Arts

Food
10:16 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Sometimes, Food Additives Are Pretty Innocuous

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 11:03 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Author Interviews
10:16 am
Fri February 15, 2013

How To 'Thrive': Short Commutes, More Happy Hours

"Many of us spend more than half our waking hours at work," writes Buettner. So he recommends you find the right job, limit your workweek to 40 hours, take vacations and go to happy hour for some satisfying socializing.

Richard Hume

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 11:03 am

This interview was originally broadcast on Oct. 19, 2011.

Many people believe that happiness comes from money or youth or beauty, but Dan Buettner would respectfully disagree. Buettner visited some of the happiest places on Earth and argues that the real keys to happiness lie in fundamental, permanent changes to the way we live.

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Monkey See
8:12 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Justin Timberlake, LL Cool J And The Presidency

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

This week's show was taped while Stephen and I were still recovering from live-blogging the Grammy Awards on Sunday night, so that was still fresh in our minds. Trey and Glen saw the show as well, so we spend some time this week talking about the awards, the performances, and whether we learned anything. You will experience my new way of tormenting Stephen, and perhaps you'll want to join in!

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First Reads
5:03 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Questions For Alaya Dawn Johnson, Author Of 'The Summer Prince'

Alaya Dawn Johnson lives and writes in New York City.
Alden Ford

Alaya Dawn Johnson has written a number of novels for adults (including the delightful Zephyr Hollis series), and now she's venturing onto the young adult shelves with The Summer Prince, a complex science-fiction narrative set in post-apocalyptic Brazil. The action takes place in the city of Palmares Tres, which is entirely contained in a giant pyramidal structure on a bay, surrounded and fed by giant algae vats.

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First Reads
5:03 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Exclusive First Read: 'The Summer Prince' By Alaya Dawn Johnson

Arthur A. Levine Books

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 9:55 am

Hundreds of years into the future, in a post-apocalyptic world, there's a beautiful city in a steel-and-glass pyramid, perched on a Brazilian bay. It's Palmares Tres, founded and run by women after men made a wreck of the world, and named for a famous 17th century city founded by escaped slaves. The city runs on a combination of futuristic technology and ancient, bloody ritual: Every five years, a Summer King is elected by the people and sacrificed at the end of the year.

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Movie Interviews
12:31 am
Fri February 15, 2013

The Story Of 'No' Is The Story Of Modern Chile

The bright colors and throwback feel of the Chilean drama No mask the very real political consequences of the 1988 plebiscite it depicts. (Pictured: Gael Garcia Bernal as Rene Saavedra)
Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 6:39 am

The film No revisits the moment in Chile's history when 56 percent of the country voted to oust a dictator from power. It's the tale of the ad campaign that helped persuade Chileans to cast their ballots against Gen. Augusto Pinochet in a national referendum.

"This is an epic story, the story of a triumph," says Director Pablo Larrain. "It's how they defeat a dictator — probably one of the biggest bastards that we ever had in humankind."

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Food
3:40 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Couple Ties The Knot With Their Own Afro-Asian Rice Treat

"Jung is a portable meal, wrapped in bamboo leaves," says Jidan Koon. She and her now-husband, Bryant Terry, created their own multicultural version of the traditional dish when they got engaged.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 4:47 pm

Bryant Terry and Jidan Koon's relationship evolved over cooking. So much so that when they got engaged, they created a special dish: Afro-Asian jung, based on the savory Cantonese treat Koon enjoyed as a child in San Francisco's Chinatown. Koon shared the recipe for All Things Considered's Found Recipe series.

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Movie Reviews
3:08 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Say Yes To 'No': Retro Political Thriller Packs A Timely Punch

Brash ad man Rene Saavedra (Gael Garcia Bernal) brings a youthful, positive energy to a campaign aimed at ousting a dictator in the political drama No.
Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 2:18 pm

In 1988, Chile's brutal military dictator, Augusto Pinochet, was facing international pressure to legitimize his regime. Confident that the opposition was splintered, and that state-run media could control the political dialogue, his administration agreed to a simple yes-or-no vote on extending his rule.

It was a vote that even Pinochet's opponents expected to go his way — but it didn't, for reasons made both compelling and instructive in Pablo Larrain's rousing Oscar-nominated drama, No.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

'Shanghai Calling,' And The Answer Is, 'Why Not?'

Self-assured lawyer Sam (Daniel Henney) must learn to trust others and embrace life as an expat in the cheery fish-out-of-water film Shanghai Calling.
Americatown

As Ugly Americans go, Manhattan corporate attorney Sam Chao (Daniel Henney) has a lot going for him. He's a handsome dude with perfectly symmetrical features, a toned bod we get to peek at all but naked, and facile charm to burn.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Kiarostami Eyes Tokyo 'Like Someone In Love'

Akiko (Rin Takanashi) is a young call girl and university student in modern Tokyo who hesitantly befriends an elderly male client.
IFC Films

Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami's Like Someone in Love opens far from Tehran, in a noisy Tokyo bar.

"When did I lie to you?" asks an unseen woman, ensnarled in a difficult cellphone exchange. The viewer is already trying to decipher this person, without even glimpsing her.

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Ask Me Another
2:42 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Forwards And Backwards

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 1:53 pm

Transcript

(APPLAUSE)

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

You're listening to ASK ME ANOTHER. I'm your host Ophira Eisenberg and with me is puzzler extraordinaire, John Chaneski.

JOHN CHANESKI: Hi, all right.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: And we have our next contestants, let's welcome Susan Poliniak.

SUSAN POLINIAK: Hello.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Hi. And Ken Stern.

CHANESKI: Ken Stern.

(APPLAUSE)

KEN STERN: Ken Stern.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: So Susan, you actually were, or maybe still are, a puppeteer?

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Ask Me Another
2:42 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Spot the Mistake

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 7:54 am

Don't you just love pointing out when others are wrong? In this game, contestants hear fictitious reports from actual NPR correspondents, and must identify which piece of information is inaccurate. This game is unpossible!

Ask Me Another
2:42 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

SAT Analogies

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 7:54 am

Transcript

(APPLAUSE)

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Audience, this is what we've all been waiting for. It's our Ask Me One More final round. This final elimination round will determine this week's ASK ME ANOTHER champion. So let's bring back the winners from all of our previous rounds.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: From "Happy and You Know it" we have Brice Gaillard. From "Forward and Backwards" Ken Stern. "Down at Downton Abbey," Tom Miller and "Spot the Mistakes" Sam Meyer.

(APPLAUSE)

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Ask Me Another
2:42 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Happy And You Know It

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 7:54 am

Jonathan Coulton quizzes contestants on the lost verses of "If You're Happy and You Know It," in which the lyrics hint to certain things. The song should really be re-titled, "If You're An Inanimate Object And You Know It." Clap your hands.

Ask Me Another
2:42 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Down at Downton Abbey

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 7:54 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Let's welcome our next two contestants.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Andy Duong and Tom Miller. Welcome to ASK ME ANOTHER, Andy, Tom. So, Andy, you have been to a huge number of countries.

ANDY DUONG: I have.

EISENBERG: How many?

DUONG: Twenty-eight.

EISENBERG: Twenty-eight. Do you have a favorite?

DUONG: The Netherlands actually.

EISENBERG: Oh yeah, yeah, [unintelligible].

DUONG: For many reasons.

EISENBERG: For many reasons? What's your second favorite reason?

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Movies
2:38 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Hooray For Nollywood: Nigerian Distributor Casts Wide Net Online

A typical Nigerian film market in Lagos. Though physical distribution of Nollywood films is booming, the digital market has also grown, thanks to a plugged-in African diaspora.
Pius Utomi Ekpei AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 3:56 pm

The massively popular Nigerian film industry known as Nollywood started humbly about 20 years ago. Nollywood movies were shot as cheaply and as quickly as possible, then released straight to VHS.

Nollywood caught on globally, and piracy was a major factor in the industry's growth, as copies of copies of Nollywood tapes sold on street corners from Lagos to Harlem. In the early 2000s, Nollywood distribution shifted from VHS to discs — and now, the movies are also beginning to stream online.

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Books
2:11 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

You Had Me At The First Page: Writers Who Fell For Each Other

Zadie Smith reads from her book On Beauty in 2005.
Sergio Dionisio AP

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 3:21 pm

Lidia Jean Kott is an intern at NPR Books.

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Movie Reviews
12:13 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

'Beautiful Creatures': Young Love, Supernatural And Southern-Fried

Star-crossed Southern lovers Ethan (Alden Ehrenreich) and Lena (Alice Englert) battle small-town prejudice and mystical evil forces in Beautiful Creatures.
John Bramley Warner Bros. Pictures

Calling Beautiful Creatures a Southern-fried Twilight wouldn't be an unfair claim, at least based on its marketing campaign — which highlights that, yes, this movie centers on a teen romance between a couple of star-crossed kids, one of whom, yes, is all kinds of supernatural. And, yes, their love puts the fate of the world in danger, because, well, why not?

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Movies
11:38 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Oscar Documentaries: A Look Behind The Scenes

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 7:41 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Author Interviews
11:13 am
Thu February 14, 2013

'Klansville, U.S.A.' Chronicles The Rise And Fall Of The KKK

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 3:30 pm

As the civil rights movement gained momentum in the 1960s, Ku Klux Klan activity boomed. That fact itself may not be surprising, but in the introduction to his new book, Klansville, U.S.A., David Cunningham also reveals that, "While deadly KKK violence in Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia ha[d] garnered the lion's share of Klan publicity, the United Klan's stronghold was, in fact, North Carolina." North Carolina, Cunningham writes, had more Klan members than the rest of the South combined.

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Movie Reviews
10:45 am
Thu February 14, 2013

'A Good Day': Wake Me Tomorrow

In the latest Die Hard franchise entry, John McClane (Bruce Willis) and his son, Jack (Jai Courtney), team up to fight nuclear-weapons thieves.
Frank Masi 20th Century Fox

In a dark, dusty vault beneath a studio back lot, are there stacks and stacks of unproduced Cold War-era screenplays? A pile of untapped bad movie potential, like a hidden stockpile of enriched uranium, just waiting for a film crew that's looking to make a quick buck with a dirty bomb of a movie?

A Good Day to Die Hard, the fifth entry in the annals of hard-to-kill New York cop John McClane (Bruce Willis), is not that explosively bad movie. It's the decaying radioactive wreckage left behind after that bomb goes off.

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History
10:06 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Boardrooms And Beyond: Remembering Civil Rights 'Power Broker' Whitney Young

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 10:20 am

Whitney Young spent most of his in the civil rights movement, but he focused on changing business as much as changing law. As head of the National Urban League, he had the ear of some of the nation's most powerful leaders. Host Michel Martin speaks with Young's niece, filmmaker Bonnie Boswell, who chronicles her uncle's story in the documentary, "The Power Broker."

Monkey See
8:58 am
Thu February 14, 2013

A Die-Hard's Guide To 'Die Hard': 25 Years Of Sweat, Dirt And Blowing Stuff Up

Bruce Willis returns as iconoclastic cop John McClane in A Good Day To Die Hard.
Frank Masi, SMPSP Twentieth Century Fox

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 11:11 am

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The Two-Way
6:05 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Book News: LBJ And Lady Bird Johnson's Love Letters Go Public

Lady Bird Johnson and President Lyndon Johnson at an election rally in 1964.
Terry Fincher Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 8:02 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Secrets, Lies And The Allure Of The Illicit

iStockphoto.com

By the time Wendy Plump learned from a friend that her husband had a longtime mistress and an 8-month-old son living just a mile away, their union was already pockmarked with the scars of adultery — both his and hers. She divulges all this and more in Vow, her at times jaw-droppingly frank but ultimately instructive post-mortem on their 18-year marriage.

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From The NPR Bookshelves
5:03 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Sick Of Valentine's Day? 6 Book Stories To Soothe Your Soul

Nate iStockphoto.com

This Valentine's Day, if you're feeling lonely, heartbroken, or just a bit jaundiced, we've got some archive treasures for you — tempestuous relationships, cartoon heartbreak, and a few books that may make you feel less alone — plus a bonus playlist from our good friends at NPR Music.

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Books
5:03 am
Thu February 14, 2013

A Bouquet Of Romantic Reads For Valentine's Day

iStockphoto.com

I love Valentine's Day! There. I said it.

I know plenty of people out there think Valentine's Day is an overly commercial faux holiday, and to some extent I can see why. After all, it is a day when people (especially men?) can feel forced to celebrate romance. Call me an overly sentimental romantic if you want to, but I still adore the idea and practice of a day devoted to romance and love.

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Opinion
12:59 am
Thu February 14, 2013

An Affair to Remember in Pre-Independence India

Sandip Roy and his great-aunt, Debika Ghosh, took this picture after she told him about her great romantic escapade.
Courtesy Sandip Roy

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 1:05 am

For Valentine's Day, Morning Edition commentator Sandip Roy shares a family love story from 70 years ago.

I always knew that my mother's aunt Debika was the most beautiful of all the great-aunts. I didn't know that when she was young, she jumped off a moving train for love.

She is now 90. Bent with age, she shuffles with a walker. But she's still radiant, her hair perfectly dyed.

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Movie Interviews
3:44 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Playing The Big Room: An Oscars Joke-Writer Reflects

Billy Crystal hosts the 84th Annual Academy Awards in 2012. Writing jokes for hosts is a tricky game, says longtime joke writer Dave Boone.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 1:45 pm

Hollywood's biggest night is in just a few weeks. People tend to focus on the glitz, the glamour and — of course — the gowns. But we thought we'd take a moment to focus on the gags.

Or rather what goes into writing both the jokes that fall flat and the jokes that soar. For a bit of Oscars Writing 101, NPR's All Things Considered turned to Dave Boone, who has written for the Academy Awards eight times.

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Opinion
12:48 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Uses For Latin (If You're Not The Pope)

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 1:07 pm

Annalisa Quinn writes about books for NPR.org.

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