Arts

Sunday Puzzle
1:29 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Take Your Pics

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:32 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name in which the first word starts with the letters P-I and the second word starts with C. For example, given "One of 27 compositions by Mozart" you would say "(Pi)ano (C)oncerto."

Last week's challenge: Think of two familiar three-word sayings in which all three words are the same length. The middle word in both sayings is the same. In each saying, the first and last words rhyme with each other. What two sayings are these?

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Author Interviews
3:03 pm
Sat March 16, 2013

Hatmaker Philip Treacy's Favorite Hat, And Many More

In the studio, Feb. 10, 1999
Kevin Davies Phaidon

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 8:32 am

In 2011, Irish milliner Philip Treacy made waves across the world when he designed 36 different hats for the royal wedding. Remember Princess Beatrice's unforgettable hat? Treacy made that.

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The Salt
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Wine Revolution: As Drinkers And Growers, U.S. Declares Independence

The vineyard at Round Pond Estate in Rutherford, Calif. Napa Valley is just one of wine-growing regions across the country.
Eric Risberg AP

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 10:46 am

A curious shift has happened in global wine-drinking trends: Americans have overtaken the French and Italians, Europe's traditional lovers of the fruits of the vine, as the world's top wine market.

And it's not just wine drinking that's taken off stateside: U.S. wine production is also on the rise.

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Author Interviews
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Lack Of Conscience Gets A Comeuppance In 'The Accursed'

Courtesy Ecco

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 5:46 am

Something suspicious is going on in Princeton, N.J., in the otherwise sleepy year of 1905. Children turn into stone. Spouses disappear into horse-drawn carriages. Snakes squirm up and down walls. Is it some kind of curse? What could the good people of Princeton have possibly done to bring a curse on themselves?

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Author Interviews
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

A Little Blue Alien Helped Hemon Bear Witness To His 'Lives'

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 5:46 am

Since his 2000 literary debut, Aleksandar Hemon has been hailed as "a maestro, a conjurer, a channeler of universes." In books including The Question of Bruno and Love and Obstacles, he's written about archdukes and exiles; a Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina of memories; and a Chicago that's in your face.

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Movie Interviews
2:03 am
Sat March 16, 2013

'Leviathan': The Fishing Life, From 360 Degrees

The noisy film is mostly wordless, with animals and nature filling in the blanks between its strangely stark images.
The Cinema Guild

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 5:46 am

Leviathan is a documentary — and yet not a documentary. It's a near-wordless, almost abstract depiction of an 80-foot groundfishing boat heading out of New Bedford, Mass. The film's unusual structure and point of view has gotten rave reviews at festivals and from many critics.

Sometimes you don't know quite what you're seeing and listening to in Leviathan. You hear metal groaning and rasping, see fish, gloves and tools tossed about on a boat that's pitching and rolling in a roaring wind.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
3:41 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Singer Huey Lewis Plays Not My Job

Courtesy Huey Lewis

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 8:29 am

In honor of their 30th anniversary, the 1980s band Huey Lewis and the News is re-releasing their iconic album, Sports.

We've invited Lewis to play a game called "You call yourself a newsman?" Three questions about interesting journalistic mistakes.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Ask Me Another
8:55 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Accidental Science

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 8:42 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Now, let's welcome back to the ASK ME ANOTHER hot seat, our VIP Jad Abumrad.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Jad, were you sweating it out backstage?

JAD ABUMRAD: Some of this stuff is abusively hard.

EISENBERG: Abusively hard. I don't think it's not...

ABUMRAD: No, no, it's fine. It's all good quizzical fun.

EISENBERG: Good quizzical fun.

ABUMRAD: Yes.

EISENBERG: You're ready.

ABUMRAD: I'm ready.

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NPR Story
8:31 am
Fri March 15, 2013

He Blinded Me With Science

Very Important Puzzler) and host of the public radio show Radiolab." href="/post/he-blinded-me-science" class="noexit lightbox">
"I feel sort of like a vampire would feel. I want to suck the blood of science and dispose of the corpse." - Jad Abumrad, this week's V.I.P. (that's Very Important Puzzler) and host of the public radio show Radiolab.
Josh Rogosin NPR

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 8:12 am

Science takes center stage this week as we play games about scientific discoveries both intentional and accidental. We'll get brainy with our Very Important Puzzler, Jad Abumrad, host of WNYC's Radiolab, as he talks about his quest to become a science vampire. Plus, we roll the dice on clues about our favorite board games and find out the premises of fake TV show adaptations, from Finding Emo to Oy! Story.

TED Radio Hour
8:11 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Is The Human Hand Our Best Technology?

"Only the hand can tell where it's tender, where the patient winces." — Abraham Verghese
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 9:58 am

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Do We Need Humans?

About Abraham Verghese's TEDTalk

Modern medicine is in danger of losing a powerful, old-fashioned tool: human touch. Physician and writer Abraham Verghese describes our strange new world where patients are data points, and calls for a return to the traditional physical exam.

About Abraham Verghese

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NPR Story
8:00 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Do We Need Humans?

Can we improve technology and preserve human dignity?
Thinkstock

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 12:46 pm

We've been promised a future where robots will be our friends. But are we ready for how those innovations will change us as humans? In this episode, TED speakers consider the promises and perils of our relationship with technology.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Movie Reviews
3:18 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

'Ginger & Rosa': Life And Times In Cold War London

Rosa (Alice Englert) and her sometime best friend Ginger (Elle Fanning) are nearly torn apart by the political and social changes of the 1960s.
Nicola Dove A24

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 6:19 pm

Two young actresses with substantial Hollywood pedigrees have the title roles in the new film Ginger & Rosa. Ginger is played by Dakota Fanning's sister, Elle, who at 14 already has more than 30 movie credits. Rosa is played by Alice Englert, daughter of Oscar-winning writer-director Jane Campion and star of last month's Beautiful Creatures. Both actresses get a chance to stretch in Ginger & Rosa.

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Movie Reviews
3:04 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

'The Call': Not The Best Connection

LAPD 911 operator Jordan Turner (Halle Berry) hopes to turn a fatal failure into a final victory after a serial killer tries to claim a second young victim on her watch.
Greg Gayne TriStar Pictures

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 8:43 am

In the buildup to the climax of Brad Anderson's The Call, a character discovers what the film's villain has been doing with all the teenage girls he's been kidnapping and killing. It's a grisly revelation, and it's played for shock value — both for the audience and for the character making the discovery.

There's only one problem: Early in the film, the body of one of these girls is recovered. So the details of the killer's M.O. shouldn't come as any shock whatsoever to the character that discovers his lair.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

'Burt Wonderstone': Vegas, When The Magic Stops

Anton Marvelton (Steve Buscemi) and Burt Wonderstone (Steve Carell) are Vegas magicians whose gimmicky, vintage-style act is no match for their modern audiences.
Ben Glass Warner Bros. Pictures

There are some funny bits and characters around the edges of The Incredible Burt Wonderstone, but its core is empty of humor. In fact, this purported satire of Las Vegas magicians is a three-void circus: the script, the central character and the main performance.

The committee-written screenplay begins with the premise that, 20 years after the illusion-busting Penn and Teller set up in Vegas, there could still be a market for a pair of old-school tricksters who call themselves Burt Wonderstone and Anton Marvelton.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

'60s Japan, Aglow 'From Up On Poppy Hill'

In 1963 Japan, Shun (voiced by Anton Yelchin) and Umi (Sarah Bolger) unite to preserve a beloved old building that serves as a clubhouse for young intellectuals at their seaside community school.
Gkids

Of the many wonderful qualities associated with the films of Studio Ghibli — the Japanese animation house co-founded by Hiyao Miyazaki, the visionary director of My Neighbor Totoro, Kiki's Delivery Service and Spirited Away — serenity may be the most key. Ghibli productions offer the stirring adventures and magical creatures of their American counterparts, and often operate by a wondrously mysterious internal logic, but they do so without feeling compelled to grab a young audience by the lapels.

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Food
2:12 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Molly Malone: A Soup And Song For St. Patrick's Day

Rachel Allen's recipe for Molly Malone's Cockle and Mussel Chowder derives its name from a popular Irish folk song.
David Loftus

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 4:48 pm

There's always the temptation of heading to an Irish pub, grabbing a pint of Guinness and chowing down on some cabbage and potatoes when March 17 rolls around.

However, there's much more to Irish cuisine than that, says Rachel Allen, a well-known TV chef in Ireland who is appreciated for her simple, doable recipes that champion the country's fresh produce, meats and seafood.

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Author Interviews
1:24 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Two Awards In One Day For 'Battleborn' Author Claire Vaye Watkins

Claire Vaye Watkins' debut collection of short stories — Battleborn — is informed by her childhood in the West.
Riverhead Books

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 2:19 pm

The 10 stories in Claire Vaye Watkins' debut collection — Battleborn — explore the past and present of the American West, specifically Nevada, where Watkins spent much of her childhood and adolescence. On Wednesday, it was announced that the 28-year-old author had won two major literary prizes for Battleborn: the $10,000 Rosenthal Family Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the $20,000 Story Prize.

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Arts & Life
12:44 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

How Dictionary Searches Define Readers

After Vice President Joe Biden used the term "malarkey" in a 2012 debate, searches for the word in online dictionaries surged. Now that dictionaries are readily available with a mouse click or finger tap, dictionary publishers can track the correlation between word searches and current events.

Ask Me Another
11:12 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Submit It In Reduplicate

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 8:42 am

Did you know Ke$ha's song "Tik Tok" demonstrates a linguistic oddity? And we're not talking about her spelling. "Reduplicated" words contain repeated syllables, but with different vowel sounds. Puzzle guru Art Chung leads contestants in a game full of reduplicated word pairs, so quit your "chit-chat" and listen in!

Plus, guest music duo Paul & Storm play an extra-special cover of "Splish-Splash."

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Ask Me Another
11:12 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Jad Abumrad: Accidental Scientist

Jad Abumrad.
Marco Lau

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 9:01 am

  • Listen to Jad play "Accidental Science"
  • Listen To The Interview

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Ask Me Another
11:12 am
Thu March 14, 2013

For Your I's Only

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 8:42 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Finally, it's what our contestants have been waiting for. Let's bring back our winners to play our Ask Me One More final round.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: From Got Game, we have Max Bernstein. From Blinding Me With Science: Katie Hamill. From Submit It In Reduplicate: Matt Stefani. From Small Screen Adaptations: Brian Devinney. And from Long Before They Were Famous: Megan Schade.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Art Chung, what do you have in store for us?

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Ask Me Another
11:12 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Long Before They Were Famous

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 8:42 am

A long time ago, many people's surnames indicated their occupations. If your name was "Mason," you worked with stone, if your name was "Coleman," you worked with coal, and if your name was "Sanders," you ran a medieval chicken empire. Guest musicians Paul & Storm hint contestants to an occupational surname and a celebrity who bears it.

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Ask Me Another
11:12 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Got Game

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 8:42 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Let's bring up our two brave contestants: Sid Solomon and Max Bernstein.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Welcome, Sid. Welcome, Max. So, Max, you are a PhD student in biology.

MAX BERNSTEIN: I am.

EISENBERG: I'm very impressed.

BERNSTEIN: Oh, thank you.

EISENBERG: What are you working on right now, may I ask? What's your project?

BERNSTEIN: I work on population genetics and evolution in microscopic worms.

EISENBERG: No idea what you're talking about, but that sounds crazy.

(LAUGHTER)

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Ask Me Another
11:12 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Small Screen Adaptations

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 8:42 am

TV shows are sometimes based on popular films, and while some are successful (Buffy The Vampire Slayer) others...not so much (Spaceballs: The Animated Series). Host Ophira Eisenberg has a few of her own ideas in this game, where players must "adapt" movie titles into shorter series versions by removing a letter to form a new, more succinct title.

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Ask Me Another
11:12 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Blinded Me With Science

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 8:42 am

Guest troubadours Paul & Storm have emerged from their lab to share their latest experiment. To pay tribute to Thomas Dolby's 1982 New Wave classic "She Blinded Me With Science," the duo has reworked the lyrics to describe different scientific principles and discoveries. So put on your safety goggles and play along!

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Movies
9:33 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Whatever Happened To The Real Gingers And Rosas?

The '60s London of the unhappy adolescent Ginger (Elle Fanning, with Annette Bening's mentoring May) was more complicated than students Ginger's age understand today. Film writer Ella Taylor, who lived through that decade, came late to an understanding of the toll it took on young women like Ginger.
A24

A few weeks ago, I asked a class of college undergraduates what the 1960s meant to them.

"That flower-power thing?" one young man volunteered brightly.

The further we get from that misunderstood decade, the more the many strands of its rebelliousness get reduced to a pop-culture T-shirt slogan, a cartoon strip starring tie-dyed youth with stoned eyes and floor-mop hair.

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Movie Reviews
8:38 am
Thu March 14, 2013

In 'Philip Roth: Unmasked,' An Unadorned Portrait Of An Aging Master

Novelist Phillip Roth steers clear of provocation in the PBS documentary Philip Roth: Unmasked; he comes across, rather, as sensible, sensitive, maybe a bit cranky but hardly outrageous at all. And his unmistakable voice will ring true, especially for fans.
Eric Thayer Reuters

There's nothing particularly dynamic about Livia Manera and William Karel's documentary Philip Roth: Unmasked. For some 90 minutes, it's pretty much just one guy talking. But what a guy!

Roth is one of the greatest living novelists, possibly even the greatest. He can also be an inflammatory presence, eliciting outrage almost as much as admiration, particularly among women who see him as a misogynist.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Tender Portraits Of Worn-Down Women In 'This Close'

promo image
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 12:43 pm

Jessica Francis Kane drew considerable attention for her artful historic novel, The Report, which explored the repercussions of a tragic incident in March 1943, when 173 people died while rushing into the Bethnal Green tube station for shelter during an air raid. Her portraits of wartime Londoners were psychologically acute and rich in evocative detail. She applies that same skill to her second collection, This Close, populated by 21st century Americans adrift in an increasingly complicated world.

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Author Interviews
10:44 am
Wed March 13, 2013

A Young Man Gets 'Filthy Rich' Boiling, Bottling Tap Water

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 11:16 am

In his new novel, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, Mohsin Hamid's nameless protagonist is an ambitious young man who moves from the countryside to a megalopolis in search of his fortune. The city is modeled on Lahore, Pakistan, where Hamid was born and partly raised and where — after living in the United States and England — he has now settled with his family.

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Wisdom Watch
9:57 am
Wed March 13, 2013

Write A Little Everyday, You'll Have A Book

Samantha Loomis Paterson

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 9:51 am

Katherine Paterson is the beloved author of many young adult novels, including Jacob Have I Loved, The Great Gilly Hopkins and Bridge to Terabithia.

The American Library Association recently honored her with the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for her "substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children."

Paterson, who has been writing for a half-century, tells NPR's Michel Martin that despite all the awards she has received throughout the years, this one means a lot.

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