Arts

New In Paperback
5:03 am
Mon October 22, 2012

New In Paperback Oct. 22-28

Fiction and nonfiction releases from Jodi Picoult, David B. Agus, Nathan Wolfe, Dava Sobel and Charles J. Shields.



Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

PG-13: Risky Reads
5:03 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Love And Death At The Toss Of A Die

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 6:44 am

Sheila Heti is the author of How Should a Person Be?

My father gave me The Dice Man when I was 13 years old. It's a novel narrated in the voice of Luke Rhinehart, a jaded psychoanalyst, whose home and professional life have become so boring that he decides, one night, to rule his life by the whim of a die. Starting out, he thinks: if the die turns up a one, I'll cheat on my wife. The die turns up a one.

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All Tech Considered
2:34 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Six New Video Games That Will Get You Hooked

Machinarium from Amanita Design is an adventure game centered a robot who has been sent to the scrap heap. Players solve puzzles to help the robot return to the city.
Amanita Design

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 12:03 pm

Video game makers are rolling out their new titles — with a wide range of creativity and style — just in time for the holiday shopping season. Jamin Warren, founder of Kill Screen magazine, shares his list of video games you should keep your eye on:

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Television
2:33 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Ratings Success? It's All In The (ABC) Family

Broadway veteran Sutton Foster stars in the ABC Family show Bunheads, which, while focusing on adults, is still popular with ABC Family's demographic.
Adam Larkey ABC Family

Originally published on Tue November 27, 2012 3:09 pm

In a sterile white boardroom in ABC Family's headquarters in Los Angeles, two young women are assiduously ignoring a spread of cookies in favor of two more important things: their laptops and a live broadcast of the show Pretty Little Liars playing on a large flat-screen TV.

Dalia Ganz, 28, is the show's social-media manager. She's patiently teaching one of the beautiful young actors on the show how to live-tweet this episode.

"Include #prettylittleliars in your answers," she instructs. That is a literal transcription of her words.

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How We Watch What We Watch
2:28 am
Mon October 22, 2012

For Sports Fans, A Plethora Of Platforms To Watch On

Phil Coke and Miguel Cabrera of the Detroit Tigers celebrate after beating the New York Yankees in the American League Championship Series. Through the power of modern technology, fans could experience the game even if they weren't in front of a television screen.
Jonathan Daniel Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 6:11 am

While most American homes still have a television in the den, how we watch, and what we watch, is changing. Computers, tablets, smartphones, DVRs and video game consoles have redefined what television is.

Viewers have officially become a multiscreen culture. And that means the TV industry is changing, as well. Consider that 36 million Americans watch video on their phones, according to the Nielsen ratings company.

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Art & Design
3:34 pm
Sun October 21, 2012

How A Texas Postman Became An Hermès Designer

One of Kermit Oliver's designs for Hèrmes
Jason Sheeler

Originally published on Sun October 21, 2012 6:12 pm

About a year ago, writer Jason Sheeler was working on a story about Hermès scarves — the elaborately decorated silk squares that can cost as much as $400. He traveled to Lyon, in southern France, to visit the factory, and on his first day there he found an even more interesting story: A French woman threw out a big scarf with a turkey on it and asked Sheeler if he knew Kermit. He didn't.

Kermit, as it turns out, is Kermit Oliver. He lives in Waco, Texas, and he's the only American to ever design scarves for Hermès.

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Author Interviews
2:27 pm
Sun October 21, 2012

A Reminder To Tolkien Fans Of Their First Love

Associated Press

Originally published on Sun October 21, 2012 5:40 pm

Seventy-five years ago, J.R.R Tolkien wrote a book for his children called The Hobbit. It isn't just a landmark piece of fantasy literature; it's a movement — a work that's inspired everyone from director Peter Jackson to the band Led Zeppelin to Leonard Nimoy (who recorded his own homage to the book in the late 1960s — "The Ballad of Bilbo Baggins").

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Theater
4:58 am
Sun October 21, 2012

A Celebration Of Janis Joplin And All Her Swagger

Mary Bridget Davies as Janis Joplin and Sabrina Elayne Carten as Blues Singer in the Cleveland Play House production of One Night with Janis Joplin.
Janet Macoska Arena Stage

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 6:03 am

The countercultural revolution of the 1960s may have been all about sex drugs and rock 'n' roll, but for one young Texas singer it was all about the blues. No one sang the blues quite like Janis Joplin.

Joplin was part of a legendary line-up of musicians at Woodstock in 1969: Jimi Hendrix, The Grateful Dead, Joan Baez. She wasn't on the music scene long, though. Joplin died in 1970 of a drug overdose. She was only 27 years old, but in that short time her bluesy rasp helped define the music of a generation.

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Music Interviews
4:58 am
Sun October 21, 2012

From Elgar To Beatles: Abbey Road Blazed A Trail

The iconic cover of The Beatles' Abbey Road.
Album cover

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 10:01 am

In 1969, four moppy-haired musicians named John, Paul, George and Ringo walked single file on a London crosswalk and made one of the most iconic album covers of all time. Today, a steady stream of Beatles fans and London tourists are still eager to walk in the footsteps of the Fab Four on that famous stretch of asphalt.

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Movie Interviews
4:58 am
Sun October 21, 2012

In McElwee Doc, 'Memory' Fails And Family Clashes

In an attempt to remember what it was like to have most of his life ahead of him, filmmaker Ross McElwee turns the camera on his son, Adrian, seen above.
Fred Wasser

Originally published on Sun November 18, 2012 5:04 am

Filmmaker Ross McElwee is a one-man crew: soundman, cameraman, narrator. He reached a wide audience with his sweet documentary Sherman's March, which chronicled his journey through the South searching for love. The film won the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival in 1987. He's made five documentary features since then.

McElwee's latest film is Photographic Memory — and it presents a different side of the director.

Early in Photographic Memory, we see McElwee in a small town in Brittany, France, in a state of digital disorientation.

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Sunday Puzzle
11:59 pm
Sat October 20, 2012

'Poked' And 'Tummy' Become 'Poker' And 'Rummy'

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 6:03 am

On-air challenge: You will be given two words. Change one letter in each of them to make two new words that name things that are in the same category. (Hint: In each pair, the letter that you change to — that is, the new letter — is the same in each pair.) For example, given the words "poked" and "tummy," the answer would be "poker" and "rummy."

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From Our Listeners
3:00 pm
Sat October 20, 2012

Three-Minute Fiction: Check-In With The Judge

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

(SOUNDBITE OF CLOCK TICKING)

RAZ: For the past few weeks, we've been reading close to 4,000 stories about fictional and real presidents - stories that were submitted by you to our writing contest, Three-Minute Fiction, here on WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. That was the challenge by our judge this round, the thriller writer Brad Meltzer. Your story had to revolve around a U.S. president who could be fictional or real.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
3:00 pm
Sat October 20, 2012

The Movie Susan Sarandon Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Actors (from left) Dorris Bowdon, Jane Darwell and Henry Fonda in a still from the 1940 film The Grapes of Wrath, directed by John Ford.
20th Century Fox Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 8:12 am

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Essays
5:03 am
Sat October 20, 2012

Anxiety Ahoy: Amazon Now Ranks Author Popularity

Toby Talbot AP

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 1:10 pm

What is the point of the best-seller list? Depends who you are. If you're a reader, it's a guide to what's popular — what's new, what your neighbors are buying, and what you might like to read next. If you're a publisher, it's a source of feedback and a sales tool: It tells you how your books compete, and gives you triumphs to crow about on paperback covers.

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Arts & Life
4:37 am
Sat October 20, 2012

Examining The Economy Of Art Thieves

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 2:21 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

There was a huge art heist this week. Paintings by Gauguin, Matisse, Picasso, Monet and other artists were stolen from an exhibition hall in Rotterdam. Picasso's "Harlequin Head" and Monet's "Waterloo Bridge" were among the purloined works. And their loss is estimated to be worth tens of millions of dollars.

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Asia
4:37 am
Sat October 20, 2012

An American 'Revolutionary' In China

Mao Zedong signs Sidney Rittenberg's copy of The Little Red Book during a gathering of party leaders in Beijing on May 1, 1967, at the beginning of China's Cultural Revolution.
Courtesy of Sidney Rittenberg

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 3:37 pm

Sidney Rittenberg went to China as an American GI at the end of World War II and fell in love with the country. He was discharged as a Chinese translator for the U.S. Army, but decided to stay there.

By the time Rittenberg came back to the United States, more than 30 years later, he had become one of only a few American citizens to join the Chinese Communist Party. He translated English for Chairman Mao Zedong, told off Madame Mao during the Cultural Revolution, and endured 16 years of solitary confinement in Chinese prisons.

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Movies
4:37 am
Sat October 20, 2012

A Look At 'The Girl' Who Caught Hitchcock's Eye

Tippi Hedren (played by Sienna Millier) starred in two of Alfred Hitchcock's (Toby Jones) films: Marnie and The Birds.
Kelly Walsh HBO

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 7:24 am

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
6:04 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi Plays Not My Job

Nancy Pelosi takes the stage during Day Two of the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C., in September.
Alex Wong Getty Images

In January 2007, Democratic Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California was sworn in as the speaker of the House of Representatives — and became the first woman to hold that position. She is currently the House minority leader.

We've invited Pelosi to play a game about men breaking gender barriers — three questions about men who've gone where no man has gone before.

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Monkey See
3:58 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

Home Video Review: Universal's 'Classic Monsters' Collection

1954's Creature from the Black Lagoon is featured in the new release of Universal's classic monster movies.
Universal Pictures

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 5:12 pm

Time now for a home viewing recommendation from film critic Bob Mondello. This week, Bob's getting ahead of the Halloween curve, with an 8-disk Classic Monsters collection from Universal Pictures.

The scene you know best is nowhere to be found in the novel Frankenstein. No electrifying the creature with lightning, no ecstatic doctor's cry of "It's alive, it's aliiiiiiive!"

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The Salt
2:04 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

Excuse Me, Is That Bacon In Your Cocktail?

Three of Josh Berner's fat-infused cocktails. From left: Play It Sam, United Colors of Basilton and Chile Manteca Y Dulce. Scroll down for the recipes.
Karen Castillo Farfán NPR

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 11:03 am

The practice of imparting the flavor of something heavy into a lighter liquid is centuries old. Ancient Indian healers did it with botanicals; early Christian monks did it with bitters. But the process is getting new attention as part of the craze to put all things food into all things drink.

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Monkey See
1:45 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

'Friendkeeping': The Close Relationships We Could, But Can't Easily, Let Go

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 2:46 pm

At Monkey See this week, we've been talking about friendship and pop culture. We close with this discussion with Julie Klam, whose new book, Friendkeeping, goes on sale next week.

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Author Interviews
10:21 am
Fri October 19, 2012

Baratunde Thurston Explains 'How To Be Black'

Baratunde Thurston is an American comedian and the digital director of The Onion. He co-founded the black political blog Jack & Jill Politics. He is also a prolific tweeter.
Courtesy of the author

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 10:55 am

This interview was originally broadcast on Feb. 1, 2012. How to Be Black will be released in paperback on Oct. 30.

It's no coincidence that Baratunde Thurston's new memoir and satirical self-help book How to Be Black was slated for release on the first day of Black History Month.

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Monkey See
9:55 am
Fri October 19, 2012

Does The Hallmark Channel Have Basic Cable's Most Efficiently Defined Brand?

Kellie Martin and Ethan Erickson in I Married Who?
Alexx Henry Hallmark Channel

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 2:50 pm

You know Hallmark cards, of course. "When you care enough to send the very best." They made themselves The Company That Makes Greeting Cards, Whether You Like It Or Not, and that brand is made of iron.

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Monkey See
8:58 am
Fri October 19, 2012

Pop Culture Happy Hour: The Nature Of Suspense And Our Love Of Cover Songs

NPR

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 2:53 pm

  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

This week, we're visited by the marvelous Barrie Hardymon for a show about the nature of suspense — brought on by Stephen's and my enthusiasm for the new Ben Affleck film Argo -- and about cover songs. We play a lot of music, including covers we love and the raw materials to put together covers that don't exist except in our dreams.

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Movie Reviews
8:51 am
Fri October 19, 2012

'The Sessions': Sex, Comedy And Something More

Living most of his life in an iron lung forces Mark O'Brien (John Hawkes) to see the world from a different point of view.
Fox Searchlight

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 8:53 pm

In 1983, Berkeley poet and journalist Mark O'Brien wrote an article about sexual surrogates — women and men trained to help people with disabilities learn to use their bodies to give themselves and others erotic pleasure.

For O'Brien, the subject wasn't academic. After a bout of childhood polio, he had spent much of his life in an iron lung. He could talk, and tap out words on a typewriter holding a stick in his mouth. He could feel things below the neck. But he couldn't move his muscles.

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Monkey See
7:48 am
Fri October 19, 2012

Entirely Real Photos: What's It Like At A Rockettes Rehearsal?

Linda Haberman (L), Director and Choreographer of the Radio City Christmas Spectacular directs The Rockettes at the 2012 Radio City Christmas Spectacular Rehearsals this week in New York.
Rob Kim Getty Images

I have no particular wisdom about this photo; I just think it's interesting to see that the Rockettes are never not regimented. I thought maybe you'd be allowed to wear your own dance clothes, but it makes sense that they'd want to see the effect of everyone looking the same, even in practice. These women work hard.

Hardcover Fiction Bestsellers
7:03 am
Fri October 19, 2012

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Fiction, Week Of October 18, 2012

Sherman Alexie's Blasphemy, a collection of stories about Native American life, debuts at No. 15.

Monkey See
6:44 am
Fri October 19, 2012

Morning Shots: 'Girls,' Jerks, 'Sugar Dome,' And Messing With Classics

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 2:51 pm

I continue to be utterly fascinated by Ta-Nehisi Coates and his quest to learn French. "I now understand why two-year-olds are so frustrated," and other insights. [The Atlantic]

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Movie Reviews
3:14 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

Aging Gracefully By Sticking 'All Together'

Five friends decide to move in together as an alternative to retirement-home living in the French-language dramedy All Together.
Huma Rosentalski Kino Lorber

Like the characters in this year's indie feel-good The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel — British pensioners who decide to spend their autumn years living communally and on the cheap in India — the French seniors of the charming yet melancholy All Together face aging in a time of banking crises and austerity measures.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

'Nobody Walks' The Straight And Narrow Path

A married Hollywood sound man (John Krasinski) falls for his collaborator and house guest (Olivia Thirlby) in Nobody Walks, a messily mortifying study of emotional impulse.
Magnolia Pictures

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 6:50 am

October is normally a time for watching movies through your fingers, knowing something grim is about to happen. Ry Russo-Young's new film, Nobody Walks, is no exception — except that at a horror movie, you're guarding against images that are sure to be terrifying. In this intimate, quietly compelling indie drama, they're mortifying.

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