Arts

Author Interviews
1:35 am
Tue September 18, 2012

In 'Season,' One Plantation's Double Murder Mystery

Attica Locke is the also the author of Black Water Rising, a murder mystery set in a racially divided Houston.
Jenny Walters Harper

Originally published on Sat September 22, 2012 4:35 am

When it comes to healing the wounds of its troubled racial past, the United States is still in its "adolescent phase," says novelist Attica Locke. The 2008 presidential election changed everything she had been taught about race, she says — and, as an African-American writer, she felt compelled to write about that new reality. The result is The Cutting Season, a thrilling, century-spanning story of two murders.

Read more
Author Interviews
3:03 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Renaissance CSI: Machiavelli-Da Vinci Detective Duo

Courtesy of Doubleday

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 4:39 pm

What would happen if two of the biggest names of the Renaissance — Niccolo Machiavelli and Leonardo da Vinci — teamed up as a crime-fighting duo? That's the idea behind Michael Ennis' new historical thriller, The Malice of Fortune. The mystery novel pairs the ruthless political philosopher and the genius inventor and artist together as an unlikely detective team on the trail of a serial killer.

Read more
Reporter's Notebook
2:31 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

For Liberian Youth, A Creative Outlet In Krumping

Franklyn Dunbar, 17, practices krumping with his crew at his mother's house in Paynesville, a suburb of Monrovia, Liberia. Dunbar was born in New York, but moved to his home country of Liberia seven years ago.
Tamasin Ford NPR

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 4:39 pm

The music starts up, masking the blare of the generator needed to power the stereo. The dancers begin, and almost like a relay, they take turns showing their moves. Their bodies shake and contort to the beat. Their eyes are fixed in a stare with a fierce look of anger as they lose themselves in the music.

Read more
Books
12:02 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

How Obama, Roberts Interpret Laws In 'The Oath'

Barack Obama is sworn in as the 44th president of the United States on Jan. 20, 2009, in Washington.
Tim Sloan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 10:25 am

During his 2008 presidential campaign, Barack Obama ran on the platform of "change we can believe in" — but he has a different approach to the Supreme Court's interpretation of constitutional law.

"Obama is a great believer in stability — in the absence of change — when it comes to the work of the Supreme Court," Jeffrey Toobin, author and senior legal analyst for CNN, tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "He is the one trying to hold onto the older decisions, and [Chief Justice John] Roberts is the one who wants to move the court in a dramatically new direction."

Read more
Monkey See
10:13 am
Mon September 17, 2012

The 25 Magic Words Of American Television

iStockphoto.com

Tonight, two new fall shows premiere: Mob Doctor, which is about a doctor who works for the mob, and Revolution, which is about a devastating global power outage and — more than that — a revolution.

Read more
Food
9:34 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Are You A Sellout If You Cook For Your Man?

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 10:03 am

For generations women have been told, if you want a man, learn to cook. That's exactly why feminist writer Shayla Pierce stayed out of the kitchen. But now she finds herself with a boyfriend, learning to cook, and wondering if that makes her a sellout. She speaks with host Michel Martin about her article and her change of heart.

PG-13: Risky Reads
5:03 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Books Behaving Badly: A Tale Of Real Life In Ink

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 11:28 am

Shani Boianjiu is the author of The People of Forever Are Not Afraid.

When I was 11, I found a book that did not know it was a book. It was a yellowing Hebrew translation of Tarjei Vesaas' Norwegian novel The Ice Palace. I found it on the shelf in my room that belonged to my parents' old books. Usually, these books were too long for me.

Read more
Movies
1:38 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Toronto Looks East With Asian Film Summit

Luminaries including Mira Nair, Guneet Monga, Shailja Gupta, Nina Lath Gupta and Dibakar Banerjee attended TIFF's Asian Film Summit Banquet to discuss the growth of a new, realist South Asian cinema.
Peter Bregg Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:52 am

On Sunday, the annual Toronto International Film Festival came to a close after 11 days of screenings, meetings and, of course, parties. It's become an important place to kick off the fall film season. But this year, the festival wasn't only looking west to Hollywood — it was also sharpening its focus on the East, and the rise of new cinema from India, in particular.

One of the films at this year's Toronto festival was called Shanghai; it comes from Mumbai, and was directed by Dibakar Banerjee.

Read more
Arts & Life
2:43 pm
Sun September 16, 2012

A Reminder, Three-Minute Fiction Round 9 Is Open

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 7:50 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF CLOCK TICKING)

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Just a reminder now that Round 9 of our Three-Minute Fiction Contest is open. It's where we ask you to write an original short story that can be read in about three minutes, so no more than 600 words. In each round, we have a judge with a new challenge. And this time, it's novelist Brad Meltzer, and he's come up with this.

BRAD MELTZER: Your story must revolve around a U.S. president who can be fictional or real.

Read more
Books
4:24 am
Sun September 16, 2012

In 'Victory Lab,' A Concoction Crafted To Move Voters

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 12:24 pm

Campaigns today are collecting information that goes way beyond demographics. Data points as disparate as the catalogs you peruse or the car you drive all make up a picture that campaigns use to find common ground with their candidates — and get you to the voting booth.

Journalist Sasha Issenberg describes this data-driven world in his new book, The Victory Lab. There were two "major innovations" that spurred the modern approach to voter outreach, he tells Weekend Edition guest host Linda Wertheimer.

Read more
Author Interviews
4:24 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Doomed Love And Psychic Powers In 'Raven Boys'

Courtesy of Scholastic

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 7:20 am

Maggie Stiefvater is a young-adult author with a passionate fan base — she describes her subject matter as everything from "homicidal faeries" to "werewolf nookie."

She wrote the best-selling Shiver trilogy and the novel The Scorpio Races. Her most-recent book, The Raven Boys, is the first in a series of four that will follow Blue Sargent, daughter of the Henrietta, Va., town psychic, as she becomes involved with the lives of four students at the local private school who call themselves the Raven Boys.

Read more
The Salt
4:23 am
Sun September 16, 2012

To Find Truly Wild Rice, Head North To Minnesota

Joe Hoagland, left, pushes a canoe through a wild rice bed as 14-year-old Chris Salazar learns how to harvest the rice.
Jim Mone AP

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 12:43 pm

Harvest season is upon us, but in the U.S.'s northern lakes, it's not just the last tomatoes and first pumpkins. Through the end of this month, canoes will glide into lakes and rivers for the annual gathering of wild rice, kick started with the popular Wild Rice Festival in Roseville, Minn., on Saturday.

Read more
Arts & Life
4:22 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Beverly Hills' Refuge For The Stars Turns 100

The Beverly Hills Hotel as it looked when it opened in 1912. The bleak landscape would eventually be replaced by lush tropical foliage, and after the depression, the white Spanish Mission-style hotel would be painted its now-famous pink.
Courtesy of Robert S. Anderson

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 3:26 pm

The Beverly Hills Hotel, a place fondly known as the Pink Palace, has preserved guests' privacy and indulged their every whim for 100 years, and the entire year will be filled with celebrations of its centennial.

There have been parties for the neighbors, parties for the staff, and a celebration this week as the hotel becomes the first historic landmark in the city of Beverly Hills, Calif.

Read more
Sunday Puzzle
10:03 pm
Sat September 15, 2012

Missing In Action

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 6:36 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a familiar phrase in the form of "___ and ___." You'll be given the two missing words, each with a letter removed, and you give the phrases. For example, given "lot and fund," the answer would be "lost and found."

Last week's challenge from listener Erica Avery of Wisconsin: Name a world capital whose letters can be rearranged to spell a popular and much-advertised drug. What's the capital, and what's the drug?

Answer: Tripoli, Lipitor

Read more
Arts & Life
2:58 pm
Sat September 15, 2012

Three-Minute Fiction Round 9 Continues

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 3:50 pm

A reminder from weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz that Round 9 of our Three-Minute Fiction, our writing contest where our listeners write an original short story, is now open. The story must be based on the following challenge from our judge Brad Meltzer: The story must revolve around a U.S. president, who can be fictional or real and that the short story has to be 600 words or less. Listeners can submit their story online at www.npr.org/threeminutefiction.

Read more
Pop Culture
2:58 pm
Sat September 15, 2012

Meet 'The Most Interesting Man In The World'

Jonathan Goldsmith plays "The Most Interesting Man in the World" in beer company Dos Equis' ad campaign. The audition, he says, "was a cattle call."
Courtesy of Anderson Group Public Relations

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 1:50 am

Read more
Author Interviews
2:40 pm
Sat September 15, 2012

Embracing Diversity In A 'Multi-Faith World'

Adam Gryko iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 3:48 pm

Time magazine named author and pastor Brian McLaren one of the 25 most influential evangelicals in America.

McLaren has written more than 20 books, and he is a principal figure in the Emerging Church, a Christian movement that rejects the organized and institutional church in favor of a more modern, accepting community.

McLaren's new book is called Why Did Jesus, Moses, the Buddha and Mohammed Cross the Road?: Christian Identity in a Multi-Faith World.

Read more
Arts
12:00 pm
Sat September 15, 2012

STATE OF THE ARTS: EPCC 4th Annual Literary Fiesta

EPCC English Instructors, Carla Newman and Margie Nelson Rodriguez, preview the 4th Annual Literary Fiesta featuring the best local literary talent.

Arts
12:00 pm
Sat September 15, 2012

24th Season of Shakespeare on-the-Rocks

Directors and Actors, Jesse Snyder and Carlos de la Garza Garciapreview the 24th season of Shakespeare on-the-Rocks at the Chamizal National Memorial.

Information: http://www.shakespeareontherocks.com

Arts
12:00 pm
Sat September 15, 2012

Lynx Exhibits Opens In The Dark

Co-founders of Lynx Exhibits, Michael Churchman and Laurie Paternoster, along with Education Director Deborah Chaney, talk about El Paso's only locally-owned museum specializing in engaging, hands-on traveling exhibits that make learning fun.

Lynx Exhibits
300 W San Antonio Ave.
(915) 533-4330
http://www.lynxexhibits.com

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:16 am
Sat September 15, 2012

'Thrones' Author George R.R. Martin Plays Not My Job

Charles Sykes AP

Twenty years ago, writer George R.R. Martin left the television industry because TV executives kept telling him his ideas were too expensive to shoot. So he went home and wrote A Game of Thrones. It was the first novel in an epic fantasy series that's now sold millions of copies and has been made into a hit TV series by HBO ... where executives keep telling him his ideas are too expensive to shoot.

Read more
Books
4:37 am
Sat September 15, 2012

'The Black Count,' A Hero On The Field, And The Page

General Thomas-Alexandre Dumas.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 9:35 am

Gen. Thomas-Alexandre Dumas was one of the heroes of the French Revolution — but you won't find a statue of him in Paris today.

He led armies of thousands in triumph through treacherous territory, from the snows of the Alps to the sands of Egypt, and his true life stories inspired his son, Alexandre Dumas, to write The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers.

Read more
Movie Interviews
4:06 am
Sat September 15, 2012

Amy Adams: A Steely Wife Stands Behind 'The Master'

In Paul Thomas Anderson's The Master, Amy Adams plays Peggy Dodd, the spouse of a charismatic spiritual leader, played by Philip Seymour Hoffman. Adams says her character is smart and educated but feels "more powerful behind a man than in front of a man."
The Weinstein Co.

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 10:57 am

Amy Adams has played a Disney princess, a puckish Amelia Earhart, an innocent young nun and a blogging Brooklynite who wants to follow the recipe for being Julia Child.

But she takes a more steely turn in her latest role in The Master, which has just opened in New York and Los Angeles. The film, written and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson, also stars Joaquin Phoenix and Philip Seymour Hoffman.

Read more
Books News & Features
4:06 am
Sat September 15, 2012

A Father's Decades-Old Bedtime Story Is Back In Print

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 12:13 pm

One night in 1947, an intensely curious 5-year-old boy named Michael McCleery asked his father for a story. So his father, William McCleery, produced a tale that revolved around a wolf named Waldo, a hen named Rainbow, and another little boy, the son of a farmer, named Jimmy Tractorwheel. Over weeks and weeks, William serialized the story, telling it in installments to Michael and his best friend during bedtimes and Sunday afternoon outings.

Read more
Author Interviews
4:05 am
Sat September 15, 2012

'Skagboys': Heroin Highs In 'Trainspotting' Prequel

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 12:43 pm

The boys are back — Mark Renton, Sick Boy, Spud, Begbie and other memorable characters from Irvine Welsh's 1994 novel, Trainspotting, come back to life in Welsh's new book, Skagboys.

Read more
The Salt
4:05 am
Sat September 15, 2012

Rosh Hashana's Sacred Bread Offers Meaning In Many Shapes And Sizes

The author's braided round challah.
Deena Prichep NPR

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 12:43 pm

Challah is a rich, eggy bread baked every week for the Jewish sabbath, or shabbat. But for Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year that starts tomorrow at sundown, it gets a few tweaks. There's a little extra honey or sugar, for a sweet new year. And instead of the usual long braid, it's round.

Read more
Monkey See
4:45 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Pop Culture Happy Hour: O Canada!

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

We taped this week's show with half of us in D.C. and half of us — me and Trey, plus NPR's own Bob Mondello — in a studio in Toronto. Why? Because of the Toronto International Film Festival, which provides the front half of the show. Trey, Bob and I talk about a bunch of the films we saw, many of which you can see covered on the blog's TIFF '12 section.

Read more
Books
4:27 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

This Week's 5 Must-Read Stories From NPR Books

iStockphoto.com

Once A Cheater...

One of the most interesting books I've read so far this year has been This Is How You Lose Her, by Junot Diaz. And there's a reason it's such a well constructed read — as NPR's Steve Inskeep pointed out — it took Diaz 16 years to write.

Read more
Monkey See
2:05 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Jackie Chan: Portrait Of The Action Star At 58

Actor Jackie Chan appears at the Toronto International Film Festival.
Jemal Countess Getty Images

Onstage at the Toronto International Film Festival, Jackie Chan describes his first visit to the United States. "I speak no English at that time — I do not even know how to order breakfast. Everyone know ... you know the story?"

"No," says the audience, almost in unison.

Read more
Movie Reviews
11:45 am
Fri September 14, 2012

'The Master': Filling A Void By Finding A Family

Joaquin Phoenix stars as Navy veteran Freddie Quell in The Master.
Phil Bray The Weinstein Company

Paul Thomas Anderson's The Master is both feverish and glacial. The vibe is chilly, but the central character is an unholy mess — and his rage saturates every frame. He's a World War II South Pacific vet named Freddie Quell, played by Joaquin Phoenix to the hilt — the hilt above the hilt. We meet him at war's end on a tropical beach where he and other soldiers seek sexual relief atop the figure of a woman made out of sand.

Read more

Pages