron, Don Juan, the list goes on. In Tristana, Benito Pérez Galdós' masterful 1892 novel — newly reissued by NYRB Classics in a translation by Margaret Jull Costa — we meet a man of Byronic decadence: Don Lope, an aging lover whose sexual conquests know no bounds.

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Author Interviews
2:57 pm
Sat November 29, 2014

Backstage With Janis Joplin: Doubts, Drugs And Compassion

Janis Joplin
Tucker Ransom/Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 1, 2014 11:08 am

Janis Joplin felt a sense of outsider isolation throughout her life. She once said, "On stage, I make love to 25,000 different people. Then I go home alone."

But she wasn't alone — she had John Byrne Cooke.

Cooke was Janis Joplin's first and only road manager, from 1967 until her death from a heroin overdose in 1970. He was the one who found her body. In a new memoir, On the Road With Janis Joplin, he details the electrifying performances — and the drugs — that marked Joplin's tours.

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Movie Interviews
2:57 pm
Sat November 29, 2014

In 'Imitation Game,' An Outsider Takes Center Stage

Benedict Cumberbatch stars as British mathematician and scientist Alan Turing in The Imitation Game; Charles Dance plays Commander Denniston. Director Morten Tyldum says the movie is set up like a mystery — "like a puzzle you're piecing together."
Jack English Black Bear Pictures

Originally published on Sat November 29, 2014 4:29 pm

The new film The Imitation Game, Benedict Cumberbatch plays Alan Turing — the eccentric, socially awkward British mathematician who led the effort to break the Nazi's secret Enigma code.

In part, it's a movie about a great intellectual achievement, instrumental to winning World War II — but the film also traces the bullying Turing faced as a child, and the trials he endured as a gay man in Britain at a time when homosexuality was a crime.

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The Two-Way
1:10 pm
Sat November 29, 2014

Former U.S. Poet Laureate Mark Strand Dies At 80

Former U.S. Poet Laureate Mark Strand (right) with Mexican author and Nobel Prize winner for literature, Ocatavio Paz, at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, in 1995. Strand has died of cancer at age 80.
Joe Cavareta AP

Originally published on Sat November 29, 2014 1:38 pm

Mark Strand, a former U.S. poet laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winner whose verse is recognized for its wit and introspection, has died at age 80 from cancer, according to his daughter and a close family friend.

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Books
10:05 am
Sat November 29, 2014

The Mystery Of The Missing Brains

Copyright 2014 KUT-FM. To see more, visit http://kut.org.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

For decades a collection of human remains sat in a basement at the University of Texas at Austin. KUT's Matt Largey tells us about the enduring mysteries that surround the collection.

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Code Switch
9:45 am
Sat November 29, 2014

A Musical Tribute For A Waiter Who Spoke Out Against Racism

Justin Hopkins sings during a tribute show for Booker Wright, who worked in a whites-only restaurant in the Mississippi Delta.
Brandall Atkinson Courtesy of Southern Foodways Alliance

Originally published on Sat November 29, 2014 10:05 am

Editor's note: This story contains racial slurs.

A new musical work pays tribute to an unlikely and little-known civil rights activist: Booker T. Wright. You won't find his name in history textbooks. But his story is a testament to the everyday experiences of blacks in the Jim Crow South.

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History
9:15 am
Sat November 29, 2014

Jesus Started A Chain Letter — And Other Hoaxes

Published in London around 1795, this "copy" of a letter from Jesus in heaven was the imagined correspondence between Jesus and King Abgar of Edessa.
Sheridan Libraries JHU

Originally published on Sat November 29, 2014 12:26 pm

William Shakespeare wrote in the margins of his books. Noah washed up in Vienna after the flood. Jesus sent a letter back to Earth after his ascension to heaven.

Did you miss those artifacts of history?

Of course you did. They're all frauds, concocted to convince the unsuspecting — and often they did.

These frauds are part of a new exhibit, "Fakes, Lies and Forgeries," at the George Peabody Library in Baltimore.

Curator Earle Havens says the exhibit is timely — these days, the media presents us with fakes and lies all the time.

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Author Interviews
5:46 am
Sat November 29, 2014

Art And Death Are Two Things At Once In 'How To Be Both'

Originally published on Sat November 29, 2014 10:05 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Movie Interviews
5:46 am
Sat November 29, 2014

Documentary Recalls The Talented, Difficult Life Of Bing Crosby

Originally published on Sat November 29, 2014 10:05 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Bing Crosby is the voice of Christmas still.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WHITE CHRISTMAS")

BING CROSBY: (Singing) I'm dreaming of a white Christmas just like the ones I used to know.

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The Salt
5:46 am
Sat November 29, 2014

Chicken Confidential: How This Bird Came To Rule The Cultural Roost

Free-range chickens stand in a pen at an organic-accredited poultry farm in Germany.
Joern Pollex Getty Images

Originally published on Sat November 29, 2014 10:05 am

If you looked at Earth from far off in the solar system, would it look like it's run by humans — or chickens? There are about three times as many chickens as people on this planet. And while horses and dogs are often celebrated as humankind's partner in spreading civilization, a new book argues it's really the chicken.

Andrew Lawler, author of Why Did the Chicken Cross the World?, tells NPR's Scott Simon about the chicken's malleability, its religious symbolism and the most disturbing thing he learned while researching his book.

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Book Reviews
4:03 am
Sat November 29, 2014

Purple Spirit Ninjas And Mohawked Foxes: 'Shutter' Is A New Adventure

Originally published on Mon December 1, 2014 8:41 am

Indiana Jones and Lara Croft have nothing on Kate Kristopher.

Indy, Lara and a host of famous explorers get their butts symbolically kicked in Shutter, the first postmodern adventure comic. Kate may be human, but that's about all she has in common with her forebears in the world-traveling biz. Even so, she manages to be cooler than all of them.

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The Salt
4:05 pm
Fri November 28, 2014

From Humble Salt To Fancy Freezing: How To Up Your Cocktail Game

Smoke and mirrors: Dave Arnold plays around with liquid nitrogen in a cocktail glass during his interview with NPR's Ari Shapiro.
Claire Eggers NPR

Originally published on Mon December 1, 2014 12:36 pm

Dave Arnold can work some serious magic with a cocktail shaker. But he's no alchemist — Arnold, who runs the Manhattan bar Booker and Dax, takes a very scientific approach to his craft.

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This Week's Must Read
3:27 pm
Fri November 28, 2014

After The Ferguson Decision, A Poem That Gives Name To The Hurt

Originally published on Fri November 28, 2014 4:22 pm

Since George Zimmerman was found not guilty of killing Trayvon Martin, I've been repeating these words by the poet Audre Lorde like a prayer. She writes:

For those of us
who were imprinted with fear
like a faint line in the center of our foreheads
learning to be afraid with our mother's milk
for by this weapon
this illusion of some safety to be found
the heavy-footed hoped to silence us
For all of us
this instant and this triumph
We were never meant to survive.

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Television
3:27 pm
Fri November 28, 2014

Diversity On 'The Walking Dead' Wasn't Always Handled Well

Chad Coleman, left and Sonequa Martin-Green star as Tyreese and Sasha on AMC's The Walking Dead.
Frank Ockenfels AMC

Originally published on Fri November 28, 2014 4:22 pm

Language advisory: Quotes from The Walking Dead in this story contain language some find offensive.


For The Walking Dead, it was less like a conversation between two characters and more like a mini manifesto.

The moment came during an episode called "Four Walls and Roof," as Bob Stookey spoke to hero Rick Grimes about a central theme this season: keeping your humanity in midst of a zombie apocalypse.

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Art & Design
3:27 pm
Fri November 28, 2014

'New Yorker' Cover Shows A Divided St. Louis

Originally published on Fri November 28, 2014 4:22 pm

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Bob Staake, illustrator of the controversial cover of The New Yorker, which depicts the St. Louis skyline divided in half.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Monkey See
8:21 am
Fri November 28, 2014

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Kid Stuff And Leftover Outtakes

NPR

It's a holiday weekend for many of us, but we've still got a fresh episode — and a sparkly new panelist in the fourth chair: Guy Raz, host of NPR's TED Radio Hour. When we asked Guy about coming on the show, we learned that pop-culture-wise, he — like our own Stephen Thompson — spends a lot of time sharing stuff with his kids. So this seemed like a good week to get around to Disney's current hit, Big Hero 6. But not just that! We also cover new shows on Amazon, old films Stephen will harass you into seeing, and lots more.

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Art & Design
2:00 am
Fri November 28, 2014

Gold-Plated Gowns And 8-inch Pumps: The Stuff That Made Starlets Shimmer

Mae West is said to have worn these super platform shoes both on screen and off.
Brian Sanderson Courtesy of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Originally published on Fri November 28, 2014 5:16 am

Dripping in diamonds and shimmering in silks, the movie stars of the 1930s and '40s dazzled on the silver screen. Now, some of their costumes and jewels are on view at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. There, a film clip runs on a wall behind gorgeously gowned mannequins lit by sconces and chandeliers. The clip is from 1932's No Man of Her Own, starring Clark Gable and Carole Lombard. Nearby, co-curator Michelle Finamore points to the actual gown Lombard wore. It's long, made of slinky silk crepe and covered in teeny gold-colored glass beads.

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Remembrances
2:23 pm
Thu November 27, 2014

'Queen Of Crime' PD James Was A Master Of Her Craft

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 5:12 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

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Movie Interviews
2:23 pm
Thu November 27, 2014

Beware The 'Babadook,' The Monster Of Your Own Making

In an independent, Australian film, a single mother (Essie Davis) and her troubled young son (Noah Wiseman) are terrorized by a mysterious character from a children's book called Mister Babdook.
Matt Nettheim Causeway Films

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 5:12 pm

The monsters of repression are what terrorize a single mom and her little boy in The Babadook. The small, independent, Australian, feminist horror movie was one of the buzziest films coming out of the 2014 Sundance Film Festival. As of this writing, The Babadook enjoys an impressive 97 percent positive score on Rotten Tomatoes.

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Movies
2:23 pm
Thu November 27, 2014

The Holiday Films Are Coming, From 'Moses' To 'Annie'

Rameses (Joel Edgerton) and his wife Nefertari (Golshifteh Farahani) try to save their stricken child, a victim of one of the plagues, in Exodus: Gods And Kings.
Kerry Brown Twentieth Century Fox

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 5:57 pm

Every year, Hollywood tries to go out with a bang — the question this year is, which bang will be biggest? For sheer moviemaking grandeur, you'd think it would be hard to top the subduing of the dragon Smaug in The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies. But Peter Jackson's only got Gandalf and armies. In Exodus: Gods And Kings, Ridley Scott's got Moses, 400,000 slaves, and an effects budget Pharaoh would envy, not to mention the parting of the Red Sea.

Shall we call that a draw?

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Remembrances
10:12 am
Thu November 27, 2014

For P.D. James, A Good Mystery Celebrated Human Intelligence

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Two-Way
7:03 am
Thu November 27, 2014

British Mystery Novelist P.D. James Dies At 94

Author P.D. James, whose publisher says died at age 94.
Ulla Montan AP

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 9:32 am

British mystery and crime novelist P.D. James, whose best-known works featured poet and Scotland Yard detective Adam Dalgliesh as a protagonist, has died at age 94, her publisher says.

Phyllis Dorothy James, a baroness and award-winning writer of such books as Shroud for a Nightingale, The Black Tower and The Murder Room, was born in Oxford began writing in her late 30s and published her first novel, Cover Her Face, in 1962.

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Monkey See
3:22 pm
Wed November 26, 2014

Christmas Bells Are Ringing, And Cable Holiday Movies Are Unrelenting

Candace Cameron Bure and David O'Donnell star in Hallmark's Christmas Under Wraps, which airs Saturday on The Hallmark Channel.
Fred Hayes Crown Media

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 5:36 pm

On today's All Things Considered, my great dream came true: Audie Cornish and I sat down for a chat about Hallmark/Lifetime/UP movies of the holiday season. Do people really watch them? What are they about? Can they save Christmas? You may have read my story a couple of weeks back about being busted watching these movies, so you know that I mean it when I say I watch them and I don't judge.

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The Salt
9:19 am
Wed November 26, 2014

For Native Alaskans, Holiday Menu Looks To The Wild

Akutaq or agutak — also known as Eskimo ice cream — is a favorite dessert in western Alaska. It's made with berries and frothed with fat, like Crisco.
Al Grillo AP

When Americans sit down to their Thanksgiving meal, most tables will feature traditional fare: turkey, mashed potatoes, cranberries. But should you be looking for a different kind of holiday meal, head for rural Alaska.

That's where Nellie Gamechuck lives, in a village squeezed between tundra and a bend in the river in the southwest part of the state. Ask her what's for dinner on Thanksgiving, and she opens up the deep freeze. "Walrus meat, moose meat," she says. Digging down through the layers, she reaches the dessert level: salmonberries.

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The Two-Way
8:14 am
Wed November 26, 2014

Book News: Despite The Tumult, Ferguson Library Keeps Its Doors Open

Youths walk past a mural calling for peace in Ferguson, Mo., on a building up the street from the city's police department a day before the grand jury decision was announced.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Sat November 29, 2014 10:14 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

A grand jury decision announced Monday not to indict police officer Darren Wilson in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown was preceded by a wave of shuttered doors in Ferguson, Mo. Expecting an eruption of protests over the decision, the city's public schools and many public services quickly declared they would be closed on Tuesday.

The Ferguson Public Library, however, remained open.

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