Arts

The Salt
9:48 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Edible Bonsai: East Meets West On These Cookie Canvases

Risa Hirai's bonsai cookies are made from sugar, flour, butter and egg. They're completely edible as long as they haven't been on display for too long.
Courtesy of Galerie Tokyo Humanité

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 3:37 pm

Risa Hirai is a Japanese artist who paints detailed images of bonsai trees and Japanese meals. But instead of using paint on a canvas, she works with icing on a cookie.

The 23-year-old is a senior at Tama Art University in Tokyo whose mouthwatering works will be exhibited at Gallery Tokyo Humanite all this week. Assistant director Maie Tsukuda tells The Salt it's the gallery's first cookie exhibit and notes that it's not an ordinary medium for artists.

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The Two-Way
6:16 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Book News: Amazon Tries To Claim '.book' Domain; Publishers Fight Back

Seattle-based Amazon wants control over new Internet domains such as ".book," ".author" and ".read."
Lionel Bonaventure AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 6:52 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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New In Paperback
5:03 am
Mon March 11, 2013

March 11-17: A Family Reunion, A Hunted Werewolf, A Military Standoff

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 1:32 pm

Fiction and nonfiction softcover releases from Jeanette Winterson, Mark Haddon, Glen Duncan and Joydeep Roy-Bhattacharya.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Art & Design
2:41 am
Mon March 11, 2013

For John Baldessari, Conceptual Art Means Serious Mischief

Courtesy the artist/John Baldessari Studio

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 12:14 pm

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Author Interviews
2:40 am
Mon March 11, 2013

'Lean In': Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg Explains What's Holding Women Back

Courtesy Knopf

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 2:37 pm

Of all the posters plastered around Facebook's Silicon Valley headquarters — "Move Fast and Break Things," "Done Is Better Than Perfect" and "Fail Harder" — Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg has a favorite: "What Would You Do If You Weren't Afraid?"

"[It's] something that I think is really important and I think very motivating," Sandberg tells NPR's Renee Montagne. " ... I wrote in my book, what I would do if I wasn't afraid is, I would speak out more on behalf of women."

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Theater
3:01 pm
Sun March 10, 2013

'The Last Five Years' Returns To New York

Adam Kantor and Betsy Woolfe star in the current off-Broadway revival of Jason Robert Brown's The Last Five Years.
The Hartman Group / Second Stage Theatre

The Last Five Years originally ran off-Broadway in 2002. Cited as one of Time magazine's "Ten Best of 2001," it won Drama Desk awards for Best Music and Best Lyrics.

There are only two characters in the musical, Jamie and Cathy. Jamie is a young novelist and Cathy is a struggling actress. Told in reverse chronological order, the drama shows what happens when an artistic couple's romance fizzles out.

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Author Interviews
3:01 pm
Sun March 10, 2013

A Twin Carries On Alone In 'Her: A Memoir'

Christa and Cara Parravani were identical twins. When they were 28, Cara died of a drug overdose, and Christa spiraled into depression.

In her new book, Her: A Memoir, Christa explores their bond of sisterhood, which went beyond blood into the elliptical world of twinhood.

Both were artists, one a writer and the other a photographer. Both married young. Both lived through a hardscrabble childhood with a troubled mother. But Cara's path diverged after she was attacked and raped at age 24.

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You Must Read This
4:21 am
Sun March 10, 2013

Darkness Visible: 'He Died With His Eyes Open' Is A Crime Novel Like No Other

A.L. Kennedy's latest novel is The Blue Book.

I've read He Died With His Eyes Open twice. I don't know if I could stand to read it again. Like all of Derek Raymond's work, it has a remarkable and disturbing physicality.

This book was the first of what came to be known as the Factory series. Its protagonist is an unnamed detective in London's Metropolitan Police. He will never rise above sergeant and works in the most despised branch of "the Factory": Unexplained Deaths.

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Arts & Life
3:39 am
Sun March 10, 2013

It's 'Literally' In The Dictionary

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 9:20 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're going to take a moment now to talk about a word - yep, one word. Maybe you use it all the time or maybe you feel people use the word and it drives you up the wall. I'm talking about the word literally.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Author Interviews
3:39 am
Sun March 10, 2013

Rita Moreno Reflects On Anita, Awards And Accents

Rita Moreno won an Academy Award in 1962 for her role as Anita in West Side Story.
AP

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 11:55 am

You could hardly design a better Hollywood success story than that of powerhouse Rita Moreno: Born Rosa Dolores Alverio in Puerto Rico, she arrived in New York when she was 5 years old. Over the years, she became a talented dancer and ended up in Hollywood, making her mark in musicals like Singin' in the Rain and The King and I before winning an Oscar for her unforgettable turn as Anita in West Side Story.

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Author Interviews
3:39 am
Sun March 10, 2013

Novel Explores 'Silence' And 'Roar' Of Life In A Place Like Syria

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 9:20 am

The Silence and the Roar follows a young man living in an unnamed Middle Eastern country that is in chaos. The book doesn't explicitly take place in Syria, but the similarities between its setting and author Nihad Sirees' home country are undeniable.

Sirees' work has been banned from publication in Syria, where he's considered an opponent of the government — another point at which Sirees' story and that of his protagonist, Fathi Chin, intersect.

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Sunday Puzzle
10:33 pm
Sat March 9, 2013

From A To Z

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 9:20 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a word containing an A and a Z. Given anagrams of the remaining letters, name the word. For example, given "leg," the answer would be "glaze".

Last week's challenge: Eight people are seated at a circular table. Each person gets up and sits down again — either in the same chair or in the chair immediately to the left or right of the one they were in. How many different ways can the eight people be re-seated?

Answer: 49

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Pop Culture
10:03 pm
Sat March 9, 2013

Thirty Years Later, Still 'A Good-Old-Boy Thing'

James Best played Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane, the bumbling minion of Jefferson Davis "Boss" Hogg, a corrupt county commissioner and the show's Big Bad. Rosco's dog Flash was played by a basset hound named Sandy.
CBS Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 9:43 am

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Three-Minute Fiction
4:49 pm
Sat March 9, 2013

Three-Minute Fiction: The Round 10 Winner Is ...

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Lisa Rubenson of Charlotte, N.C., wrote our Round 10 winning story, "Sorry for Your Loss."
Courtesy of Lisa Rubenson

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 4:26 am

Did you leave a message after our prompt? For Round 10 of Three-Minute Fiction, we asked you to submit a short story in the form of a voice mail message. For this contest, the original fiction must be read in about three minutes, no more than 600 words.

After four weeks and more than 4,000 stories, we have a winner.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
2:56 pm
Sat March 9, 2013

The Movie Emily Spivey Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Dolly Parton in a scene from the film 9 to 5.
Archive Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 9, 2013 4:04 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Jazz
1:22 pm
Sat March 9, 2013

Tadd Dameron, A Jazz Master With A 'Lyrical Grace'

Tadd Dameron (smiling at center) was an important figure in American jazz and bebop. He is shown here with Fats Navarro on trumpet, and Charlie Rouse and Ernie Henry on saxophone.
William Gottlieb Library of Congress

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 4:30 am

In the 1940s and '50s, Tadd Dameron worked with everyone who was anyone in jazz, from Miles Davis to Artie Shaw, Count Basie to John Coltrane. Everything Dameron touched had one thing in common, says Paul Combs, author of Dameronia: The Life and Work of Tadd Dameron.

"A penchant for lyricism," Combs says. "Almost everything that he writes has a very lyrical grace to it."

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Art & Design
5:10 am
Sat March 9, 2013

Painter Llyn Foulkes Creates On The Fringes Of The Art World

Originally published on Sat March 9, 2013 6:18 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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The Salt
4:15 am
Sat March 9, 2013

Career Suicide Or Lifesaver? Why A Professional Foodie Went Vegetarian

Washington Post food editor Joe Yonan has made the decision to go vegetarian.
Cristian Baitg iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat March 9, 2013 3:53 pm

It takes an adventurous palate to be a food journalist, who must sample and judge from a wide world of cuisines. So it's understandable why some chefs and foodies might be suspicious of a food editor who decides to cut himself off from a broad swath of eating possibilities by becoming vegetarian.

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Author Interviews
3:40 am
Sat March 9, 2013

Living A Life Of Joy 'Until I Say Good-Bye'

Cover of Until I Say Goodbye

Originally published on Sat March 9, 2013 6:18 am

Susan Spencer-Wendel knows how to spend a year.

She left her job as an award-winning criminal courts reporter for The Palm Beach Post and went to the Yukon to see the northern lights. Then to Cyprus, to meet family that she never knew. She and her husband, John, took their children on trips on which her daughter got to try on wedding dresses and Susan got kissed by a dolphin.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
8:05 pm
Fri March 8, 2013

Secretary Of Education Arne Duncan Plays Not My Job

Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 9, 2013 8:50 am

Arne Duncan is President Obama's secretary of education, and if, while he's on this show, a disaster befalls the president, the vice president, the speaker of the House and every other member of the Cabinet except Veterans Affairs and Homeland Security, he would be president.

We've invited Duncan to play a game called "Now, don't be fresh ... I just take dictation!" Three questions for the secretary of education about the education of secretaries.

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Author Interviews
11:59 am
Fri March 8, 2013

Al Gore Envisions 'The Future'

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

My next guest really needs almost no introduction. He's former vice president of the United States. He's one of the most well-known communicators of the risks of climate change. He shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize for those efforts. I'm guessing a lot of you have read his book, "An Inconvenient Truth," or you've seen the movie.

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Arts
9:15 am
Fri March 8, 2013

FOCUS ON CAMPUS: Electricidad


Louie talks with Rebecca Rivas, director of the UTEP Department of Theatre & Dance's upcoming production, "Electricidad" by Luis Alfaro.  The play is a modern re-telling of the Sophocles play "Electra" set in the gangland world of East L.A.   Rivas talks about what audiences can expect at these performances, which take place March 13-16 at 8 p.m., and March 17 at 2:30 & 7 p.m., at the UTEP Fox Fine Arts Studio Theatre (1st floor, Fox Fine Arts Building).  Rebecca Rivas is a Visiting Assistant Professor at the Department of Theatre & Dance.  Aired March 8, 2013.

NPR Story
8:01 am
Fri March 8, 2013

Peering Into Space

In this episode, TED speakers look up to the night sky and consider our relationship with what might out there.
TED

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 12:43 pm

Gazing up at the night sky is simultaneously humbling and utterly thrilling. This hour, we'll hear from TED speakers who share an infectious sense of wonder and curiosity about our place in the universe and what lies beyond our skies.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

TED Radio Hour
8:00 am
Fri March 8, 2013

How Did A Mistake Unlock One Of Space's Mysteries?

Nobel Prize winner Saul Perlmutter explains part of his research in astrophysics.
Kimberly White/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 8:24 am

Part 1 of TED Radio Hour episode Peering Into Space.

Physicist Brian Greene explains how the prevailing theories about the fabric of space changed dramatically in the last century — twice. The most recent shift in thinking came about from a strange mistake, and revealed hidden truths about the nature of our universe. Later in this episode, Greene talks more about why this discovery hints at the existence of other universes.

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TED Radio Hour
8:00 am
Fri March 8, 2013

How Can We Defend Earth From Asteroids?

Phil Plait knows the secrets to avoiding a big asteroid catastrophe.
Courtesy of TED

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 8:24 am

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Peering Into Space.

About Phil Plait's TED Talk

What's six miles wide and can end civilization in an instant? An asteroid — and there are lots of them out there. With humor and great visuals, Phil Plait enthralls the TEDxBoulder audience with all the ways asteroids can kill, and what we must do to avoid them.

About Phil Plait

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TED Radio Hour
8:00 am
Fri March 8, 2013

Are We Alone In The Universe?

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"We should search because it tells us how to collaborate our place in the cosmos." — Jill Tarter
TED / James Duncan Davidson

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 8:24 am

About Jill Tarter's TED Talk

The SETI Institute's Jill Tarter wants to accelerate our search for cosmic company. Using a growing array of radio telescopes, she and her team listen for patterns that may be a sign of intelligence elsewhere in the universe.

About Jill Tarter

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Theater
10:01 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

For Berry Gordy, Broadway Is Memory Lane

Valisia LeKae, Sydney Morton and Ariana Debose play the Supremes in the show.
Andrew Eccles

Originally published on Fri March 8, 2013 9:50 am

There's hardly an adult anywhere in the world who wouldn't recognize at least some of the music of Motown.

The R&B label changed the course of music in the United States and made household names of Diana Ross, Stevie Wonder and The Jackson 5. Now, the man who created Motown — Berry Gordy — is headed to Broadway to tell his version of how it all began.

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Theater
4:13 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

August Wilson's Words Get New Life In Monologue Contest

Branndin Laramore (from left), Brian Weddington, Lia Miller and Ernesto Moreta pose after a recent rehearsal for the Chicago finals of the August Wilson Monologue Competition.
Cheryl Corley NPR

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 5:40 pm

When the stage lights go up at Chicago's Goodman Theatre on Monday evening, more than 20 high school students will each have a moment to step into the spotlight and perform a monologue from one of the plays written by the late August Wilson. Chicago's contest is one of several regional finals that strives to introduce students to the Pulitzer Prize winner's work. It's also a lead-up to the national August Wilson Monologue Competition that will be held on Broadway later this spring.

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Movie Reviews
3:54 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

Was Japan's Hirohito Guilty? 'Emperor' Has No Clue

Gen. Bonner Fellers (Matthew Fox) is the cheerless, angsty romantic lead in a historical drama that could have leaned more toward accuracy in its depiction of post-war Japan.
Kirsty Griffin Roadside Attractions

You'd think that in telling a story whose novelty is in its veracity, retaining some semblance of that truth might be important. But wrestling history into narrative has its challenges, and things can get hazy when it comes to the facts in a historical drama. So it seems like the next logical step in telling a story with a relationship to truth might be that if you're going to fudge things, at least make it entertaining. Please, pull an Argo.

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Food
3:20 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

Finding Flavor In The Castoff Carrot Top

Carrots' leafy green tops usually end up in the trash. Not so fast, says cookbook author Diane Morgan, who uses the frilly leaves to make a pesto.
Courtesy of Diane Morgan

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 4:48 pm

Cookbook author Diane Morgan first got to thinking about root vegetables after two encounters at her local farmers market in Portland, Ore. She was burdened down with celery root, Morgan says, when a woman stopped her to ask what she was holding and what she planned to do with it.

"It's amazing," Morgan replied. "You can eat it raw, you can eat it cooked, you can turn it into a fabulous soup."

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