Arts

Monkey See
7:52 am
Mon November 12, 2012

'Skyfall' And An Auteur's Bond: A Fan Makes Peace With An Artsy 007

Daniel Craig stars as James Bond in Skyfall.
Francois Duhamel Sony Pictures

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 1:53 pm

Skyfall, the 23rd canonical James Bond movie, came out in the U.S. this weekend. I am pleased to reaffirm what you've already read about it if you care at all about James Bond movies: The film is good and occasionally great, restoring the character to his rightful station as the grandest of screen spies — or at least the one most likely to take time to introduce himself to the targets of his spycraft by his last, then his first-and-last, names. I assume he formed this habit after people began showing a quite sensible reluctance to accept his business card.

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Poetry
5:03 am
Mon November 12, 2012

I Found My Inner Beat Poet On 'Coney Island'

New Directions Press

Alan Shapiro's most recent book is Broadway Baby.

In 1965, in a bookstore in Brookline, M.A., in the late afternoon of an ordinary school day, I discovered my inner Beat poet.

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Poetry
1:28 am
Mon November 12, 2012

WWI Poetry: On Veterans Day, The Words Of War

Four U.S. soldiers, runners for the 315th Infantry, pose in France in November 1918. The troops reportedly carried official orders to Lt. Col. Bunt near Etraye, France, shortly before noon, Nov. 11, 1918, announcing that the armistice had been signed, thereby ending World War I.
AP

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 3:39 am

Veterans Day — originally Armistice Day — was renamed in 1954 to include veterans who had fought in all wars. But the day of remembrance has its roots in World War I — Nov. 11, 1918 was the day the guns fell silent at the end of the Great War. On this Veterans Day, we celebrate the poetry of World War I, one of the legacies of that conflict.

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Author Interviews
2:47 pm
Sun November 11, 2012

The Adventures Of An Investigative Satirist

Originally published on Sun November 11, 2012 3:39 pm

Daily Show host Jon Stewart recently called writer Jon Ronson an investigative satirist. As Ronson himself puts it: "I go off and I have unfolding adventures with people in shadowy places. I guess I tell funny stories about serious things."

Ronson has collected many of these stories in his new book, Lost at Sea. He talks to Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered, about the characters and places he has encountered along the way.

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Author Interviews
4:39 am
Sun November 11, 2012

'The Last Refuge': Fighting Al-Qaida In Yemen

Originally published on Sun November 11, 2012 10:36 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Movie Interviews
4:39 am
Sun November 11, 2012

'A Royal Affair' That Grew A Danish Revolution

Originally published on Sun November 11, 2012 10:36 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Time, now, another story you have probably never heard before; this one though, absolutely true.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

NIKOLAJ ARCEL: There's this young, beautiful British princess. She's married off to a king in Denmark who she hasn't even met.

MARTIN: This is Nikolaj Arcel. He's a Danish filmmaker. And his latest movie is about the king of Denmark back in the late 1700s, and of course, that beautiful princess who is shipped off to a foreign land.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "A ROYAL AFFAIR")

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Author Interviews
4:39 am
Sun November 11, 2012

Philip Pullman: Rewriting The Brothers Grimm

Courtesy of Viking

Originally published on Tue November 20, 2012 10:02 am

Two hundred years after the Brothers Grimm first published Children's and Household Tales, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm are getting another rewrite.

Philip Pullman, who wrote The Golden Compass of the young-adult fantasy series His Dark Materials, took on the challenge of retelling 50 of the original Grimm stories for his latest book, Fairy Tales from the Brothers Grimm.

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Author Interviews
3:46 am
Sun November 11, 2012

'Heat' Imagines Life After 'Madame Butterfly'

Originally published on Sun November 11, 2012 10:36 am

The second act of Puccini's opera Madama Butterfly opens with the aching aria "Un Bel Di," one of the most famous in the Italian repertoire. Onstage, an abandoned young woman sings longingly for "one fine day" when her lover might return to her and their young son in Nagasaki, Japan.

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Books
3:31 am
Sun November 11, 2012

On Veterans Day, Stories Of Heroes And Homecoming

This Veterans Day, NPR Books went into the archives to find stories of combat and coping. A mother describes the emotional minefield of having a child at war, a Marine writes a memoir of a mortuary, and a photojournalist pays tribute to two centuries of Native-Americans in the military.

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Sunday Puzzle
1:33 am
Sun November 11, 2012

Saluting The Flag

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun November 11, 2012 10:36 am

On-air challenge: Sunday is Veterans Day, so we have a game of categories based on flags. Given some categories, for each one name something in the category beginning with each of the letters F, L, A, G and S.

For example, if the category were chemical elements, you might say fluorine, lead, argon, gold and sulfur.

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Author Interviews
2:27 pm
Sat November 10, 2012

A Tale Of Fate: From Astrology To Astronomy

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 10:44 am

When Katherine Marsh was a young girl, she was mesmerized by the dwarfs of Diego Velazquez's paintings. Years later, that obsession inspired Jepp, Who Defied the Stars, her latest novel for young adults.

Marsh joins NPR's Guy Raz to discuss her book, which is rooted in history, yet speckled with fantasy. It carries her readers to the Spanish Netherlands in the late 16th century to tell the coming-of-age story of Jepp of Astraveld.


Interview Highlights

On Jepp's story

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Movies
2:23 pm
Sat November 10, 2012

Hearing History In The Sounds Of 'Lincoln'

Lincoln follows the president in the last few months of his life.
DreamWorks

Originally published on Sat November 10, 2012 6:23 pm

In the new movie Lincoln, actor Daniel Day-Lewis is getting a lot of attention for his spot-on portrayal of the 16th president. But Ben Burtt, the sound designer, also deserves credit for the film's authenticity. You may not know his name, but you surely know his work.

Burtt is something of a legend in the movie sound world. He has won numerous Oscars, including for his work on Star Wars.

Burtt invented that iconic swoosh of the light saber, using the hum of an old projector and the buzz of a television set.

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The Picture Show
1:42 pm
Sat November 10, 2012

The Waning Art Of The Projectionist

Projectionist Ed Ko at New York City's Film Forum. Ed has been projecting at Film Forum longer than any other projectionist there.
Joseph O. Holmes

Originally published on Sat November 10, 2012 3:02 pm

Do you ever look up at the tiny window at the back of the movie theater and wonder who's up there? Photographer Joseph O. Holmes has followed the flickering light to find out.

"I've always had this fascination with private work spaces," he says on the phone.

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Arts
12:00 pm
Sat November 10, 2012

Poet, Singer, Songwriter Gene Keller

Poet, singer, songwriter, Gene Keller celebrates the release of his new book, Tongue-tied to the Border, featuring 44 years of work on the theme of the border.

Arts
12:00 pm
Sat November 10, 2012

UTEP Studio Theater

UTEP students, Damian Dena and Rachel Gomez, preview performances of The Fever Chart: Three Visions of the Middle East opening at UTEP’s Studio Theater November 14.

Arts
12:00 pm
Sat November 10, 2012

Woman's Club of El Paso

Jean Ames, President and Judith Zar, Third Vice President, preview The Woman’s Club of El Paso’s Silver and Gold Friendship Tea.

Movie Interviews
5:33 am
Sat November 10, 2012

Propelled By Climate Change, Activist Is Drawn To Ice

James Balog poses on the Columbia Glacier in Alaska with two EIS time-lapse cameras in 2009.
Tad Pfeffer Extreme Ice Survey

Originally published on Sat November 10, 2012 9:29 am

Superstorm Sandy has put the topic of climate change front and center once again.

Just after Sandy staggered his city, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg wrote "Our climate is changing. And while the increase in extreme weather we have experienced in New York City and around the world may or may not be the result of it, the risk that it might be — given this week's devastation — should compel all elected leaders to take immediate action."

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Author Interviews
5:33 am
Sat November 10, 2012

B-Movies And Bombshells: A Hollywood 'Entertainer'

Lyle Talbot began his career as an itinerant carnival and vaudeville performer before eventually making his way to Hollywood.
Courtesy of Margaret Talbot

Originally published on Sat November 10, 2012 9:29 am

Lyle Talbot was born in 1902, just around the time when movies were getting started. He joined a traveling carnival, toured in theater troupes and wound up in Hollywood, where he became a reliable B-movie player. Eventually, Talbot became a fixture of family-friendly television on Leave It to Beaver and Ozzie and Harriet.

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Author Interviews
3:43 am
Sat November 10, 2012

Ian McEwan's 'Sweet Tooth' Pits Spy Vs. Scribe

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat November 10, 2012 9:29 am

Author Ian McEwan's latest creation, Serena Frome, isn't much of a spy. She got recruited into MI5 by her Cambridge history tutor, whom she wanted to dazzle. But he dumps her, and she never sees it coming. She winds up on the clerical side of the operation, cross-filing schemes and plots to stop terrorists, until one day, in the middle of the Cold War, she's summoned to the fifth floor of the agency, where five wise men ask her to rank three British novelists according to their merit: Kingsley Amis, William Golding and David Storey.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
11:43 pm
Fri November 9, 2012

Martha Stewart Plays Not My Job

Stephen Lovekin Getty Images

For 30 years, Martha Stewart has been teaching people how to be classy, useful, attractive and elegant, with her books, TV shows, magazines and websites. Though we'd like her to declare Wait Wait one of her trademark "good things," we can't promise that's going to happen.

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NewsPoet: Writing The Day In Verse
3:09 pm
Fri November 9, 2012

NewsPoet: Idra Novey Writes The Day In Verse

Idra Novey visits NPR headquarters in Washington.
Ryan Smith NPR

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 10:17 am

Today at All Things Considered, we continue a project we're calling NewsPoet. Each month, we bring in a poet to spend time in the newsroom — and at the end of the day, to compose a poem reflecting on the day's stories.

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Movie Interviews
3:09 pm
Fri November 9, 2012

Daniel Day-Lewis On Creating A Voice From The Past

Day-Lewis used firsthand accounts of Abraham Lincoln's speeches, along with his personal letters, to develop a voice and a style for Steven Spielberg's biographical drama.
David James DreamWorks

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 1:29 pm

Daniel Day-Lewis has won two Academy Awards for fully immersing himself in his characters in There Will Be Blood and My Left Foot.

Now the British actor is taking on one of America's most iconic figures in Steven Spielberg's Lincoln, playing the 16th president during the final months of his life. Day-Lewis tells NPR's Melissa Block that it was a daunting prospect — but that ultimately Lincoln was a surprisingly accessible figure.


Interview Highlights

On playing such an iconic figure

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Author Interviews
11:52 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Interrupting Violence With The Message 'Don't Shoot'

David M. Kennedy is the director of the Center for Crime Prevention and Control, and professor of criminal justice at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City.

Courtesy of David M. Kennedy

This interview was originally broadcast on Nov. 1, 2011. Don't Shoot is now out in paperback.

In 1985, David M. Kennedy visited Nickerson Gardens, a public housing complex in south-central Los Angeles. It was the beginning of the crack epidemic, and Nickerson Gardens was located in what was then one of the most dangerous neighborhoods in America.

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Movie Reviews
9:53 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Historical, Fictional Icons Take To The Big Screen

Daniel Craig stars as the quintessential MI6 agent, James Bond, in Skyfall. The Bond franchise is 50 years old this year.
Francois Duhamel Sony Pictures

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 11:52 am

Two icons, Abraham Lincoln and James Bond, make triumphant appearances this week in movies with more in common than you'd expect. True, Lincoln is a titan of history, liberator of slaves, and as such an adversary of Western colonialism, while 007 is an outlandish stereotype embodying white male Western authoritarian power. But the makers of these films do a sterling job of testing their respective subjects in front of our eyes — before pronouncing them fit to carry on in our collective imagination.

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Monkey See
9:23 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Arcades, Nose Putty, And Lisbeth Salander's Parents

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

As you may recall, last week's storm (big hugs to those of you still dealing with that mess) left us without a show, but we have returned this week with a fully stuffed episode in which we spend a little time on what we meant talk about last week: Cloud Atlas, which Stephen and I in particular did not want to have seen at almost 10:00 at night for nothing.

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The Salt
8:48 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Brothers' Original Fairy Tales Offer Up A Grimm Menu

Improbably, a girl finds strawberries in the snow to feed her stepmother in The Three Little Men in the Woods.
Arthur Rackham, Little Brother and Little Sister and other Tales by the Brothers Grimm

Originally published on Tue December 4, 2012 6:37 am

If you've only come across fairy tales courtesy of Walt Disney, or some other sweetened retelling, the dark culinary themes in the 19th-century versions told by the two German brothers, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, may come as a shock.

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Movie Interviews
1:16 am
Fri November 9, 2012

From The Theater To MI6: Sam Mendes On 'Skyfall'

Sam Mendes, best known for his Academy Award-nominated films American Beauty and Revolutionary Road, takes a turn with the action film Skyfall.
Stuart Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 10:46 am

A new James Bond movie opens this week, 50 years after the first film, Dr. No.

The latest installment, Skyfall, finds Daniel Craig once again in 007's perfectly tailored suit. And this time, Bond is battling both the bad guys and his own mortality.

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Monkey See
4:03 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Circus Roboticus, Or: This Actor Is A Serious Heavyweight

The cast and creative team of Sans Objet learned the hard way that a 2,800-pound robot can be a bit of a diva: Because he's run by a computer program, he never forgets his blocking.
Algae Bory

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 9:45 am

Whenever the military rolls out some revolutionary new robot, folks are quick with the Skynet jokes. But in recent years, some robotic-evolution experiments suggest that robotic rebellion might end in applause rather than annihilation.

Take, for example, the robot KUKA — the hulking star of a French nouveau-cirque performance, Sans Objet, which premieres at the Brooklyn Academy of Music on Friday. It's no special effect; it's a real robot, developed by the automotive industry in the 1970s.

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Author Interviews
4:02 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

What Happens When Kids Fall 'Far From The Tree'

iStockphoto.com

As the old saying goes, the apple doesn't fall far from the tree. In other words, the child takes after the parent; the son is a chip off the old block.

Of course, that's often not the case. Straight parents have gay children and vice versa; autistic children are born to parents who don't have autism; and transgender kids are born to parents who are perfectly comfortable with their gender.

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Movie Reviews
3:45 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Bond Is Back And Living Up To His Reputation

Daniel Craig returns for a third outing as James Bond in Skyfall, the 23rd installment in the spy movie franchise, and its 50th-anniversary release.
Francois Duhamel Sony Pictures

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 4:02 pm

Istanbul: Somebody's stolen a hard drive with info sensitive enough that ... oh, who cares? Bond is giving chase, and that's all that matters — cars careening through bazaars, motorcycles flying across rooftops until Daniel Craig's 007 lands atop a speeding train.

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