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The way Jimmy Santiago Baca tells it, poetry saved his life — but he's not speaking in hyperbole. Long before the poet won an American Book Award, Baca was in prison on a drug conviction, where he was facing down a prison-yard fight with another inmate.

Baca sought padding however he could get it.

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This year is the 50th anniversary of the original Star Trek, so mark the occasion, we're going to play a game called "To boldly go where no man has gone before!" We'll ask pioneering journalist Lesley Stahl three questions about the original Star Trek, taken from a new oral history called The Fifty-Year Mission. Stahl covered the Watergate scandal in the 1970s and has been a 60 Minutes correspondent for 25 years.

Sunjeev Sahota has written what I suspect will be finest novel of the year. I know, it's still early in 2016, but hear me out. The subject at the heart of The Year of the Runaways is illegal immigration, which is currently the source of much hand-wringing both here in the U.S. and across the world. Sahota, a British writer of Indian origin, has written not only a timely book, but a gut-wrenching, emotionally honest one, as well.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Rob Reiner has a new film about young people who are confused, troubled, searching — and who are sometimes a pain in the rear; not to mention the heart.

Being Charlie is the story of an 18-year-old boy who runs away from rehab — again — while his father, a former film star, runs for governor of California.

Death is the great leveler. All of us — kings, peasants, beggars and billionaires, saints and gnats will all die. It's the one certainty we share, even if we differ on the fine points of what happens thereafter.

But what if someone set out to circumvent death by having themselves essentially suspended: Technically dead, but ready to be revived? Frozen in some secret location, body and head insulated separately, against the day a technology is developed to regenerate them, with some memories restored and others cast away?

On May 8, the CBS drama The Good Wife will be ending its seven-year run. Why now? "We wanted to go out while it was still good," says Michelle King, who created the show with her husband, Robert King.

In the kingdom of Bharata, horoscopes mean a great deal. The story the stars tell of your life is an immutable truth that will govern your interaction with the world. But Mayavati's horoscope is terrifying: It declares her to be married to death and destruction, such that her father's wives shun and blame her for every misfortune. With war looming at Bharata's borders, Maya's ill-starred horoscope casts an increasing shadow; though she'd rather live a quiet, retired life of the mind, a politically expedient marriage seems like the only thing that can save her kingdom.

Eat lean meat. Bathe regularly. Wear comfortable shoes. Those are three pieces of self-help advice from an unlikely source — 19th-century poet and essayist Walt Whitman.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

As anyone who's been one can attest, new parents need all the help they can get.

While blogger, author and mother of two Asha Dornfest can't come do the night feedings, she does have a number of MacGyver-style moves that may help avert disaster — and preserve some parental sanity.

Dornfest is the author of Parent Hacks: 134 Genius Shortcuts for Life with Kids, which compiles some of the best tricks from her blog of the same name.

The real White House West Wing felt a bit like the fictional one at the center of the NBC television series The West Wing for a brief moment on Friday afternoon.

Posing as her character C.J. Cregg, who was the press secretary in the critically acclaimed show that ran from 1999 until 2006, actress Allison Janney took a surprise turn on the podium to the delight and surprise of the real White House press corps.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

We're so excited that this week's show brings Danielle Henderson to our fourth chair. You might remember Danielle from the chat she and I had about American Crime earlier this spring, and she's back to talk to us about the HBO comedy series Silicon Valley, which just kicked off its third season. We chat about the writing style, the ensemble, the surprisingly nuanced comedic treatment of billionaires, and lots more.

Netflix And NOT Chill

Apr 29, 2016

This game is a play on the slang term "Netflix and Chill," but every answer ends with a word rhyming with "Chill." Like, "Hey baby. Wanna watch a movie and have a barbecue?" You'd answer, "Netflix and Grill."

Heard on Alia Shawkat And Jeremy Saulnier: In The 'Green Room'

That's What I Hate About You

Apr 29, 2016

Jonathan Coulton plays the bad guy! In this game, we've rewritten The Romantics song "What I Like About You" from the perspective of famous fictional villains, complaining about their arch-enemies.

Heard on Alia Shawkat And Jeremy Saulnier: In The 'Green Room'

Celebrity Reboots

Apr 29, 2016

In this game, we mash-up famous directors and celebrities. For example, "The captain from the TV series Enterprise finds out he's a replicant" is a description of "Ridley Scott Bakula."

Heard on Alia Shawkat And Jeremy Saulnier: In The 'Green Room'

Able Was I

Apr 29, 2016

Buckle up in your racecar and get ready to ride, because this game is all about palindromes! Each answer is a word that can be read the same both forwards and backwards.

Heard on Alia Shawkat And Jeremy Saulnier: In The 'Green Room'

Stump Jonathan Coulton

Apr 29, 2016

In this installment of Stump Jonathan Coulton, we ask him to tell us what color the sun is from space.

Heard on Alia Shawkat And Jeremy Saulnier: In The 'Green Room'

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

50/50 Chance

Apr 29, 2016

The answer to every clue is either "more than 50," or "fewer than 50." That's all you need to know. May the odds be in your favor.

Heard on Alia Shawkat And Jeremy Saulnier: In The 'Green Room'

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Just about a month ago, we introduced a simple idea. And we did it simply. With just a tweet or two, All Things Considered called on listeners to help us celebrate National Poetry Month (April, in case you didn't know). We'd supply the hashtag, or so this simple idea went, and all of you would supply the good stuff — the lines, the lyrics, the sweeping odes and potent gut punches.

Simple at the outset, sure — but your response contained multitudes.

The premise and poster of The Family Fang promise a dynasty of twee eccentrics with maladjusted children, like the Tenenbaums, or the Bluths of Arrested Development. But though the Fangs share the latter's Jason Bateman, here directing as well as once more playing the put-upon son, this is a different failed family, and they strike a different tone onscreen: one more principled and intimate than mannered or mocking.

With Monty Python as the exception that proves the rule, the big screen has been historically unkind to sketch comedy teams hoping their offbeat sensibility will survive the leap from five-minute bits to 90-minute features — and from cult fervor to mainstream success. Some fail outright, like Mr. Show's Run Ronnie Run or The Kids in the Hall: Brain Candy, while others are embraced by fans after tanking, like The Lonely Island's Hot Rod or The State's Wet Hot American Summer.

Clocking in at a hefty 155 minutes, a film about Bulgaria's transition from Communism to capitalist democracy might in principle be a tough sell outside the former Soviet Union. But Maya Vitkova's Viktoria, a handsome, formally adventurous family saga, tells that tale through a powerful maternal melodrama spanning three generations of implacable women bound by blood, spilled milk and the tumult of a world in transition.

Set amid Sicily's stark volcanic landscape, L'Attesa (The Wait) is a visually powerful, impeccably acted mood piece. But the movie is not for the literal-minded — a group that, at times, includes director and co-writer Piero Messina.

As America's population ages, we're going to be seeing a lot more of these kinds of books: I'm talking about memoirs, written by adult children, about the extreme adventures of caring for and reconnecting with their elderly parents.

When comic Jerrod Carmichael moved from his hometown of Winston-Salem, N.C., to Los Angeles in 2008, he was 20 years old and without any stand-up experience. Still, that didn't stop him from jumping into the city's comedy scene.

"What I believe in more than anything is my ability to figure something out," Carmichael tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "So I moved to LA with the intention of figuring out stand-up comedy. ... I wanted to work on stand-up; I wanted to be great at stand-up."

The newest apiary inspector at the Maryland Department of Agriculture has four legs, golden fur and a powerful sniffer.

Mack, a 2-year-old yellow Lab, joined the team last fall to help his mom, chief apiary inspector Cybil Preston, inspect beehives for American foulbrood — AFB — a highly contagious bacterial disease that infects honeybee brood and, eventually, kills the colony.

3 Generations Of Trauma Haunt 'Ladivine'

Apr 28, 2016

Fair warning: Guilt, shame, grief, cruelty — the denser flavors of the human dynamic — make for intense reading. Not handled well, such heavyweight emotions easily turn to stone. But the sharp-edged writing in Marie NDiaye's second novel, Ladivine, warrants spending time with her bleak vision of reality. Committed readers may find unexpected rewards in the harrowing twists and turns this gloomy family drama takes.

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