Arts

Author Interviews
1:48 am
Tue March 4, 2014

When War-Torn Rubble Met Royal Imagination, 'Paris Became Paris'

Le Pont Neuf, shown here in an 18th-century painting by Nicolas-Jean-Baptiste Raguenet, was completed in 1606 by Henry IV. The bridge's construction kicked off the reinvention of Paris in the 17th century. Today, it's the oldest standing bridge across the Seine.
Public Domain

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 6:04 am

Today, Paris is a city of light and romance, full of broad avenues, picturesque bridges and countless tourists visiting to soak in its charms.

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The Two-Way
4:57 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Teens Live 'A Dream,' Dancing With Pharrell At Oscars

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 2:37 pm

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Author Interviews
2:42 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

What Really Happened The Night Kitty Genovese Was Murdered?

The most well-known image of Kitty Genovese is her 1961 mug shot, taken after a minor gambling arrest.
The New York Times Photo Archive Courtesy of WW Norton

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 8:19 am

In March 1964, there was a heinous murder in the Kew Gardens neighborhood of Queens, N.Y. Back then, there was no 911 emergency number, there were no good Samaritan laws and, despite her cries, there was no one coming to help Catherine Genovese.

Kitty, as she was known, was a bar manager on her way home from work in the early morning hours. According to news reports at the time, she was attacked not once but three times over the course of a half-hour. What's more: There were apparently 38 witnesses.

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Remembrances
2:23 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Alain Resnais, Director And Master Of Disorientation, Dies At 91

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 5:19 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

The French filmmaker who shook up European cinema and offered inspiration to directors as varied as Woody Allen and David Lynch died on Saturday. Alain Resnais caused a sensation with his films "Hiroshima Mon Amour" and "Last Year at Marienbad" in the 1950s and '60s. Critic Bob Mondello offers an appreciation.

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Monkey See
1:02 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Book Club Meeting: Come Talk About Steinbeck's 'Grapes Of Wrath'

The Grapes Of Wrath opens in Dust Bowl Oklahoma.
AP

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 2:44 pm

Late last week, an email exchange between NPR Books' team members went something like this:

Camila: OH MY GOD PIGS EAT BABIES!?!?

Nicole: YUP. But then, later, people eat pigs. So, does that make them even?

Colin: I trust this isn't a spoiler. Ahem.

Tanya: SPOILERS PEOPLE.

Camila: Not a spoiler cus it's NOT EVEN A BIG DEAL. That's the worst part. It's just like "Oh yeah, remember the time that pig ate that baby? Memories."

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The Salt
12:00 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The Shamrock Shake

Michelle Obama says you should get at least five servings of green per day.
NPR

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 1:48 pm

Long ago, McDonald's chose to honor St. Patrick banishing the snakes from Ireland with its Shamrock Shake, made with real snake. It was known for its subtle flavor and powerful aphrodisiac qualities. While the recipe has changed slightly over the years, the powerful aphrodisiac qualities remain.

Peter: Sucking this up through the straw is pretty hard work just to get something that tastes like toothpaste.

Miles: Shamrocks are good luck, but I think the woman who rang us up took it too far when she said, "You're gonna need it."

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Author Interviews
11:34 am
Mon March 3, 2014

During World War II, Even Filmmakers Reported For Duty

Maj. Frank Capra sits at his War Department desk in Washington on March 6, 1942. Capra's non-War Department films include It's A Wonderful Life and Mr. Smith Goes To Washington.
AP

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 11:35 am

When America entered World War II, some of Hollywood's most celebrated directors enlisted and risked their lives. But they weren't fighting — they were filming combat.

Through the 1930s, Hollywood and the federal government held a mutual suspicion of each other. But after Pearl Harbor, the War Department asked Hollywood directors to make short documentaries that could be presented in theaters before the featured films. The ideas was to show Americans what was at stake, give them a glimpse of what our soldiers were going through and stir up patriotic feelings.

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Music
10:16 am
Mon March 3, 2014

Alvin Ailey Artistic Director Moves To Missy Elliot

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 10:39 am

Robert Battle is the artistic director of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, so music is a big part of his job. He shares the songs that move him for Tell Me More's "In Your Ear" series.

Movie Interviews
10:16 am
Mon March 3, 2014

Actress Alfre Woodard On Truthful Storytelling In '12 Years A Slave'

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 10:37 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

As we mentioned, "12 Years a Slave" had a major impact at last night's Academy Awards. The film walked away with three awards - best picture, best supporting actress for Lupita Nyong'o and best adapted screenplay for John Ridley. The film was packed with star power, including a small but provocative role for Alfre Woodard as Harriet Shaw, the slave mistress of a nearby plantation owner.

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Movies
10:16 am
Mon March 3, 2014

Best Picture Win For '12 Years A Slave' Sends New Message To Hollywood?

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 10:37 am

The Oscars brought out the glitz, glamor and gowns in Hollywood. People Magazine's movie critic Alynda Wheat recaps the evening.

Monkey See
9:54 am
Mon March 3, 2014

Stages Of Winter Rage

A man shovels snow. He's probably around the middle one of all the stages of rage, we figure. Though if he were sobbing, you couldn't see it.
Lisa Kyle Young iStockphoto

[The following is a purely speculative, hypothetical story of winter. It corresponds to no actual meteorological data.]

October 20: Eeeeeeee! Snow in the forecast! Eeeeeeee!

October 21: I saw flakes! Here's an Instagram of flakes out my window! You can't really see them, but they're there, I promise! Flakes!

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The Two-Way
5:14 am
Mon March 3, 2014

Book News: Phyllis Krasilovsky, Author Of 'The Very Little Girl,' Dies

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Monkey See
11:36 pm
Sun March 2, 2014

Oscars 2014: Low On Laughs, But A Great Speech Or Two

At Sunday's Oscar ceremony, the feel-good win of the night came when 12 Years a Slave star Lupita Nyong'o took home the supporting-actress trophy.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 6:26 am

The big winner was 12 Years a Slave, but there was quite a bit of love to go around at Sunday night's Oscars. What there wasn't, as usual, was a lot of riveting television.

Sure, there was John Travolta squinting at the teleprompter and introducing Idina Menzel (to sing the Oscar-winning Best Original Song "Let It Go," from Frozen) as — no kidding — "Adele Dazeem." And there was a fun dance number featuring Pharrell Williams and his own Oscar-nominated "Happy," which he wore a formal black version of his Grammys hat to perform.

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The Two-Way
5:15 pm
Sun March 2, 2014

'12 Years A Slave,' 'Gravity' Win Big At The Oscars

Red carpet's ready: The rope line awaits at Hollywood & Highland Center.
Christopher Polk Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 8:37 am

After several days of heavy rain in Los Angeles, the sun came out just as the 86th annual Academy Awards got underway at the Dolby Theater.

The big award of the night, for Best Picture, went to 12 Years a Slave. The film tells the harrowing tale of Solomon Northup, a free black man in New York who was sold into slavery. (See the full list of winners below.)

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Books
3:12 pm
Sun March 2, 2014

Roving Literary Death Match Aims To Breathe Life Into Literature

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 5:09 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

Picture this, a group of writers - quiet, bookish, solitary - duking it out in a fight to the death. That's the idea behind Literary Death Match, a performance series that pits authors against each other - not physically but through readings from their own books. The show travels all over the country. Reporter Alex Schmidt was at a recent performance in Los Angeles and has the story.

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Movie Interviews
3:12 pm
Sun March 2, 2014

When A Lost 'Lunchbox' Leads To Love, A Mistake Becomes A Miracle

Saajan Fernandes (Irrfan Khan) is a widower whose correspondence comes in an unlikely package — a lunchbox.
Ritesh Batra Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 5:09 pm

How many ways are there to tell a love story? More than you may think — especially in Mumbai, India, a city of millions. The Lunchbox, written and directed by Ritesh Batra, is one such story — a love that blossoms from a mistaken food delivery.

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Monkey See
6:59 am
Sun March 2, 2014

Oscar Spoiler Alert: What We Already Know About The Winners

Actress Lupita Nyong'o may very well win an Oscar Sunday night. And if she does, she will have gotten votes from people who can't be bothered to learn her name.
Gabriel Olsen Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 10:38 am

Sunday night's Oscars will include a Best Picture race that's apparently narrowed to three films: 12 Years A Slave, Gravity, and maybe American Hustle. Matthew McConaughey for Best Actor? Maybe. Or Leonardo DiCaprio? What about Cate Blanchett, a seeming shoo-in despite Meryl Streep delivering, in August Osage County, the biggest, chewiest, most Oscar-friendly performance of all time?

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Sunday Puzzle
6:03 am
Sun March 2, 2014

Let's All Go To The Lobby, To Get Ourselves A Treat

NPR

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 9:30 am

On-air challenge: Today's puzzle is called "Let's." Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or title containing the consecutive letters L-E-T. Specifically, the first word will end in L-E and the second word will start with T.

Last week's challenge: Write down these six words:

  • Cupid
  • Yoo-hoo
  • Eyeball
  • Entrance
  • Seafood
  • Wiper
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Theater
5:20 am
Sun March 2, 2014

For Kathleen Turner, Success Requires The Courage To Fail

Actress Kathleen Turner — the voice of Jessica Rabbit and the star of the steamy Body Heat on the big screen — is tackling the monumental title role in Mother Courage and Her Children at Arena Stage in Washington, D.C.
Teresa Wood Arena Stage

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 9:30 am

Kathleen Turner has been a film star and stage star, vamp and tramp, comic and deadly. It's been a long, dramatic arc for Turner, whose voice now is both as warm and furry as whiskey and as hard as the shot glass that holds it.

For the past six weeks at the Arena Stage in Washington, D.C., she's been playing the lead character in Mother Courage and her Children, the 1939 play by Berthold Brecht. Mother Courage is a war profiteer and a mother, a peasant without a country trying to calculate her chances of survival.

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Movie Interviews
5:20 am
Sun March 2, 2014

'These Birds Walk': The Story Of Pakistan's Runaway Children

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 9:30 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

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History
5:20 am
Sun March 2, 2014

Carnaval In Recife: Long History, Interesting Future

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 9:30 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden. It's Carnaval in Brazil - that time of the year when people take to the streets and celebrate before the austerity of Lent begins. And while you may think the Rio de Janeiro when you think of Carnaval, we're going to take you north to Recife. It's considered one of the most diverse carnivals in Brazil. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports from Recife.

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Photography
5:20 am
Sun March 2, 2014

'Women Of Vision': Making Pictures In All Corners Of The World

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 9:30 am

"Women of Vision: National Geographic Photographers on Assignment" is a book and exhibition. NPR's Jacki Lyden speaks with two of the featured photographers, Maggie Steber and Amy Toensing.

Europe
5:20 am
Sun March 2, 2014

'Frozen' Success Gives Norway A Potential Tourism Boost

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 9:30 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

Tonight are the Oscars, of course, which will be hosted by the musician and actor Common. One film that's up for a couple of different Oscars is Disney's box-office animated hit "Frozen," which has nominations for Best Animated Feature and Best Original Song. It's not only the folks at Disney who are hoping for a win tonight, there's also a country full of people who will be taking note.

Reporter Sidsel Overgaard explains.

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Three Books...
5:03 am
Sun March 2, 2014

Over The Hump: Three Books To Help You Through A Midlife Crisis

iStockphoto

The midlife crisis book inhabits a behemoth literary genre. It spans the feel-good fantasy of Eat, Pray, Love; the survival of "ordinary disasters" and meditation on mortality that is Martin Amis' Experience; and the chintz-patterned glasses through which Anna Quindlen envisions the padded retreat into her prime real estate-ensconced years.

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The 86th Annual Academy Awards
5:08 pm
Sat March 1, 2014

The Human Moments We Miss, Backstage At The Oscars

Every year, Entertainment Weekly writer Anthony Breznick covers the Oscars from behind the scenes.
Christopher Polk Getty Images

Picture this: You're standing on a stage. You're the center of attention in an auditorium filled with over 3,000 people. Roughly 40 million more are watching you on TV.

No, this isn't a nightmare — it's the Academy Awards. Every year, the standout members of the film industry are presented with Hollywood's highest honor: an Oscar.

But what happens after you've won the coveted gold statue? What does it feel like to walk away from the flashbulbs and fans, and step into the quiet darkness behind the curtains?

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Code Switch
3:12 pm
Sat March 1, 2014

'Mad Black Men': Yes, There Were Black People In '60s Advertising

Mad Black Men's protagonist, Ron Rapper, gets a skeptical look from the secretary on his first day in the office.
Mad Black Men

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 11:23 pm

When Mad Men first premiered on AMC in 2007, Xavier Ruffin — a young, African-American graphic designer from Milwaukee, Wisc. — really wanted to like it.

"I wanted to be a fan of it when it first came out," Ruffin tells NPR's Arun Rath. "I just had my own personal differences. Not liking the way blacks were represented in their universe. I just couldn't get over it."

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Business
7:50 am
Sat March 1, 2014

A Picket Line At The Oscars: Visual-Effects Artists To Protest

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 9:37 am

Hundreds of visual-effects artists are planning to picket the Academy Awards on Sunday for the second year in a row. They're hoping to bring attention to what's been happening in their industry.

The field is losing jobs and relocating to countries with bigger subsidies for employers. It's the result of a technical revolution that's changed the profession since it kicked off in the 70s with Star Wars creator George Lucas' visual-effects company, Industrial Light and Magic.

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Monkey See
6:02 am
Sat March 1, 2014

Nine Best Picture Nominees, Many Funny Faces, And A Couple Of Bonus Features

NPR

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 3:33 am

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Author Interviews
5:56 am
Sat March 1, 2014

With Teens And Social Media, Lack Of Context Is Everything

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 9:03 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

You know, as I host this program, I'm on a social media platform - Twitter, as a matter of fact. There is no group that takes that new social media platform more than teenagers, and that's exactly what worries a lot of parents. Danah Boyd is a respected researcher in the world of social media. She spent years studying teenagers and how they interact online. Her findings are in a new book called "It's Complicated." In this encore broadcast, NPR's Elizabeth Blair reports.

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Arts & Life
5:56 am
Sat March 1, 2014

Web Series On Theater Turns Drama Into Comedy

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 9:03 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

"Submissions Only" is a backstage comedy - in fact, it goes so far backstage, it goes into the auditions. It's the story of eager, hopeful actors, hectored and hectoring agents, and demanding casting directors who work just around the corner from Broadway.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (as character) Hey, Pen, I went on theater burn and wrote I don't care who's directing "Jeremy's Fort," as long as Penny Riley is still in it. She's going to be fierce.

KATE WETHERHEAD: (as Penny) Aw. And then did everybody write Penny who?

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