Arts

Arts & Life
9:53 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Poet Elizabeth Alexander Muses About Spring

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 11:27 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Next, the latest in our series Muses and Metaphor. That's how we're celebrating National Poetry Month. We're hearing your Twitter poems of 140 characters or less. Today, we hear from renowned poet Elizabeth Alexander. You might remember her from President Obama's first Inauguration in 2009. She composed and read the poem, "Praise Song for the Day" for that occasion. Not only that, she's published six volumes of poetry. She's chair of the African-American Studies Department at Yale University.

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Monkey See
9:15 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Superheroines, Fighters, And Why Isn't There A Wonder Woman Movie?

Katie, who's nine years old, explains her love of Wonder Woman in a new documentary.
Vaquera Productions

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 12:41 pm

Any comics fan of any seriousness can rattle off female superheroes who have either had their own books or appeared in other or ensemble books.

But what about ordinary absorbers of culture?

The same people who don't actually read comics but can tell you that Superman is the idealized, square-jawed fighter for good, while Batman is the darker, more conflicted survivor of tragedy and Spider-Man is the scrapper barely concealing an ordinary kid — how many women can they name who have worn capes, particularly ones that aren't superhero derivatives like Supergirl or Batgirl?

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Monkey See
6:47 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Let's Rush To Judgment: 'Catching Fire'

Screenshot

After the huge success of The Hunger Games, both movie and book, it seems like a foregone conclusion that there's enormous pent-up demand for the next chapter of the film adaptation, Catching Fire. This is the book where Katniss' story becomes much more explicitly political, and her status as a revolutionary and a warrior is more fully realized.

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The Two-Way
5:10 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Book News: Yoko Ono Is Writing A Book Of 'Instructional Poetry'

Yoko Ono poses during the opening of her exhibition "half-a-wind show" in Frankfurt, Germany.
Daniel Roland AFP/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Books
5:03 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Tall Glass Of Rock Star-Ness: A Q&A With Questlove

Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson also teaches a class at New York University called "Topics in Recorded Music: Classic Albums."
Ben Watts Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 7:38 am

Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson is the drummer and co-founder of the Grammy-Award winning band The Roots, which now serves as the house band for the talk show Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. Questlove is coming out with a memoir in June called Mo' Meta Blues, co-written with Ben Greenman. After reading it, you'll feel like you know Questlove. The book is intimate and funny. Plus, you'll come away with a crash course in hip-hop history.

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Author Interviews
1:03 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Friedkin, Who Pushed Film Forward, Looks Back

HarperCollins Publishers

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 11:08 am

As a kid in Chicago, director William Friedkin liked to frighten little girls with scary stories. When he grew up, he scared the rest of us with a little girl — Regan MacNeil, who is possessed by the devil in his horror classic The Exorcist.

And in The French Connection, he put knots in our stomachs with one of the great movie chases in American cinema.

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Monkey See
12:16 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Big Hair, Big Shoulders And Big Money: Linda Evans On '80s Excess

Joan Collins, John Forsythe and Linda Evans at a party celebrating the production of 150 episodes of Dynasty in 1986.
Reed Saxon AP

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 11:34 am

You may find a hint to the era in which you were born (as well as your taste in entertainment) in Linda Wertheimer's clarification that on the '80s nighttime soap Dynasty, actress Linda Evans played Krystle Carrington — Krystle with a K, that is. (And, she does not add, an L-E.) If that surprises you at all, you were almost surely not paying attention to the television of the 1980s, when Evans, John Forsythe and Joan Collins made up the wealthiest, nuttiest, most notorious and most rhinestone-covered love triangle ever bedazzled for prime time: Krystle, Blake and Alexis.

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Author Interviews
3:00 pm
Sun April 14, 2013

A Pilgrimage Through France, Though Not For God

Tourists visit Bugarath, a small village in the foothills of the French Pyrenees, on Dec. 20, 2012.
Patrick Aventurier Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 4:05 pm

For centuries, pilgrims have made their way along the El Camino de Santiago de Compostela, or St. James' Way. It's an ancient route honoring St. James of Compostela and can take a traveler on foot for hundreds of miles to what is believed to be the apostle's burial site in northwestern Spain.

American travel writer David Downie and his wife, Alison, decided to begin their trek from their longtime home in Paris. For Downie, this wasn't necessarily a religious pilgrimage. He stresses he wasn't looking for God, though maybe enlightenment.

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The Salt
10:03 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Junior League Cookbooks: Crowdsourced Recipes, Old-School Style

"Tea-Time at the Masters" is a popular Junior League of Augusta cookbook first published in 1977. It's now in its 17th reprint.
Courtesy of The Association of Junior Leagues International

The Masters Tournament — you think golf, we think food.

Well, now we think food because this week we were tipped off to a cookbook created for the storied tournament in Augusta, Ga.

The Junior League of Augusta, a women's volunteer and civic organization, published Tea-Time at the Masters back in 1977, but it's still in print.

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You Must Read This
5:03 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Dreaming Of Justice: Hardscrabble Lives In Hallucinatory Prose

Alex Espinoza is the author of The Five Acts of Diego León.

Before becoming a novelist and educator, I was a manager at a shop in Santa Monica, Calif., selling sofas and custom-framed art to movie stars and wealthy Angelinos. Eventually I grew frustrated and, determined to reinvent myself as a writer, I quit and went back to school.

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Author Interviews
4:47 am
Sun April 14, 2013

After Tragedy, Young Girl Shipped West On 'Orphan Train'

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 9:04 am

Christina Baker Kline's new novel, Orphan Train, is partially set in 1929, mere months before the stock market crash that would trigger the Great Depression. A young Irish girl, Niamh (pronounced "Neeve"), has just lost her entire family after a fire ripped through their tenement building. She is turned over to authorities who put her on a train bound for the Midwest. The train is filled with dozens of other children who have lost their families in one way or another; they are now hoping that their journey will connect them with new parents and a new, better life.

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Poetry
4:47 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Harmony Holiday On Finding Poetry In Her Biracial Roots

Harmony Holiday is a poet who lives in New York.
Courtesy Harmony Holiday

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 9:04 am

In celebration of National Poetry Month, Weekend Edition is hearing from young poets about what poetry means to them. This week, they spoke with Harmony Holiday, a New York poet and dance choreographer who's spending this month archiving audio of overlooked and often misunderstood poetry for The Beautiful Voices Project.


Interview Highlights

On why she first started writing poetry

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Sunday Puzzle
2:53 am
Sun April 14, 2013

O Say Can You C The Answer?

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 9:04 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a two-word phrase in which the first word starts with O. Drop the O, and you'll get a new word that ends the phrase.

Last week's challenge: Name something in nine letters that is commonly read on Sunday morning. If you have the right thing, you can rearrange all the letters to name a bygone car model that you still see on the road today. What are they?

Answer: Scripture; PT Cruiser

Winner: Pam Smith of Beaverton, Ore.

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Movies
3:43 pm
Sat April 13, 2013

Jurassic Bark: How Sound Design Changed Our Imaginations

A single trumpet from a baby elephant at the San Francisco Zoo was used for every single T. Rex roar in Jurassic Park.
Universal Pictures

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 6:15 pm

Nobody actually knows what dinosaurs sound like. But if you can imagine the roar of a T. Rex or the bellow of a brachiosaurus, it's probably thanks to the 1993 blockbuster Jurassic Park, which turns 20 this summer.

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Theater
3:02 pm
Sat April 13, 2013

A 'Caesar' With An African Accent

Patterson Joseph plays Brutus, the friend whose betrayal wounds Caesar most — and whose suicide caps off the play's second act.
Richard Termine BAM

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 4:09 pm

The 400-year-old plays of William Shakespeare are constantly being reinterpreted and re-envisioned for new generations. Recently, England's Royal Shakespeare Company produced a Julius Caesar set in contemporary Africa that was a hit at the World Shakespeare Festival, presented in conjunction with the London Olympics. Now the RSC has brought it to America.

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NPR Story
2:59 pm
Sat April 13, 2013

'First American Ballet Star' Soared To Fame With 'Firebird'

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 4:09 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

The dancer who brought "Firebird" and "The Nutcracker" to life at the New York City Ballet died this week. Maria Tallchief was one of America's great prima ballerinas. NPR's Joel Rose has this remembrance.

JOEL ROSE, BYLINE: Maria Tallchief soared to fame in 1949 when she danced the lead role in Stravinsky's "Firebird" in a production choreographed by George Balanchine.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED INTERVIEW)

MARIA TALLCHIEF: He was a poet. And he taught us how to react and to become this poetry.

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Author Interviews
4:17 am
Sat April 13, 2013

Dante's Beauty Rendered In English In A Divine 'Comedy'

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 8:11 am

The Divine Comedy is a 14th century poem that has never lost its edge. Dante Alighieri's great work tells the tale of the author's trail through hell — each and every circle of it — purgatory and heaven. It has become perhaps the world's most cited allegorical epic about life, death, goodness, evil, damnation and reward. It calls upon the reader to ask: What would be our personal hell? What, for us, would really be paradise?

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Author Interviews
4:17 am
Sat April 13, 2013

Enshrined And Oft-Invoked, Simon Bolivar Lives On

Simon & Schuster

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 9:05 am

Simon Bolivar is often called the George Washington of Venezuela — and of Bolivia, Colombia, Panama, Ecuador and Peru. Washington threw colonialists out of one country; Bolivar liberated six from Spanish rule. The latter was also considered an artful military strategist with a vision of history and a passion for freedom.

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Remembrances
3:07 am
Sat April 13, 2013

How Did All Those People Get Inside Jonathan Winters?

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 8:11 am

You can call anyone but Einstein a genius and start an argument.

Well, maybe Einstein or Jonathan Winters. The comedian, who died Friday at the age of 87, was immediately hailed by Steve Martin, Robin Williams and others as a genius.

He made hit comedy albums, was a regular on the old Tonight Show, memorably knocked down a gas station in It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad, World and co-starred with and inspired Robin Williams.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
6:51 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Not My Job: Food Writer Mark Bittman Takes A Quiz About Batman

Fred R. Conrad The New York Times

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 9:25 am

Mark Bittman isn't a celebrity chef, and he doesn't own a famous restaurant, and he doesn't have a cooking show. But he wrote the book on how to cook everything, aptly titled, How to Cook Everything.

We've invited him to play a game called "Holy, Bittman, Batman!" We guessing Bittman gets mistaken for the Caped Crusader all the time, so we're going to ask him three questions about Batman ... specifically, Batman & Robin, widely regarded as the very worst of all the modern Batman films.

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The Salt
12:45 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Bands Aren't The Only Things That Incubate At Music Festivals

Customers line up for an ice cream van at the 2011 Glastonbury Music Festival in southwest England.
Matt Cardy Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 6:04 pm

Coachella, the massive outdoor music festival that kicks off this weekend in Indio, Calif., has become an "incubator" not just for new bands, but for rising food entrepreneurs, according to a story in the San Jose Mercury News earlier this week.

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Movie Reviews
10:31 am
Fri April 12, 2013

In 'Paris-Manhattan,' A Limp Allen Homage

Alice (Alice Taglioni), a passionate fan of the films of Woody Allen, tries to convince the uninitiated Victor (Patrick Bruel) to live life the Allen way.
Entertainment One

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 1:33 pm

Woody Allen has made some movies that some people really like.

Ignore how mildly that statement puts things for a moment, if only to recognize that if anyone were looking for a movie with that brain-achingly simplistic idea at the heart of its premise, they'd need look no further than Paris-Manhattan, a meandering muddle that's equal parts tepid Allen homage and shallow exploration of what it means to live life by lessons learned from Allen movies.

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Faith Matters
9:30 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Pastor Jim Wallis Back To Being Political

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, March Madness 2013 is now a memory, but there's still one champion yet to be announced. Yes, we are going to announce the winner of our TELL ME MORE March Madness Challenge. That's just ahead.

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Barbershop
9:30 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Barbershop Guys Weigh In On 'Accidental Racist'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barbershop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

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Arts
9:15 am
Fri April 12, 2013

FOCUS ON CAMPUS: Eurydice


Louie talks with Rebecca Escobedo and Chuck Gorden about the UTEP Department of Theatre & Dance's upcoming production, "Eurydice."  The play is by Sarah Ruhl and it is based on the myth of Orpheus in the underworld, but told from the point of view of his wife Eurydice.  Escobedo stars in the title role, and the play is directed by Gorden. 


Performances are April 19, 20, 25-27 at 8 p.m, April 21 & 28 at 2:30 p.m., at the UTEP Fox Fine Arts Wise Family Theatre.


915-747-5118. Visit the Department of Theatre & Dance on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/UTEP-Department-of-Theatre-and-Dance/132721790087612


Aired April 12, 2013.

NPR Story
8:00 am
Fri April 12, 2013

The Violence Within Us

This episode, TED speakers uncover surprising realities about violence.
Sascha Burkard iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 1:10 pm

Violence and brutality are grim realities of life. Are some of us born that way, or can anyone be pushed into committing acts of cruelty? In this hour, TED speakers explore the sinister side of human nature, and whether we're all capable of violence.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

TED Radio Hour
8:00 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Is The World A Less Violent Place?

Steven Pinker says our perception of how violent we are as a species is skewed.
Robert Leslie TED

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 7:45 am

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Violence Within Us.

About Steve Pinker's TEDTalk

Steven Pinker charts the decline of violence from Biblical times to the present, and argues that, though it may seem illogical and even obscene, given events in Darfur and Syria, we are living in the most peaceful time in our species' existence.

About Steve Pinker

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TED Radio Hour
8:00 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Why Don't Domestic Violence Victims Leave?

Leslie Morgan Steiner shares her story of domestic abuse at TEDxRainier.
TED

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 7:45 am

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Violence Within Us.

About Leslie Morgan Steiner's TEDTalk

Leslie Morgan Steiner was in "crazy love" — that is, madly in love with a man who routinely abused her and threatened her life. Steiner tells the harrowing story of her relationship, correcting misconceptions many people hold about victims of domestic violence.

About Leslie Morgan Steiner

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Monkey See
7:13 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'Mad Men,' Madmen And A Fond Farewell

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

With Trey out this week, we called upon one of our very favorite people, Barrie Hardymon, to join us. We start this week with a discussion of the two-hour season opener of Mad Men, which isn't dropping any major bombs about plot, I don't think, but which isn't tiptoeing either, so use your judgment. We talk about Stephen's first exposure to the much-honored series, the reasons why Barrie likes it better when it stays in the office, how things are changing as we cruise into the late '60s, and why Peggy is really just the best thing ever.

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New In Paperback
3:02 am
Fri April 12, 2013

April 15-21: Courage, Corn Tortillas And Country Music

Scribner

* Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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