Arts

Book Reviews
5:03 am
Wed June 25, 2014

Space Chases And Explosions On A Galactic Scale In 'Cibola Burn'

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 9:44 am

Cibola Burn is a big book. Huge, really, both in terms of pages (nearly 600 in the version I got), and in pure authorial chutzpah. It is part four in the Expanse series, which has, thus far, included three books and a smattering of novellas. And it represents, for dedicated readers of James S.A. Corey (in real life, the two-man team of Daniel Abraham and Ty Franck) the biggest, most sprawling leap of an already sprawling tale.

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The Two-Way
5:01 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

'Star Wars' Museum Lands In Chicago

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 6:08 am

Star Wars creator George Lucas has chosen Chicago as the location of a planned museum of his art and movie memorabilia.

A spokesman for Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel says the Lucas Cultural Arts Museum will be built in the Windy City.

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Code Switch
3:25 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

'Freedom Summer' And 'The Watsons': Powerful TV About A Civil Rights Journey

Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party delegates and supporters stage a demonstration on the boardwalk in front of the Atlantic City Convention Center in 1964.
Courtesy of George Ballis/Take Stock

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 2:15 pm

As part of NPR's "Book Your Trip" series, TV critic Eric Deggans looks at a different kind of summertime journey, described in two books that became TV shows: PBS's documentary Freedom Summer, debuting tonight, and The Hallmark Channel's The Watsons Go to Birmingham.

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Book Reviews
2:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Book Review: 'No Country'

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 5:14 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish. Kalyan Ray has been busy. The Bangladesh-born writer is also a translator and actor. That may be why 10 years have passed since his first novel was released. And reviewer Alan Cheuse is happy his second is now out.

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Monkey See
1:48 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

FX's 'Tyrant' Drowns An Opportunity For Nuance In Stereotypes

Jennifer Finnegan is Molly Al-Fayeed and Adam Rayner is Bassam "Barry" Al-Fayeed, the Americanized couple at the heart of FX's Tyrant.
Patrick Harbron FX

With Iraq spiraling out of control in a conflict where everyone involved has a compromised and troubling past, there's no better time for a TV series about the son of a brutal Middle Eastern dictator who returns home from America ready to oppose his father's tactics.

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The Two-Way
5:32 am
Tue June 24, 2014

Book News: James Patterson Wants To Give Books To New York City Kids

James Patterson writes suspense and thriller novels as well as children's books. He runs the children's literacy campaign ReadKiddoRead.
Deborah Feingold Courtesy Little, Brown and Co.

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Tue June 24, 2014

'Hidden Sea': What Happens When Fantasyland Doesn't Want You?

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 12:53 pm

Usually when someone steps from our world into a fantasy world, they're one of two sorts of characters. There's the Bookish Outcast for whom the portal fantasy is a literal manifestation of the act of reading as escape — and there's the Chosen One, an otherwise unremarkable or unlikeable character who has a Destiny waiting in the other world. There are of course dozens of variations on these roles, but often portal fantasies are more or less wish fulfillment: we want to escape, to be wanted, to be important or powerful or our best selves.

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First Reads
4:45 am
Tue June 24, 2014

Exclusive First Read: You CAN Phone Home Again In 'Landline'

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 10:40 am

Rainbow Rowell turns her attention back to adult (but still young at heart) fiction in Landline, the story of Georgie, a successful sitcom writer who's not having a lot of success on the homefront. It's coming up on Christmas, and Georgie suddenly backs out of a planned holiday trip to her husband Neal's hometown — something's come up at work and she just has to stay. But when Neal packs up the kids and goes without her, she has to face up to the trouble in her marriage.

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The Salt
4:39 am
Tue June 24, 2014

Try 'I Tradizionali,' A Temporary, Culinary Tattoo

Marina Cinciripini and Sarah Richiuso.
I Tradizionali

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 6:35 am

Cooking is a messy endeavor, and few recipe books escape drips, spills and splatters. But help is at hand.

Two young Italian designers have come up with I Tradizionali, a collection of beautiful and temporary tattoos of Italian recipes that fit on your forearm.

Do the shallots go in before or after the peppers? How many eggs make the perfect frittata? Not to worry, and don't reach for the cookbook — just glance at your arm.

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Movie Interviews
1:26 am
Tue June 24, 2014

The Turbulent Love Story Behind Yves Saint Laurent's Revolutionary Rise

Yves Saint Laurent works with a model at his Paris fashion house in 1965. A new film follows the designer's rise in the fashion world.
Reg Lancaster Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 10:39 am

In 2009, Forbes rated designer Yves Saint Laurent the "Top-Earning Dead Celebrity" of the year. (Surely a bittersweet distinction.) Now, Saint Laurent's success — and how it was shaped and fed by his lover and manager Pierre Berge — is the subject of the new film Yves Saint Laurent. In it, their relationship is both interactive and supportive.

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Book Reviews
4:22 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Strange And Beautiful Love Stories Light Up 'Paper Lantern'

"iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 6:07 pm

Like Alice Munro and her small towns of Ontario, Stuart Dybek is a short story writer whose work is often closely associated with a specific place: the working-class neighborhoods of Chicago. But in both cases, referring to the geographical connection doesn't begin to get at the expansiveness of the work. I'd hardly read much Dybek before, and so my understanding of the kind of writing that interests him was limited. I imagined stories that were beautifully written, but beyond that, I didn't know about the strangeness, beauty and engagement with memory that are central to his work.

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The Salt
1:52 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Sandwich Monday: Burger King's Extra Long Cheeseburger

Do not adjust your set.
NPR

Past innovations in sandwich architecture have largely focused on height: the Big Mac, the Windows 7 Whopper, Dubai's 2,717-foot-tall Burg Dubai.

Finally, someone is thinking horizontally. Burger King has unveiled the Extra Long BBQ Cheeseburger. It's two beef patties and onion rings on a long roll.

Seth: This is great because I was really hoping to play a game of pickup after work. Wait ... that's not a football?

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History
1:14 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

50 Years Ago, Students Fought For Black Rights During 'Freedom Summer'

Fannie Lou Hamer was an activist who spoke out for black rights during Freedom Summer.
Courtesy of Ken Thompson/General Board of Global Ministries of The United Methodist Church

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 2:50 pm

This summer marks the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer, a movement to open the polls to blacks in Mississippi and end white supremacy in the state.

Freedom Summer was organized by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, or SNCC, which recruited 700 college students — mostly white students from the North — to travel to Mississippi and help African-Americans register to vote. The organizers, the students and the black people trying to register were all risking their lives, a measure of how pervasive racism was at the time.

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Monkey See
7:07 am
Mon June 23, 2014

Building The 'Issue' Documentary: On Surveillance And South Africa

Albie Sachs is the subject of the documentary Soft Vengeance, which played at the AFI DOCS festival this weekend.
AFI DOCS

What used to be Silverdocs, the week-long documentary festival in downtown Silver Spring, Md., is now AFI DOCS, a four-day festival split between Silver Spring and a variety of D.C. venues.

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The Two-Way
5:23 am
Mon June 23, 2014

Book News: Prominent Middle East Scholar Fouad Ajami Dies

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
1:26 am
Mon June 23, 2014

Librarian Nancy Pearl Maps Out A Plan For Your Summer Reading

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 10:28 am

If you like your summer reading to take you beyond the beaten path, librarian Nancy Pearl is here to help. NPR's go-to books guru joins us once again to share "under the radar" reads — books she thinks deserve more attention than they've been getting. Pearl talks with NPR's Steve Inskeep about some of the titles she picked out for the summer reading season — several of which will make you reconsider the way you think about maps.

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Movie Interviews
3:09 pm
Sun June 22, 2014

Saving Lives And Surviving Paperwork Inside The LA County ER

Dave Pomeranz, Ryan McGarry and William Mallon are some of the real-life ER doctors depicted in Code Black.
Long Shot Release 2014

Originally published on Sun June 22, 2014 4:25 pm

LA County Hospital sees some of the worst possible medical cases. Patients suffering from gunshots, car wrecks and other severe injuries frequently pass through the doors of the Level I trauma center.

At the same time, since it's a public hospital, LA County ER doctors also often see patients who don't have life-threatening emergencies, but who otherwise lack access to health care.

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Author Interviews
2:33 pm
Sun June 22, 2014

With Memories And Online Maps, A Man Finds His 'Way Home'

Saroo Brierley was born in Khandwa, Madhya Pradesh, India, and currently lives in Hobart, Tasmania.
Richard Malone Courtesy of G. P. Putnam's Sons

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 9:11 am

More than 25 years ago, Saroo Brierley was one of many poor children in rural India. At 4 years old, he couldn't read: He didn't even know the name of his hometown. His mother was raising four children on her own, and they were constantly hungry. Brierley's older brothers would hop trains to nearby towns to search for scraps to eat.

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Fine Art
6:01 am
Sun June 22, 2014

With Blocks And Bricks, A Minimalist Returns To The Gallery

"Redan" is one of the works of minimalist sculptor Carl Andre on display at his retrospective at the Dia Art Foundation in Beacon, N.Y.
Karen Michel for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 3:09 pm

Carl Andre is credited with changing the history of sculpture.

Now nearly 80, Andre once scrounged industrial materials — timber, bricks, squares and ingots of metal — and arranged them on the floor. No pedestals, no joints and no altering of the surfaces.

In 1970, the Guggenheim Museum in Manhattan gave the young artist a retrospective. The minimalist sculptor's career was going well.

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Music News
6:01 am
Sun June 22, 2014

Almost Intermediate: Adults Learn Lessons In 'Late Starters Orchestra'

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 12:35 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

By our measure, Ari Goldman is a successful man. A former New York Times reporter turned college professor, he is deeply religious and a happily married husband and father. But for all of that, there was something missing in his life. Goldman yearned to play a musical instrument.

ARI GOLDMAN: The cello is sort of the music of my soul. It's the instrument that speaks most directly to me. I never thought that I would be able to play a cello.

(SOUNDBITE OF CELLO)

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Author Interviews
6:01 am
Sun June 22, 2014

'Astonish Me' Asks, Is It Enough To Only Be Good?

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 12:17 pm

We're continuing our weekend reads recommendations with author Alexander Chee, whose novel Edinburgh won multiple literary awards. Chee's pick for you this weekend is Astonish Me, by Maggie Shipstead — the tale of a ballerina who leaves the dance world to have a baby. Chee tells NPR's Rachel Martin that he appreciates Shipstead's prose, which he calls excellent but not flashy. "I think of it as having a transparent quality which is to say that you're drawn into the story more than you are made to consistently pay attention to the style of it.

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Television
6:01 am
Sun June 22, 2014

Why TV Drama Is So Obsessed With Pandemics

Originally published on Sun June 22, 2014 10:56 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

And now for a warning. Television is in the grip of a terrifying pandemic. Or maybe an obsession with pandemics is a better way to put it. This year has seen a feverish spike in dramas where the antagonist is a deadly virus. These shows include "Helix" on Sy-fy, "The Strain" on FX and "The Last Ship," which starts Sunday on TNT. NPR's Neda Ulaby wondered why the enthusiasm for these programs is so infectious.

NEDA ULABY, BYLINE: You can probably trace this outbreak to one of the most popular shows of the past few years.

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You Must Read This
2:59 am
Sun June 22, 2014

'Silk' Luxuriates In The Bittersweet Pain Of Love And Longing

I first read Alessandro Baricco's Silk in 1998, in its English translation by Guido Waldman. The book — a tale of travel, passion and mysterious, silent communication — resonated with me immediately.

I had just returned to the United States after my graduate studies in Sri Lanka, and I was struck by the elegance of a story that appealed to my Sri Lankan heart — one raised on the bittersweet joy of not having what one desired. Not only had Baricco made that sorrow palpable, he had done it in less than a 100 pages.

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Movie Interviews
2:58 am
Sun June 22, 2014

'They Came Together' Is A Terrible Rom-Com On Purpose

Sound familiar? In David Wain's latest film, Paul Rudd plays a candy company executive who falls in love with an independent candy store owner, played by Amy Poehler.
JoJo Whilden Lionsgate

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 8:58 am

Film director David Wain's work has always been hard to describe. In some ways, it's straight-up spoof: His most famous film, Wet Hot American Summer, lampooned the summer camp films of the 1980s; and his more recent TV show, Childrens Hospital, sends up shows like Grey's Anatomy, where the female lead is living inside an inner monologue.

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My Big Break
4:02 pm
Sat June 21, 2014

From Backup Dancer To 'The Wire': How A Scar Transformed A Career

Michael K. Williams arrives at the 20th annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles.
Jordan Strauss AP

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 9:08 am

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

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Movie Reviews
3:37 pm
Sat June 21, 2014

'Miss Lovely' Exposes The Underbelly Of India's Film Industry

Zeena Bhatia plays Poonam, an aging actress, in the new film Miss Lovely, which exposes India's underground porn industry.
DADA Films

Originally published on Sat June 21, 2014 4:19 pm

The Indian film industry produces more than the glitz of Bollywood musicals. It has a sordid underbelly, too: the underground world of sex horror films.

Director Ashim Ahluwalia wanted to capture that reality, but had to turn to fiction to do it.

The new film Miss Lovely follows two brothers who produce soft-core porn in the 1980s, shooting in one-hour hotels and racing to keep one step ahead of the cops who would shut them down. Pornography is illegal in India; getting caught means a minimum of three years in jail, with no option of bail.

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Arts
12:00 pm
Sat June 21, 2014

STATE OF THE ARTS: Border Museum Association’s Scavenger Hunt

Dr. Marshall Carter-Tripp, former Director of the UTEP Centennial Museum and former President of the Border Museum Association previews the 6th annual Scavenger Hunt, which encourages participants of all ages to learn more about the area’s history, art, desert and other subjects while exploring the region’s museums.

Information:
(915) 533-5147
visitelpaso.com

Simon Says
7:17 am
Sat June 21, 2014

Buried By Picasso, The Man Beneath 'The Blue Room' Tells A Story

Picasso's The Blue Room, painted in 1901, hung in the Phillips Collection for decades.
AP

Originally published on Sat June 21, 2014 12:45 pm

What's behind the man who is below The Blue Room?

This week, conservators at the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., revealed that underneath Pablo Picasso's noted 1901 painting The Blue Room is another painting of a mustachioed man in a jacket and bow tie, resting his face on his hand.

Experts have long suspected something more must be below, as there were brushstrokes that didn't match the composition of the nude, bluish woman. Now, advanced infrared technology has revealed the man with the mustache, who also wears three rings on his fingers.

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Art & Design
6:00 am
Sat June 21, 2014

Chicago Girl Designs A Parkinson's-Proof Cup

Originally published on Sat June 21, 2014 9:52 am

Lily Born, 11, has designed a spill-proof cup for people with Parkinson's disease. She and her dad, Joe Born, talk with NPR's Scott Simon about the invention she's named Kangaroo Cups.

Games & Humor
6:00 am
Sat June 21, 2014

How To Catch A Chess Cheater

Originally published on Sat June 21, 2014 9:52 am

Ken Regan could be called a chess detective. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the computer scientist and chess master whose algorithm reveals whether players are cheating at the game.

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