Arts

Theater
9:50 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Behind The Curtain Of 'Disgraced'

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, the story of one of the world's biggest and most destructive industries, tourism. Author Elizabeth Becker talks about the explosion in travel since the Cold War.

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Arts & Life
9:50 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Listeners Muse About Flowers And Tacos

Tell Me More is celebrating National Poetry Month by hearing poetic tweets from listeners for the 'Muses and Metaphor' series. Today's poems cover Texas, Tennessee and tacos.

Monkey See
6:31 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Everywhere But Here, 'Iron Man 3' Is Already Huge

Iron Man 3 doesn't open in North America until this Friday (May 3), but this weekend, it's already up and whomping The Avengers at the international box office. The new adventures of Tony Stark, directed and co-written by Lethal Weapon screenwriter Shane Black, brought in $195.3 million. That beat a mere $185.1 million when The Avengers opened internationally to make it the biggest opening weekend ever in a bunch of countries, including Argentina and Indonesia.

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The Two-Way
5:27 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Book News: Feminist Icon Mary Thom Dies In Motorcycle Crash

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Poetry
5:03 am
Mon April 29, 2013

From Dissections To Depositions, Poets' Second Jobs

last year, works as a lawyer. She says that poetry appears in law more often than you might think — but nobody calls it poetry." href="/post/dissections-depositions-poets-second-jobs" class="noexit lightbox">
Monica Youn, who joined NPR as a NewsPoet last year, works as a lawyer. She says that poetry appears in law more often than you might think — but nobody calls it poetry.
Doriane Raiman NPR

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 12:00 pm

"No man but a blockhead," Samuel Johnson famously observed, "ever wrote, except for money." This is tough news for poets, since the writing they do is often less immediately profitable than a second-grader's math homework (the kid gets a cookie or a hug; the poet gets a rejection letter from The Kenyon Review). Poetry itself is tremendously valuable, of course, but that value is often realized many years after a poem's composition, and sometimes long after the end of its author's life.

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New In Paperback
5:03 am
Mon April 29, 2013

April 22-May 5: Julia Child, Jonathan Franzen And Herta Muller

* Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Author Interviews
1:28 am
Mon April 29, 2013

A Grieving Brother Finds Solace In His Sister's 'Small Town'

Brother and sister Rod Dreher and Ruthie Leming grew up in a small town in rural Louisiana. Dreher left the tightknit community to pursue a journalism career but returned home after Leming died of lung cancer in 2010.
Courtesy Rod Dreher

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 10:21 am

When he was a teenager, journalist Rod Dreher couldn't wait to escape Louisiana. Now he has found his way home again in grief — after his sister's death from lung cancer. It was "in light" of that tragedy, Dreher says, that he discovered the value of community. It's the subject of his new book, The Little Way of Ruthie Leming: A Southern Girl, a Small Town, and the Secret of a Good Life.

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Architecture
1:24 am
Mon April 29, 2013

How One Family Built America's Public Palaces

The elaborately tiled City Hall subway station in New York City — still extant but now closed to the public, alas — used the Guastavino touch to convince wary city dwellers to head underground for a train trip.
Michael Freeman National Buildling Museum

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 9:52 am

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Author Interviews
2:56 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Iran's Political Scene Is Sketchy For Cartoonists

"War" by Touka Neyestani: Neyestani received a degree in architecture from Tehran's Science and Industry University, and has been a cartoonist for more than 30 years.
International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 10:32 am

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Three Books...
5:03 am
Sun April 28, 2013

What's Cooking? 3 Books That Are More Filling Than Food

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 1:41 pm

Foodie fiction has become a veritable genre, devoted to deliciousness, to making your mouth water, to making you feel suddenly, irrevocably starved — and to making everything, sprouts and bologna included, an aphrodisiac. But what happens when enough is enough? Or when, perhaps, you're on a diet, or a deserted island, or attempting celibacy, or learning to live without gluten? What happens when you're hungry for the kind of fiction that concerns food but isn't in love with food — and thereby won't make you hungry, or lustful, or both?

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Poetry
4:41 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Dilruba Ahmed: An Outsider Turns To Poetry

promo image

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:40 pm

April is National Poetry Month, and to celebrate, Weekend Edition is talking with younger poets about why they chose to write poetry and why it's still important in our everyday lives. This week, we spoke to Bangladeshi-American poet Dilruba Ahmed.

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Sunday Puzzle
3:01 am
Sun April 28, 2013

As You Know, Puzzles Are A Pastime

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:40 pm

On-air challenge: For each given category, name something in the category where the first letter is also the first letter of the category. For example, given "Military Ranks," you would say "Major."

Last week's challenge: Name a geographical location in two words — nine letters altogether — that, when spoken aloud, sounds roughly like four letters of the alphabet. What is it?

Answer: Aegean Sea; Indian Cay

Winner: Terry Thacker, Greenville, S.C.

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Code Switch
4:57 pm
Sat April 27, 2013

'I'm The Café And He's The Leche'

Café de Leche owner Anya Schodorf grew up in Managua, Nicaragua, and came to the U.S. when she was 14.
Shereen Marisol Meraji NPR

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 7:06 pm

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Author Interviews
3:39 pm
Sat April 27, 2013

Hard Hits, Hard Liquor In 'The Summer of Beer and Whiskey'

PublicAffairs

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 4:13 pm

The summer of 1883 proved to be a pivotal time for American baseball.

A brash German immigrant and beer garden owner, Chris Von der Ahe strode onto the scene to found a new franchise, the St. Louis Browns — a team that would later become the St. Louis Cardinals.

His motivation? To sell more beer. And while he made a fortune, he also changed the sport forever.

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Television
2:57 pm
Sat April 27, 2013

Two Daytime Soaps Return, But Will Fans Follow Online?

New episodes of All My Children will be airing on Hulu starting Monday.
Hulu

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 1:15 pm

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Just In Time For Poetry Month, Four Fantastic Books Of Verse

Andreas Rentz Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 7:52 am

April is National Poetry Month, and what better way to celebrate than with new poetry releases? Here are four of this month's highlights — a new translation, a "best of" collection, a "collected works" worth revisiting and a camera-eye view of the world.

The Divine Comedy

The season premiere of Mad Men opened with John Ciardi's 1954 translation of Dante's Inferno:

Midway in our life's journey, I went astray
from the straight road and woke to find myself
alone in a dark wood.

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Theater
4:48 am
Sat April 27, 2013

When Tonys Tap Faves, Look For These Names

Tom Hanks is one to watch at Tuesday's Tony nominations; he's making his Broadway debut in Norah Ephron's final play, Lucky Guy.
Joan Marcus

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 4:42 pm

Nominations for the Tony Awards, Broadway's annual honors, will be announced April 30. Among the shows eligible: loud London transplants like Matilda the Musical, a new play by David Mamet, a revival of David Mamet, two revivals of Clifford Odets and a revival of the '70s musical Pippin.

Lots of Hollywood stars have made the trek to Broadway this season, ranging from Scarlett Johansson in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof to Tom Hanks in Norah Ephron's last play, Lucky Guy.

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Author Interviews
4:48 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Siblings, Seafarers And 'Secrets' In Moviemaker's Novel

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 1:57 pm

Brendan, Cordelia and Eleanor Walker were suspicious from the first. They may be young — Cordelia is 15, Brendan is 12 and Eleanor is 8 — but they have enough worldly experience to know that when a real estate agent says a place is charming and rustic, she means that it's small and has wild bears in the backyard. So when the siblings first hear about the house at 28 Sea Cliff Avenue in San Francisco, they're skeptical. And their caution is quite warranted; the Kristoff House, as it's called, turns out to hold secrets, magic, skeleton pirates and a behemoth who looks like Mick Jagger.

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Author Interviews
4:48 am
Sat April 27, 2013

'Country Girl' Edna O'Brien On A Lifetime Of Lit, Loneliness And Love

Little, Brown and Co.

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 1:57 pm

When Edna O'Brien wrote The Country Girls in 1960, the book was acclaimed by critics, banned by the Irish Censorship Board and burned in churches for suggesting that the two small-town girls at the center of the book had romantic lives. Oh, why be obscure? Sex lives.

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Arts & Life
4:48 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Poet Kazim Ali On Poetry In Everyday Life

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 1:57 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

April is National Poetry Month. And throughout the month, WEEKEND EDITION is speaking with younger poets about the importance of poetry in daily life. This morning, we hear from translator and poet Kazim Ali.

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Author Interviews
3:04 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Through Art And Industry, Chicago Shaped America

The term "third coast" refers to American cities that sit on the Great Lakes shoreline, like Chicago.
Jeff Haynes AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 8:16 am

After World War II, America became a superpower. New York experienced a global rise; Los Angeles was sprawling. But in a new book, Thomas Dyja writes that "the most profound aspects of American Modernity grew up out of the flat, prairie land next to Lake Michigan" — Chicago.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
4:26 pm
Fri April 26, 2013

Not My Job: Kal Penn Takes A Quiz On The Microbiome

Discovery Channel

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 10:22 am

Kal Penn has a pretty unusual resume: He has starred in Harold and Kumar, the most successful series of stoner movies made in the past decade; and has served in the White House as the Obama administration's liaison to youth. Now he's hosting a new show, The Big Brain Theory, on the Discovery Channel.

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Song Travels
1:58 pm
Fri April 26, 2013

David Hyde Pierce On 'Song Travels'

"Any show that's any good is much better a month later," Davie Hyde Pierce says of Broadway critics who only show up the first night. "And if it's been done right, it's way better a year later, but such is life."
Courtesy of the artist

Actor, singer and comedian David Hyde Pierce is best known for his Emmy-winning role as Niles Crane on the long-running TV series Frasier. He's also a Tony-winning actor for his role in Curtains. As a child, Pierce began in classical music as a pianist, but one summer, that all changed.

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Monkey See
1:33 pm
Fri April 26, 2013

Tribeca Diary: Documentary Roundup

A group of young women pose for a picture in a still from the documentary Teenage, a film that explores the evolution of young adulthood in America and abroad.
Tribeca Film Festival

Writer Joel Arnold is surveying the scene at the Tribeca Film Festival, which runs in New York City through April 28. He'll be filing occasional dispatches for Monkey See.

I keep going back to the documentaries. Out of the 14 films I've seen here so far, the documentaries have consistently offered some of the most inherently dynamic subjects — and served up surprising moments of discovery.

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Monkey See
11:28 am
Fri April 26, 2013

Tribeca Diary: 'A Birder's Guide To Everything'

A ragtag group of amateur birders pursue a rare North American duck in A Birder's Guide to Everything. Pictured (from left): Katie Chang, Alex Wolff, Kodi Smit-McPhee and Michael Chen.
Tribeca Film Festival

Writer Joel Arnold is surveying the scene at the Tribeca Film Festival, which runs in New York City through April 28. He'll be filing occasional dispatches for Monkey See.

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Movie Interviews
9:52 am
Fri April 26, 2013

'Guilt Trip': Streisand On Songs, Film And Family

Barbra Streisand is Joyce Brewster in The Guilt Trip. The multitalented performer has won an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy and a Tony — a feat achieved by fewer than a dozen artists.
Sam Emerson Paramount Pictures

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 6:04 am

This interview was originally broadcast on Dec. 17, 2012.

If a good voice is genetic, it's likely Barbra Streisand got hers from her mother. Streisand's mother was too shy to ever perform professionally, but she had a lyric soprano and would sing at bar mitzvahs in their Brooklyn neighborhood when Streisand was a girl.

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Arts & Life
9:49 am
Fri April 26, 2013

Listeners Tweet Flowers And Fruitfulness

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 10:23 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

And next, the latest in our series, Muses and Metaphor. We're celebrating National Poetry Month by hearing your tweet poems. Today's first poem is from artist and writer Susan Crane of Longmont, Colorado. Here she is.

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Monkey See
6:27 am
Fri April 26, 2013

How 'The Office' Took A Scene From The Heart And Shot It In The Foot

John Krasinski and Jenna Fischer as Jim and Pam Halpert.
Chris Haston NBC

This has been a difficult year for The Office. There are only three episodes left after "Paper Airplanes," which aired Thursday night, and where 30 Rock rallied as it headed to the finish, The Office has seemed lost, particularly by devoting substantial time to world-building Dwight's beet farm, a remnant of a failed spin-off effort.

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The Salt
12:48 am
Fri April 26, 2013

So Jerry Seinfeld Called Us To Talk About Coffee

In an episode of Comedians In Cars Getting Coffee called "Larry Eats A Pancake," Jerry Seinfeld has coffee with Larry David.
YouTube

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 1:48 pm

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Theater
2:59 pm
Thu April 25, 2013

On Broadway, One Runt To Rule Them All

The Broadway musical Matilda put NPR's Bob Mondello in mind of two other big-budget tuners with plucky kids at the center of the action — and got him thinking about what these shows say about their eras.
Joan Marcus

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 6:16 pm

Broadway's newest family-friendly musical, Matilda, based on the Roald Dahl novel about a precocious child who proves smarter than all the adults in her life, opened earlier this month to some of the best reviews of the year.

While it's a brand-new show, seeing it jogged my memory — jogged it all the way back to my very first commentary for All Things Considered exactly 29 years ago.

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