Arts

Shots - Health News
6:25 am
Sat March 14, 2015

From Freud To Possession, A Doctor Faces Psychiatry's Demons

Benjamin Rush, a physician and one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, invented the rotational chair as a treatment for psychotic patients. He believed the chair helped improve circulation to the mentally ill brain.
U.S. National Library of Medicine Courtesy of Little Brown and Company

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 7:58 am

People don't talk about psychiatrists the way they talk about neurologists, dentists or vets. In fact, there are those who call psychiatry voodoo or pseudoscience; and, to be fair, the specialty does have a history of claims and practices that are now considered weird and destructive.

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The Seams
6:25 am
Sat March 14, 2015

How The Luxury Fashion Industry Became All Business

Models walk the catwalk in March 2009 during one of Alexander McQueen's last shows, Ready-to-Wear Autumn/Winter 2009, in Paris. McQueen was one of several fashion designers elevated to prominence by Bernard Arnault, the French tycoon who transformed the business of high fashion.
Pascal Le Segretain Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 4:31 am

Fashion Week looks glamorous, but as it drew to a close in Paris last Wednesday — following shows in New York, London and Milan — it became clear that the runway has become a racetrack.

The pace of the multibillion-dollar fashion industry has changed in recent years from luxurious to laborious. Even the seasons have accelerated.

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Books
6:25 am
Sat March 14, 2015

Murder City Earns Its Name In 'Blood Runs Green'

Originally published on Sat March 14, 2015 3:20 pm

Chicago's reputation for dramatic crime and corruption predates Al Capone and Prohibition — by decades. In May, 1889, Dr. P.H. Cronin, an esteemed physician, was found in a sewer. He was naked, dead, and savagely beaten.

The investigation and trial caused an international sensation, and one of the world's first media circuses, over a story that involved Irish revolutionaries and reactionaries, secret societies, and even a French spy. Or was he British? All at a time when Chicago had been burned down, and was reborn as the fast-growing city in America.

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Code Switch
6:25 am
Sat March 14, 2015

These Nightclub Entertainers Paved The Way For Asian-Americans In Showbiz

Mai Tai Sing dances with her husband, Wilbur Tai Sing, in 1942.
Courtesy DeepFocus Productions Inc.

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 12:27 pm

As a kid growing up in San Francisco, filmmaker Arthur Dong often walked by a nightclub just outside of Chinatown. "I remember distinctly looking at the marquee and looking at the glass display case [with] all these wonderful black and white photos of Chinese people, but dressed in zoot suits and 1940s kind of gowns and tuxedos," he says. "And I had never seen Chinese dressed like that."

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The Salt
6:25 am
Sat March 14, 2015

The Family Peach Farm That Became A Symbol Of The Food Revolution

Mas Masumoto grew up on his family farm southeast of Fresno, Calif. His 1987 essay "Epitaph for A Peach," in which he bemoaned the loss of heirloom flavors, captured his changing philosophy as a farmer. It also helped turn his farm into a landmark in the local-food movement.
Dan Charles/NPR

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 11:50 am

In the heart of California's Central Valley, a vast expanse of orchards, vineyards, and vegetable fields, lies a small collection of aging peach trees. Farmer Mas Masumoto's decision to preserve those trees, and then to write about it, became a symbol of resistance to machine-driven food production.

Yet the Masumoto farm's story isn't just one of saving peaches. It's become a father-daughter saga of claiming, abandoning, and then re-claiming a piece of America's agricultural heritage.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Sat March 14, 2015

'Persona' Is A Dangerous Dance Of Diplomacy And Celebrity

Courtesy of Simon & Schuster

I have been reading Genevieve Valentine's writing for a long time, and as much as her fiction delights me, I confess that the work of hers that brings me the most pleasure is her series of Red Carpet Rundowns.

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The Two-Way
3:45 pm
Fri March 13, 2015

Univision Incident Reignites Questions About Diversity In Latino Media

Former Univision host Rodner Figueroa
Alexander Tamargo Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 10:40 am

Univision host Rodner Figueroa has been let go for offensive remarks about first lady Michelle Obama.

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Arts & Life
2:54 pm
Fri March 13, 2015

What's Familiar Becomes Unnerving In 'It Follows'

It Follows "inverts the abstinence metaphor behind most teen horror flicks," says NPR film critic Bob Mondello.
Courtesy of Radius-TWC

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 6:00 pm

David Robert Mitchell's debut feature, The Myth of the American Sleepover, was a gentle, evocative story of teens and summer crushes set in Detroit. Unthreatening, sweet in the way of Freaks and Geeks, and the coming-of-age stories of John Hughes, it embraced the confusion of adolescence with warmth and affection.

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Author Interviews
2:54 pm
Fri March 13, 2015

If Drugs Could Talk: In 'Delicious Foods' They Do

person cover detail

Originally published on Fri April 3, 2015 11:11 am

There's a certain type of supporting character that author James Hannaham has always wanted to put into the spotlight. Critics call this character the "Magical Negro" — and you may recognize him from movies or TV shows. He's someone who "has incredible abilities and has been through some kind of hardship but it's usually a little vague ..." Hannaham tells NPR's Audie Cornish. "Whenever I see that character, I want the book or the movie or the TV show to take a detour and tell me that story."

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Monkey See
1:31 pm
Fri March 13, 2015

In 'I Hate Christian Laettner,' ESPN Explores The Belly Of The Beast

Duke's Christian Laettner stretches during a news conference in Indianapolis in March 1991.
Bob Jordan AP

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Movie Reviews
11:36 am
Fri March 13, 2015

Horror Film Fans Beware: 'It Follows' Isn't The Fun Kind Of Scare

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 11:37 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

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The Salt
9:40 am
Fri March 13, 2015

Making Pies For Pi Day: Think Inside The Circle

Claire O'Neill/NPR

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 4:03 pm

Editor's note: A version of this story was published in March 2011.

Get ready to roll out some dough, because it's almost Pi Day.

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Monkey See
8:20 am
Fri March 13, 2015

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Cultural Anniversaries And Great Things For Kids

NPR

Back in February, when it was terribly icy, we were scheduled to record our Oscars Omnibus live in Studio 1 at NPR HQ. Unfortunately, the weather interfered, and we had to push the show forward. While this meant we didn't have people live in the room to react with glee or horror as Stephen and Glen nearly came to blows over Boyhood, it also meant we got to gather for our rescheduled show with our pal Guy Raz, of the TED Radio Hour, to talk about time.

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The Salt
5:03 am
Fri March 13, 2015

Behold! The Cosmos Created From The Contents Of A Kitchen

Planet: bottom of a glass containing half and half, water, food coloring. Moons: bottom of a glass containing coconut milk, water, food coloring. Stars: salt, cinnamon, baking powder, Tums.
Navid Baraty

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 10:13 am

Surely, you've heard of making food in space. Astronauts have to eat, right?

But perhaps you hadn't considered making space out of food. Navid Baraty, a freelance photographer in Brooklyn and Los Angeles, arranges common pantry items to create strikingly accurate-looking photos of an imaginary cosmos.

"I'm a really big space geek," Baraty tells The Salt. "I'll look at NASA images or Hubble images to see how things were placed in the sky, and I try to make things as realistic as possible."

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Monkey See
5:02 am
Fri March 13, 2015

A Girl, A Shoe, A Prince: The Endlessly Evolving Cinderella

Cinderella and her fairy godmother in the 1950 Disney cartoon.
Courtesy of Disney Princess

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 9:47 pm

"Woman gives birth to a gourd."

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Remembrances
4:14 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Author Terry Pratchett Was No Stranger To Death

Terry Pratchett wrote more than 70 books.
Rob Wilkins Courtesy of Doubleday

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 5:44 pm

Fantasy author Sir Terry Pratchett was prolific: He wrote more than 70 books, dozens of them about the Discworld — a flat planet borne through space by four elephants on the back of a giant turtle. Pratchett died Thursday at age 66. He had been suffering from early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

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The Salt
1:46 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Southerners Are Getting Creative With Their Favorite Nut: Pecan

Toasting or roasting brings nut oils to the surface, and pecans are practically overflowing: 75 percent of the nut is pure oil.
Ashley Fisher/Flickr

Few dishes showcase Southern tradition more perfectly than a slice of pecan pie, with its dark custard filling and crunchy, nutty topping.

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Book Reviews
1:39 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

How We Deal With Loss In Different Ways In Two Beautifully Written Memoirs

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 5:16 pm

Loss is the rough tie that binds two memoirs that, otherwise, are as different as day and night. What Comes Next and How to Like It is a sequel of sorts to Abigail Thomas' best-selling 2006 memoir, A Three Dog Life, which chronicled the one-two punch death of her husband — by her account, a sweetheart of a guy who took their dog out for a walk one afternoon in New York and was hit by a car. He suffered brain injuries and lingered for five years. Even after that catastrophe, more losses now loom for Thomas.

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Author Interviews
1:39 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Inspired By Monks, A Writer Embraces His Life Of Solitude

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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Author Interviews
1:39 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

'Dirty Old London': A History Of The Victorians' Infamous Filth

Horses drive traffic on London's Oxford Street in 1890. According to author Lee Jackson, by the 1890s, the city's horses produced approximately 1,000 tons of dung a day.
London Stereoscopic Company Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 3:20 pm

In the 19th century, London was the capital of the largest empire the world had ever known — and it was infamously filthy. It had choking, sooty fogs; the Thames River was thick with human sewage; and the streets were covered with mud.

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The Two-Way
10:35 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Terry Pratchett, Prolific Fantasy Author, Dies At 66

Terry Pratchett at the 2012 South Bank Sky Arts Awards in London.
Ian Gavan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 5:56 am

Sir Terry Pratchett, the prolific author behind the Discworld series, has died at the age of 66. The British writer had struggled with a rare, early-onset form Alzheimer's disease for the better part of a decade.

His publisher, Transworld Books, confirmed news of the writer's death in a tweet Thursday morning.

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Ask Me Another
8:19 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Homecoming Game

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 8:37 am

In this final round, contestants school each other for the chance to be serenaded by VIP Tituss Burgess.

The chicken is headed for the endzone aaaand...it's good! Touchdown for Perdue! All the answers in this game contain the name of a major U.S. college or university.

Heard in Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

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Ask Me Another
8:19 am
Thu March 12, 2015

What Is Jeopardy?

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 8:37 am

Because you've been programmed to give answers in the form of a question, all the answers in this game are famous phrases that begin with the question "what is."

Heard in Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Ask Me Another
8:19 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Stateside Attractions

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 8:37 am

Everybody knows how to identify state names from the first few letters, but the last ones? What state ends with a "s-i-n"? As added bonus trivia, we'll tell you a too-weird-to-be-true-but-guess-what-it's-real roadside attraction found in each state.

Heard in Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

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Ask Me Another
8:19 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Award-Winning Tonys

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 8:37 am

Apparently, the key to success is being named Tony, because these various Tonys have all won awards. Try to guess which Tony won a Best Supporting Emmy on Veep.

Heard in Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

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Ask Me Another
8:19 am
Thu March 12, 2015

TV Movies

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 8:37 am

TV movies are usually an hour-long special on TV but in this game they are mashed up TV and movie titles which all share one word in common.

Heard in Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Ask Me Another
8:19 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Tituss Burgess: You're Rocking This Thing

"I auditioned for The Lion King 20 times in 15 years, until they finally told me, 'You are not passing as a straight giraffe.'" - Titus Andromedon, the character Tituss Burgess plays in the new show Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt.
Josh Rogosin NPR

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 9:06 am

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Ask Me Another
8:19 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Palindromes Semordnilap

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 8:37 am

A palindrome is a word or phrase that is the same forwards and backwards, but a semordnilap ("palindromes" backwards) is a word that becomes a different word when read backwards. Get it, smug gums?

Heard in Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

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Book Reviews
8:03 am
Thu March 12, 2015

The Ecstatic, Erotic Joy Of Reading 'Girl In The Dark'

Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 3:45 pm

Anna Lyndsey lives in the dark. She was living a pleasantly ordinary life, working for the British government, when she began to feel a sensitivity to light: At first, computer screens seemed to burn her face, and then artificial lights, and then, finally, sunlight.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu March 12, 2015

In Vargas Llosa's Latest, Dickens Meets Soap Opera

Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 10:27 am

The Discreet Hero is set in two Peruvian cities, the provincial desert town of Piura and the metropolis of Lima, and tells of two aging businessmen, each of whom we meet on the verge of life-changing situations.

A transportation company owner from Piura, Felicito Yanaque, has spent most of his adult years in a bloodless marriage. He has two sons, a young mistress, and has recently become the apparent target of an extortion threat against his transit enterprise, a threat that, he vows heroically, to fight against, with or without the help of the police.

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