Arts

The Salt
1:47 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Newspaper Takes The Pulse Of San Diego Coffee Culture

John Rippo in July 2012 in a coffeehouse called Espresso Mio, in San Diego's Mission Hills neighborhood.
Courtesy of Josh Bletchely

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 1:51 pm

Portland and Seattle may take coffee very seriously, but San Diego can boast a newspaper devoted entirely to coffee shops and all the news that's fit to print about them. John Rippo is the publisher of The Espresso, and he's convinced that coffee shops are the places to catch juicy moments of the human experience as they happen.

Inspired by European periodicals written for the cafe intelligentsia, Rippo curates local news in his monthly paper to inspire his fellow San Diego residents to social or political action.

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Author Interviews
1:46 am
Tue April 23, 2013

For TV Networks, Stiff Competition To Be 'Top Of The Morning'

Grafissimo iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 1:05 pm

Last spring, what NBC fondly refers to as "America's First Family" went through a very public divorce. Ann Curry, who spent more than a decade as a news anchor on the Today show and less than a year as a host, was unexpectedly axed. "For all of you who saw me as a groundbreaker," Curry said with emotion in her last morning broadcast, "I'm sorry I couldn't carry the ball over the finish line. But man, I did try."

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Code Switch
3:51 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

What Does Modern Prejudice Look Like?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:08 am

Harvard psychologist Mahzarin Banaji was once approached by a reporter for an interview. When Banaji heard the name of the magazine the reporter was writing for, she declined the interview: She didn't think much of the magazine and believed it portrayed research in psychology inaccurately.

But then the reporter said something that made her reconsider, Banaji recalled: "She said, 'You know, I used to be a student at Yale when you were there, and even though I didn't take a course with you, I do remember hearing about your work.' "

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All Tech Considered
3:40 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Google Execs Talk Privacy, Security In 'The New Digital Age'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 10:35 am

Imagine a world with machines that wash, press and dress you on the way to work and vacations via hologram visits to exotic beaches. In his new book, The New Digital Age, Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt does just that — but it's no gee-whiz Jetsons fantasy.

Schmidt partners up with Jared Cohen, a foreign policy counterterrorist specialist poached from the State Department now working for Google Ideas. Together they forecast a raft of new innovations and corresponding threats that will arise for dictatorships, techno revolutionaries, terrorists and you.

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Movie Interviews
2:29 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Redford: An Entertainer Who Looks To Inform

Robert Redford directs and stars as Jim Grant in The Company You Keep, a film about retired radicals living out nervous lives in hiding.
Doane Gregory Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 7:52 pm

Robert Redford's new movie, The Company You Keep, draws on a turbulent time in recent history: Forty years ago, there was a violent faction of SDS, the Students for a Democratic Society, that was known as the Weather Underground. It turned from organizing marches and sit-ins against the war in Vietnam to planting bombs — and in one case robbing a bank truck and killing a guard.

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Author Interviews
12:04 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

'Zoobiquity': What Humans Can Learn From Animal Illness

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 9:05 am

Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, a cardiologist at the UCLA Medical Center, coined the term "zoobiquity" to describe the idea of looking to animals and the doctors who care for them to better understand human health. Veterinary medicine had not been on her radar at all until about 10 years ago. That's when she was asked to join the medical advisory board for the Los Angeles Zoo and she began hearing about "congestive heart failure in a gorilla or leukemia in a rhinoceros or breast cancer in a tiger or a lion."

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Monkey See
11:25 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Agony, Ecstasy, Irony: The Fight For The Soul Of College A Cappella

The Nor'easters, of Northeastern University, perform at the International Competition of Collegiate A Cappella on Saturday night.
Joe Martinez

Saturday night at Town Hall in New York, the Nor'easters of Northeastern University in Boston were crowned national champions at the International Competition of Collegiate A Cappella (ICCA), the entirely real battle dramatized in last summer's surprise hit Pitch Perfect.

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Latin America
11:03 am
Mon April 22, 2013

In Gritty Sao Paulo, Artists Take To The Streets

A portrait is projected on the walls of a building as part of a project promoting art through re-evaluating urban spaces and buildings in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on Nov. 22.
Yasuyoshi Chiba AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 7:52 pm

It's lunchtime in the heart of Sao Paulo's financial district. Surrounded by tall buildings of cool glass and steel, men and women in suits and business attire walk back and forth busily in Brazil's largest city.

Standing amid the bustle is Leticia Matos — who is, for want of a better word, a crochet artist. She couldn't look more different from the people around her.

Wearing a short-sleeve shirt and covered in bright, quirky tattoos, Matos is at work, too. About a year ago, she says, she got the idea for her project while knitting and crocheting with her friends.

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Television
11:02 am
Mon April 22, 2013

'Rectify': An Ex-Con Navigates The World Outside

Daniel (Aden Young) finds a supporter in the devout Tawney (Adelaide Clemens) — if not among all of his other neighbors — when he's exonerated after spending more than 19 years in prison for a crime he did't commit.
Sundance Film Channel

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 9:05 am

Rectify, a new drama series from the Sundance Channel, wants to stand out from the pack — and it certainly succeeds at that. It's a six-hour limited series, more along the British model of TV than ours here in the States. If these first six installments catch on enough, the story will continue. If not, that's it.

And Rectify is so unusual a show, with its own deliberate pace and premise and approach, that it may not build enough viewership to keep going. But that doesn't mean it's not a worthwhile show, or a memorable one — because it is.

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Movie Reviews
10:03 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Tom Cruise's Latest Headed For 'Oblivion'

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 9:05 am

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

In December, Tom Cruise starred as the title character in the film "Jack Reacher." In "Oblivion," which opened on Friday, he plays another Jack, one of few humans left on an Earth devastated by an alien invasion. "Oblivion" is based on a graphic novel co-written by Joseph Kosinski, who went on to direct the film, and it costars Morgan Freeman and Melissa Leo. Film critic David Edelstein has this review.

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Author Interviews
10:01 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Teaching Shakespeare In A Maximum Security Prison

Many people thought Laura Bates was out of her mind when she offered to teach Shakespeare in the maximum security wing of an Indiana prison. But the prisoners found a deep connection with the playwright's words. Laura Bates talks about her experience in her new book Shakespeare Saved My Life: Ten Years in Solitary with the Bard. She speaks with host Michel Martin.

Arts & Life
9:30 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Professor Offers Ode to Boston

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 10:01 am

Tell Me More is celebrating National Poetry Month with the series 'Muses and Metaphor.' Listeners are sending their own poems via Twitter. Today's poetic tweet comes from Luisa Igloria. She teaches creative writing at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Va.

The Two-Way
5:17 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Book News: E.L. Konigsburg, 'Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler' Author, Dies

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 10:04 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Mon April 22, 2013

A British Intellectual's Mission 'To Create The Perfect Wife'

cover detail

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 6:01 pm

At least since Pygmalion prayed for his beautiful ivory statue to become a real woman, men have struggled to find a mate who is almost literally made for them. Today you can turn to any number of algorithm-based websites to find your romantic ideal; you can even special-order brides from faraway lands. But in Georgian England, one well-heeled young man sought out his perfect love in a rather shocking and unlikely place: an orphanage.

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Author Interviews
4:23 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

'Humanity' May Get Second Chance In Jean Thompson's New Novel

chuwy iStockphoto.com

In Jean Thompson's latest novel, The Humanity Project, humanity isn't doing so well and could use some help. Sean is a wayward carpenter whose bad luck with women turns into even worse luck: He's addicted to painkillers, and he and his teenage son Conner are facing eviction. Linnea is the teen survivor of a school shooting who travels west to California to live with a father she barely knows. Mrs. Foster is a wealthy woman who's taken to living with feral cats, and whose "Humanity Project" just might take a chance on people who thought they were out of luck.

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The Salt
11:19 am
Sun April 21, 2013

Spirituality And Sprite, Aisle 1? What An Artist Sees In Wal-Mart

O'Connell also crowdsources the photographs he uses as fodder for his paintings. This piece, which shows men buying candies and Valentine's Day cards for their sweethearts, was based on a submission.
Courtesy of Brendan O'Connell

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 10:43 am

Most people would be hard-pressed to call Wal-Mart a source of artistic inspiration. A place to purchase peanut butter, cereal and other mundane necessities? Yes. But a rendezvous spot with transcendence? Hardly.

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Theater
4:45 am
Sun April 21, 2013

L.A. On B'way: Midler, Mengers Take Manhattan

Bette Midler in I'll Eat You Last: A Chat With Sue Mengers. Midler stars as Mengers, a legendary and larger-than-life Hollywood agent whose sharp wit won her both friends and foes in the film industry.
Richard Termine/BBBway

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 2:56 pm

After more than 40 years away, Bette Midler is returning to Broadway. She's playing legendary Hollywood agent Sue Mengers in a riotous solo show titled I'll Eat You Last.

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Author Interviews
4:45 am
Sun April 21, 2013

Fire, Water, Air, Earth: Michael Pollan Gets Elemental In 'Cooked'

Penguin Press

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 2:56 pm

In his systematic scrutiny of the modern American food chain, Michael Pollan has explored everything from the evolution of edible plants to the industrial agricultural complex. In his newest book, he charts territory closer to home — or rather, at home, in his kitchen.

Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation surveys how the four classical elements — fire, water, air and earth — transform plants and animals into food. Pollan joins NPR's Rachel Martin to discuss the merits of slow home cooking and his adventures in fermentation.

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Sunday Puzzle
4:45 am
Sun April 21, 2013

You'll Get It Just Right, Junior

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 2:56 pm

On-air challenge: Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name with the initials "J.R."

Last week's challenge from listener Sandy Weisz: Take a common English word. Write it in capital letters. Move the first letter to the end and rotate it 90 degrees. You'll get a new word that is pronounced exactly the same as the first word. What words are these?

Answer: Won, one; wry, rye

Winner: Ben Austin of Dobbs Ferry, N.Y.

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Author Interviews
4:45 am
Sun April 21, 2013

For A Student Of Theology, Poetry Reverberates

Nate Klug is a poet, translator and candidate for ordained ministry in the United Church of Christ. He lives in New Haven, Conn., where he studies at Yale Divinity School.
Frank Brown Courtesy Nate Klug

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 2:56 pm

April is National Poetry Month, and NPR is celebrating by asking young poets what poetry means to them. This week, Weekend Edition speaks with Nate Klug, whose poems have appeared in Poetry, Threepenny Review and other journals. Klug is also a master of divinity candidate at the Yale Divinity School and a candidate for ordination in the United Church of Christ. "It's nice to go home from a day of thinking about the church to this whole other world of poetry," he says. "But obviously there are some really amazing ways that they intersect."

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Art & Design
4:45 am
Sun April 21, 2013

When Sculpting Cedar, This Artist Is Tireless And Unsentimental

Michael Bodycomb Ursula von Rydingsvard/Galerie Lelong

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 8:42 pm

Ursula von Rydingsvard makes huge sculptures out of red cedar. The 70-year-old is one of the few women working in wood on such a scale.

Her pieces are in the permanent collections of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art and Museum of Modern Art. And now they're also part of a new show at Manhattan's Museum of Arts and Design. It's called "Against the Grain" — a phrase that could just as well describe the sculptor's life and career.

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Three Books...
4:03 am
Sun April 21, 2013

On The Move: Three Books To Keep Out Of The Boxes

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 8:10 am

These days, nothing says amateur hour quite like an alphabetical bookshelf. From lifestyle magazines to design blogs (admittedly a short distance), there are limitless suggestions for how you should treat your books. You can arrange them by genre, by time period, by size or by color (all well and good until you realize how strangely few books have purple spines). You can stack them in height order. You can angle them across the wall in gentle waves of Swedish manufacture. My own system of classification is one of emotional practicality.

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Author Interviews
4:50 pm
Sat April 20, 2013

Kay Bailey Hutchison On Other 'Unflinching' Texan Women

George Ranch Historical Park

Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison knows what it means to be a pioneering female figure in her home state. In 1993, she became the first woman elected to represent Texas in the U.S. Senate.

Now, the former senator has written a book about the women who came before her, Unflinching Courage: Pioneering Women Who Shaped Texas.

In the book, Hutchison profiles several women who broke barriers and made history in the Lone Star State. Many of those women left a life of luxury and "moved to nothing," she tells All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:41 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Secretary Of Education Arne Duncan Plays Not My Job

Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

This segment was originally broadcast on March 8, 2013.

Arne Duncan is President Obama's secretary of education, and if, while he's on this show, a disaster befalls the president, the vice president, the speaker of the House and every other member of the Cabinet except Veterans Affairs and Homeland Security, he would be president.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:41 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Actor Jeff Bridges Plays Not My Job

Frazer Harrison Getty Images

This segment was originally broadcast on Jan. 11, 2013.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:41 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Melinda Gates Plays Not My Job

Courtesy Melinda Gates

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 10:56 pm

Back in the early 1990s, Melinda French was a rising star at a software company when the boss asked her out on a date. This was complicated because he was her boss, and frankly, he was kind of a nerd. But they fell in love and got married, and decided to raise a family, retire from the business, and in their spare time give away more money to charity than anyone else in the history of the world.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:41 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Singer Erykah Badu Plays Not My Job

Karl Walter Getty Images

This segment was originally broadcast on Feb. 08, 2013.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:41 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Al Gore Plays Not My Job: Extended Cut

Axel Schmidt AFP/Getty Images

A shorter version of this segment was originally broadcast on Feb. 14, 2013.

Since Al Gore's term as the 45th vice president of the United States ended in 2001, he has starred in an Oscar-winning documentary, won a Grammy Award and received the Nobel Peace Prize. But obviously he won't be satisfied until he wins the NPR news quiz, so we've invited him to play a game called "Maybe you can beat Bill Clinton at this."

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Arts & Life
5:41 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Emily Moore On How She Became A Poet

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 11:57 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

April is National Poetry Month and to celebrate, WEEKEND EDITION is talking with younger poets about their experience with poetry and why they still feel it's important in our everyday lives.

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Books
3:20 am
Sat April 20, 2013

So Hot Right Now: Has Climate Change Created A New Literary Genre?

Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 11:57 am

When Superstorm Sandy hit New York City last fall, the publisher Farrar, Straus and Giroux, like most everything else, totally shut down. It was a week before power returned to FSG, according to Brian Gittis, a senior publicist. When he got back to his office, he began sorting through galleys — advance copies of books. And one of them caught him off guard.

Its cover had an illustration of the Manhattan skyline half-submerged in water.

"It was definitely sort of a Twilight Zone moment," Gittis recalls.

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