Arts

Television
2:22 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

The Return of 'Rectify,' A Critical Darling Sprung From Death Row

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 5:08 pm

Rectify is a dark, contemplative TV drama about a man released from prison after two decades on death row. It was also a critical favorite in its first season. For a glimpse into its creation, NPR's Elizabeth Blair talks to show creator Ray McKinnon and actors Aden Young and Abigail Spencer.

Sports
12:31 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

What Does Body Ink Say About NBA Players' Pain And Personalities?

Wilson Chandler of the Denver Nuggets has cartoons all over his legs.
Jack Dempsey AP

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 12:55 pm

Ethan Swan, who runs an art gallery in downtown Los Angeles, believes that "so much of art is about the creation of meaning through image." He also believes that "tattoos are a great way to mark pain."

So Swan is naturally interested in how body ink plays out for others. It's become what he admits is a quest.

As the founder of the blog NBA Tattoos, Swan tells NPR's Michel Martin that in 2010, he got a new cable package and started watching a lot of basketball.

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The Two-Way
5:36 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Book News: Author Of Sci-Fi Classic 'Flowers For Algernon' Dies

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 8:57 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Books
4:49 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Weiner Takes A Tumble With 'All Fall Down'

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 9:27 am

Allison Weiss has a handsome husband, a big house, a successful career and a worsening prescription pill addiction.

At first, Allison's pill habit is decidedly well-mannered: She takes an Oxy before dealing with the snobby parents from her daughter's private school or mean comments on a newspaper feature about her. But suddenly, under the pressure of a screaming 5-year-old, a father with Alzheimer's and a distant husband, the pills become a necessity and Allison ends up in rehab.

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Author Interviews
2:06 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

From 'The Magic Tree House,' Kids Branch Out To Chapter Books

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 9:19 am

When Mary Pope Osborne wrote the first set of stories in the Magic Tree House series in 1992, she had a contract for four books, and she figured that would be it. But then she began getting letters from teachers, parents and kids.

"Those letters are priceless," she says. "I've memorized so many of them, like: 'Dear Mrs. Osborne, Your books almost made me smart!' or 'Dear Mrs. Osborne, I'm working on my own novel. ... It's not finished yet, it's scary, it's called The Septic System.'"

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The Salt
1:06 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

In 'My Name Is Salt,' The Toil And Joy Of India's Salt Harvest

The work of harvesting salt, portrayed in the documentary My Name Is Salt, is difficult. But there's also a certain pride that comes with doing it well.
Leafbird Films

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 3:24 pm

The little white crystals are on every table at every meal, from fine dining restaurants to roadside diners to the family dinner table, ready to bring even the most hum-drum foods to life.

But you may never look at them the same way again after watching My Name Is Salt, a slow burn of a documentary that made its North American debut in mid June at the Los Angeles Film Festival.

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Author Interviews
12:36 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

Joshua Ferris Takes On Atheism In 'To Rise Again'

Joshua Ferris has written two other novels — The Unnamed and Then We Came to the End.
Beowulf Sheehan Courtesy of Little, Brown and Co.

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 2:11 pm

Staring into the mouths of his patients all day, the dentist in Joshua Ferris' new novel, To Rise Again at a Decent Hour, becomes obsessed with decay and death. He wishes he had religious faith and could believe in something larger than himself, but to him church is "a dark bus station of the soul."

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Movies
10:34 am
Tue June 17, 2014

Man Freed After Confessing To Killing Son During Interrogation

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
9:21 am
Tue June 17, 2014

Man Emerges From Picasso's Painting 'The Blue Room'

Scientists and art experts found a hidden painting beneath one of Picasso's first masterpieces, The Blue Room, thanks to advances in infrared technology. Here, associate conservator Patricia Favero of The Phillips Collection points to a detail in the image.
Evan Vucci AP

A bearded man lurks beneath the surface of a famous Picasso painting. That's the image brought to us by curators who used new technology to find details of a portrait the artist painted over when he created his famous The Blue Room in 1901.

The painting's surface depicts a scene in Pablo Picasso's studio in Paris, with a woman bathing between a window and a table. But a different scene lies underneath, as infrared and other analysis shows a man in a bow tie staring out from the canvas, his head propped on his hand.

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The Two-Way
5:30 am
Tue June 17, 2014

Book News: Apple Settles In E-Book Price-Fixing Lawsuit

The Apple logo hangs outside San Francisco's Moscone Center earlier this month during the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 7:21 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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NPR Story
3:33 am
Tue June 17, 2014

The Human Heart And Its Rhythmic Magnificence

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 6:18 am

Rhythm comes in different forms from music and poetry to those inside our bodies. There's art based on the most primal rhythm of all: the beating of the human heart.

Book Your Trip
3:10 am
Tue June 17, 2014

Book Your Trip: Because Reading Is About The Journey

Book Your Trip with NPR this summer. We've got recommendations for literary travel by train, plane, car, bike, boat, foot, city transit, horse, balloon, rocketship, time machine and even giant peach.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 7:46 am

WHAT, you might ask, is Anna Karenina doing on the same summer reading list as The Little Engine That Could?

Let me explain.

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The Salt
2:41 am
Tue June 17, 2014

In Yabbies And Cappuccino, A Culinary Lifeline For Aboriginal Youth

Australian celebrity chef and author Kylie Kwong (left) teaches a cooking workshop at Yaama Dhiyaan, a cooking and hospitality school for at-risk aborginal youth.
The Kitchen Sisters

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 3:48 pm

If you teach an aboriginal man (or woman) to make a cappuccino, can you feed his career for a lifetime?

That's the hope at Yaama Dhiyaan, a cooking and hospitality school for at-risk indigenous young people in Australia.

Students there are learning the skills to be cooks, restaurant and hotel workers, and caterers. The school is also helping to reconnect them to their culture, disrupted when many of their grandparents were kidnapped off the land, forced into missionary schools and denied the right to vote until the 1960s.

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Arts & Life
2:40 am
Tue June 17, 2014

Eccentric Heiress's Untouched Treasures Head For The Auction Block

Huguette Clark in 1930. She had a mansion in Connecticut that was never occupied, and her New York apartments were kept up, unoccupied, for more than 20 years.
AP

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 9:16 am

She had three apartments on New York's Fifth Avenue, all filled with treasures worth millions, not to mention a mansion in Connecticut and a house in California. But the enigmatic heiress Huguette Clark lived her last 20 years in a plainly decorated hospital room — even though she wasn't sick.

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Book Reviews
4:04 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

'The Unwitting' Explores The Lure Of Complicity

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 6:20 pm

I confess that I never did make it past the first few episodes of the universally acclaimed TV series Mad Men. For all its stylistic innovation (yes, the clothes were great), the casual, relentless misogyny, even if artfully crafted, was exhausting. I had read Jacqueline Susann's Valley of the Dolls as a teenager, and it always seemed sensible to me that so many women took to "little helpers" to see them through those dark ages.

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The Salt
2:04 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The B50 Burger

The B50 Burger — as in, you won't live to be 50.
NPR

Ever since Eli Whitney invented the Beef Gin in 1793, hamburgers have basically been the same: an all-beef patty, eaten as quickly as possible. But now, new technologies are allowing burgerologists to expand the medium. Chef's Burger Bistro in Chicago has created the B50 Burger, with a patty that's 50 percent ground beef, 50 percent ground bacon. And then there's a fried egg thrown on top, just for fun.

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Interviews
1:43 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

'Fargo' TV Series Captures The Best And Worst Of America

Allison Tolman plays Deputy Sheriff Molly Solverson in the FX TV series Fargo. It's a breakout role for the actress who had done only theater and commercials.
Chris Large

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 8:46 am

The season finale of the FX TV series Fargo airs Tuesday. The series is an "original adaptation" of Joel and Ethan Coen's 1996 film, a dark comedy set in the wintry landscape of rural Minnesota. Nearly 20 years ago, the film won Oscars for best screenplay and best actress.

The 10-episode TV series has a different story and characters, but critics agree that it captured the look and tone of the film, mixing eccentric characters and deadpan humor with sudden and savage violence.

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Pop Culture
1:43 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

A-List Celebrities Flock To Late-Night 'Graham Norton Show'

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 9:39 am

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. Now that the late-night talk show wars have settled down again, our TV critic David Bianculli says there's a talk show we should be watching that's not broadcast by CBS, NBC or ABC or even Comedy Central. It's "The Graham Norton Show," imported by BBC America and shown on Saturday nights. Here's David's review.

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Monkey See
11:06 am
Mon June 16, 2014

For Casey Kasem, A Long-Distance Dedication

Seen here in 2003, Casey Kasem spent much of a long career making music listening less lonely.
Eric Jamison AP

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 12:53 pm

The fact that Casey Kasem, the 82-year-old co-creator and host of the American Top 40 Countdown, reportedly died peacefully while surrounded by his three children, despite a previous tug-of-war between his children and second wife, seems not only fortunate but apt. It means his death can honor his career's great achievement.

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Music
10:29 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Bon Iver's 'Holocene': A Perfect Song To Write To

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we're going to hear from Andy Marra - a transgender activist who writes about different kind of freedom - freedom from wondering about her roots and fear of not being accepted. She spoke to us about finding her birth mother in Korea after coming out as transgender. For a regular segment we call In Your Ear, she shared some of the songs that helped her write that story.

ANDY MARRA: My name is Andy Marra and I am listening to "Lullabies" by Yuna.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LULLABIES")

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Around the Nation
10:29 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Activist Janet Mock: Please Respect Transgender Teens

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Monkey See
6:58 am
Mon June 16, 2014

The Spoiler-Free 'Game Of Thrones' Twitter Translator

Emilia Clarke as this beautiful blonde lady who may or may not one day be murdered on HBO's Game of Thrones. If she is, Twitter will tell you.
Helen Sloan HBO

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 8:55 am

Despite watching a great deal of television — highbrow, lowbrow, middlebrow — I don't watch Game of Thrones. I have never been a fantasy fan, I can't tolerate extensive world-building without nodding off, I don't gravitate toward stories about epic wars, and I'm not particularly drawn by either nudity or innard-splattering. I watched more than half of the first season, I think, but I eventually reached a point in which my brain emphatically said, "This is not going to get better for us."

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The Two-Way
5:42 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Book News: Labor Department Investigating Deaths At Amazon Warehouses

Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 6:35 pm

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Food
8:15 am
Sun June 15, 2014

The Milkman's Comeback Means Dairy At The Door And More

Driver Rick Galloway of South Mountain Creamery delivers milk in Liberty Town, Md., in 2004. Today the company has 8,500 home delivery accounts in five states.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 8:50 am

You don't even have to get out of your PJs to go to the farmers market now.

All over the country, trucks are now delivering fresh milk, organic vegetables and humanely raised chickens to your door — though in New York, the deliveries come by bike.

Fifty years ago, about 30 percent of milk still came from the milkman. By 2005, the last year for which USDA has numbers, only 0.4 percent was home delivered.

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Author Interviews
5:26 am
Sun June 15, 2014

A Media Critique In 'The Last Magazine'

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 9:38 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, BYLINE: And back when the U.S. was preparing to invade Iraq in 2003, a young reporter was getting his start in the world of magazines. Michael Hastings went on to report from the war in Iraq and became best known for a 2010 Rolling Stone profile of Gen. Stanley McChrystal, who was then head of U.S. forces in Afghanistan. The article ultimately ended Gen. McChrystal's military career.

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Author Interviews
5:26 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Painful Path To Fatherhood Inspires Poet's New Collection

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 11:00 am

Douglas Kearney's new book of poetry, Patter, is not something you pick up casually. It demands a lot from its audience — one reviewer wrote that the book's readers must be "agile, adaptive, vigilant and tough."

But the payoff is worth it. Kearney takes his readers into an extremely private struggle, shared with his wife: their attempt to conceive a child. The poems trace a journey through infertility, miscarriage, in vitro fertilization and, finally, fatherhood.

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Food
5:26 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Ballpark Food: As American As Hotdogs With Bacon And Pesto

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 9:51 am

It's not just peanuts and Cracker Jacks anymore. As we head into summer, Dan Pashman of the Sporkful podcast tells NPR's Rachel Martin how to size up ballpark dining options from sushi to gelato.

Three Books...
2:36 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Stitch This: Three Not-At-All Cozy Books About Quilting

When you mention quilts to non-quilters, many think of chintz and florals, pastel ducks and alphabet blocks. It's true that many quilts are like that, in novels as well as in junk shops and craft shows.

However, some novels use quilts in a much darker, more robust way, the writers mercifully avoiding the temptation to blithely suggest that "life is a patchwork quilt."

So forget the chintz. Here are three books where quilts and quilters kick butt.

Tracy Chevalier's most recent novel is The Last Runaway.

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Author Interviews
3:07 pm
Sat June 14, 2014

'Brutal Youth': Three High Schoolers Fight To Survive Bullying

Anthony Breznican is a reporter for Entertainment Weekly. Brutal Youth is his first novel.
Anthony Breznican

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 10:20 am

Anthony Breznican reports on Hollywood for Entertainment Weekly. Turns out he's got a story to tell, too.

His debut novel, Brutal Youth, was just released and he's even got a Hollywood pitch for it. "It's kinda like Fight Club meets The Breakfast Club," Breznican tells NPR's Arun Rath.

It's about bullying at a Catholic high school called St. Michael the Archangel. Students have to choose to go along, to stand their ground, and in some cases, to lash out in order to survive.

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The Salt
12:17 pm
Sat June 14, 2014

Holographic Chocolates Look As Beautiful As They Taste

A company called Morphotonix has given traditional Swiss chocolate-making a colorful twist: It's devised a method to imprint shiny holograms onto the sweet surfaces.
Courtesy of Morphotonix

For most of us, even one bite of chocolate is enough to send our taste buds into ecstasy. Now, scientists have concocted a process to make these dark, dulcet morsels look as decadent as they taste.

Switzerland-based company Morphotonix has given traditional Swiss chocolate-making a colorful twist: It's devised a method to imprint shiny holograms onto the sweet surfaces — sans harmful additives. Which means when you tilt the goodies from side to side, rainbow stars and swirly patterns on the chocolate's surface dance and shimmer in the light.

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